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Beginning Baitcaster Vs Non beginning

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Would someone please explain to me what you would consider a "beginning Baitcaster" If money were no object is there such a thing as a "beginners Baitcaster"? What I mean is I hear a lot of talk on these forums where people say " oh for the money it's a decent Baitcaster for beginners but............" What does that mean? Are Baitcasters for beginners easier to learn on, don't cast as far, not as many backlashes? Help me understand please. I would think the more expensive the Baitcaster the easier it would be to use because of all the advanced techno. 

Confused?

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I'd agree that a higher quality reel performs better than an entry level product.  These reels do routinely offer consistent & repeatable performance which can be a big help when learning to use the equipment correctly.   So theoretically this should help a "beginner, but often times it does not.   Perhaps think of it like learning to drive - You could certainly learn on a Bentley but most do not.

What does really help speed up the revolving spool usage learning curve, is instead of having a high quality reel, which may not be necessary ~ having high quality instruction is hard to replace.   It's extra challenging to teach ourselves something with out it.

A-Jay

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When I hear "beginner bait caster," I think entry level or in other words inexpensive because maybe someone doesn't want spend too much money on something they aren't sure they will enjoy.  I agree that something more expensive will usually perform better and give an inexperienced user less headaches.  Some expensive reels are meant for more advanced users though like for instance a megabass TD Ito which has super fast r tuned spool which requires a decent thumb.

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IMO a beginner bait caster would be of good enough quality to offer  consistent, reliable casting that you won't "outgrow" as your skills progress. I find either centrifugal or dual brakes the most forgiving. Shop among the name brands in the $100>msrp range and you'll do well 

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I agree with DVT. A beginner is not well served with a cheap reel, but does not need a high end reel either. The quality of reels now available for around $100 is amazing in my opinion. Methods and materials have come a long way.

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A beginner baitcaster to me is a reel that you won't mind being a sunken cost in case you decide a baitcaster isn't your cup of tea and decide to either let the reel collect dust or sell it.  A decent/good beginner baitcaster is one that is cheap enough to be a sunken cost but performs well enough to be used without being replaced with a better reel if you decide you like to use baitcasters.  For me a used Citica E series fits that criteria perfectly!

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2 hours ago, A-Jay said:

I'd agree that a higher quality reel performs better than an entry level product.  These reels do routinely offer consistent & repeatable performance which can be a big help when learning to use the equipment correctly.   So theoretically this should help a "beginner, but often times it does not.   Perhaps think of it like learning to drive - You could certainly learn on a Bentley but most do not.

What does really help speed up the revolving spool usage learning curve, is instead of having a high quality reel, which may not be necessary ~ having high quality instruction is hard to replace.   It's extra challenging to teach ourselves something with out it.

A-Jay

 

The last paragraph is the best advice right there :)

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I find the Daiwa Tatula 100 a pretty good reel for a "beginner" at an affordable cost. MSRP is $150 but it can be found new on Ebay or Amazon for less than  $95.

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I would say a reel with centrifugal brakes would be best for a beginner. It seems most people that aren't used to a baitcaster backlash at the beginning of the cast because they don't have a smooth cast. They might whip the rod a little too hard in the beginning of the cast causing a backlash that centrifugal brakes would stop. But most lower cost casting reels do not come with centrifugal brakes and only come with magnetic brakes.

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In my opinion a good beginner reel would be one that isn't a hunk of junk. It offers decent quality while still being affordable. It's not too expensive that if you decide you don't like it, you're out a bunch of money, and not so cheap that you're only going to get a year or less of fishing out of it. 

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To be honest my first baitcasting setup was a BPS Carbonlite rod with a Pro qualifier reel. Many here recommend this as a "beginners" setup for the value and performance it brings. I have some higher end stuff I use and while its great it honestly does not blow the doors off that exact same setup I started with. Like DVT said $100 and up on the reel and the field is loaded with great options. That beginning setup has now become a setup I can throw anywhere pretty accurately and has stayed reliable the entire time I learned the art of bait casting

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22 hours ago, blckshirt98 said:

A beginner baitcaster to me is a reel that you won't mind being a sunken cost in case you decide a baitcaster isn't your cup of tea and decide to either let the reel collect dust or sell it.  A decent/good beginner baitcaster is one that is cheap enough to be a sunken cost but performs well enough to be used without being replaced with a better reel if you decide you like to use baitcasters.  For me a used Citica E series fits that criteria perfectly!

X2 -

I started out with a PQ and Carbonlite and progressed to pricier reels the more I read this forum.  What I notice the most between the PQ and my Shimanos, Diawas, Conc**t reels is that the more expensive ones feel smoother.  When I sent my PQs to Delaware Valley Tackle for tuning/cleaning, that gap closed considerably.

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Always important to distinguish between a bait caster that is user friendly vs a cheap baitcaster. Both tend to be used interchangeably as most beginners are likely to buy cheaper gear when starting out.

I too agree that the Shimanos with the VBS style breaking are great reels to learn on that aren't too awefull expensive either.  

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From the perspective of the money I've spent, what you gain most from upgrading is smoothness and to some extent, durability when you jump from say the $100 range to the $150 or above. As mentioned above, I am also a big fan of the BPS PQ because it is very forgiving and it's hard to outgrow it.  I never feel like I am cheating myself catching a fish on one.  Do I enjoy throwing my Lew's? Yep because they cast further and feel smoother when I'm reeling them in.  To me, it's a Camaro/Corvette comparison.  You will have a smile on your face either way, one is just more refined.  

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