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Apples

Fishing slump??

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Yesterday was the fifth time in a row that I have gone fishing and not caught a thing. Each time I've been out for at least 3 hours in the mornings. I throw everything at them, senkos, frogs, crankbaits, etc. Nothing. Has anyone else experienced a slump like this? If so, how did you get out of it? I love fishing but it's very discouraging when you go out that many times and don't catch a thing. Any suggestions? Thanks

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Welcome aboard!

We all suffer slumps here and there.
Part of the sport. Just keep plugging
away and maybe try slowing down 
your presentation a little, too. Often
that's a solution when bass aren't
seemingly in the mood for fast stuff.

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Where in Sacramento are you fishing?  The river?  Folsom Lake?  I'm assuming if you've gone five times in a row without a bite, that you're not fishing the exact same spot each time?  Keep moving and explore new water and look for some new places where the fish might be grouped up.

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electroshocking is a very underutilized fishing tactic in my humble opinion. 

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The dog days of Summer is what this period is called for a good reason. The summer transition between post spawn the bass are adjusting to ecosystem with lots of young of the year prey, water temperatures rising, aquatic plant growth booming and in some lakes water levels may be changing. Add increased summer recreational boating traffic increasing, there is lot going on in the basses world and we must make adjustments to where and how we fish.

The simple truth is you can't catch inactive bass or bass that are not located where you are fishing. You need to change the location or time you fish.

Do you fish from a boat or shore bound?

Tom

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7 hours ago, YoTone said:

electroshocking is a very underutilized fishing tactic in my humble opinion. 

If you're having trouble finding fish, this is the answer. One pass over an area and you know for sure if it holds fish.  Catching them is easy too. You just turn the boat around and scoop them up with a net. 

Best part is you don't ever have to put your beer down.

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Try slowing down and simplifying things.  Pick one or 2 baits you have confidence in and leave everything else at home.  I used to try to throw my full tackle box every trip and spent the entire day changing baits and running around the lake.  

This year I've spent more time in the kayak and I only take 2-3 rods and a few baits and have caught more fish than ever.  The kayak forces me to fish slower and limits how much I can bring.  

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You need to stay confident. Fishing is a very psychological sport. If you dont feel confident in the bait you are using you just wont work it with the same enthusiasm. Keep you head up and the fish will come!

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I will fish either a worm or lizard. Very slow. I remember reading about this certain subject years ago written by Larry Nixon. He said something I have always remembered. If you thinking you are fishing a worm to slow, then you are not slow enough. I have left a worm in one place for well over a minute and as soon as I hopped it.....a bass jumped all over it. It has happened to me more times than I can even remember.

so, if I'm in a rut, I fish slower.

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I agree with a few of the posts above that you should go to a bait you have confidence in.  For me that would be a texas rigged craw or a spinnerbait.  Also, remember to have fun!  Any day on the lake is better than a day at work!

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Hey everyone thank you very much for the responses. To answer your questions, I've been fishing all over the delta and in several Northern California lakes. Yesterday marked 7 trips without a fish, but I get it, it's 100°+. I've been fishing from a boat in a new location each time. I think that slowing down is a great idea, so I'll try that out. Thanks!!

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The Delta is a finicky beast, are you checking the tides?  Also do a google search on "cooch fishing summer delta bass" and read some of Andy's write ups on summer bass in the Delta.

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6 hours ago, blckshirt98 said:

The Delta is a finicky beast, are you checking the tides?  Also do a google search on "cooch fishing summer delta bass" and read some of Andy's write ups on summer bass in the Delta.

Andy"Cooch" Cuccia, give him a call, very friendly man who knows the deta.

Tom

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Yes, I've experienced slumps where I'll goose-egg consecutively.  I downsize and simplify baits and try not to 'over think' it and just go out and fish.  

The membership here is a great resource of information and support.  

Your slump will come to an end.  Best of luck with it.

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It happens down here in Florida sometimes.  Its summer, hotter then hell, water temps near 90*, and sometimes stagnant water.  It can be real tough!  Fish early and fish late.

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slow down.  think you slowed down already?  now slow down 4 times more.  set the rod down and text a few friends.  pick it up and feel a bass hit that catatonic senko.  now that's some summer time dead sticking.

 

also fish big baits slow.

or small baits fast.

or best fish small baits slow--Ned rig.  

if you can't catch'm on a Ned rig it's time to find a new hobby:eyebrows:

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If temps are that hot than try some night ops if possible. Less pressure and cooler

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Apples, talk about a slump.

Last time out was on July 17 where I caught 6 nice ones at a local lake.

Had toe surgery on July 20th and can't do anything to at least August 201th, if not after Labor Day.

Now that's a slump.

Keep your confidence up. Don't lose any confidence in your fishing talent. The bass may have gone deep and you can't find them. Not your fault. You are doing everything correctly. It is the bass' problem, not yours.

So read all of the replies and give 'em a good ole California try. You have thrown down the gauntlet to the bass and now it is up to you to follow through and show those nasty green monsters who is boss. Now go out there and make us all proud.

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The heat of the summer, A split shot rigged worm.  Looking for cover helps too if your fishing 9am to midday.  My best times to fish are from early am dark till 9am, at 12 noon, 5pm till dark. The fish put the feed bag on during these times because in the changing light conditions the basses eyes adjust to the changing light conditions faster than the bait fishes eyes do making them easy prey. At 12 noon the plants give off plankton which the baitfish feed on. The baitfish are more vulnerable at this time.

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When things get slumpy I move two directions:  Smaller and Slower.  Downsizing opens up more "fish" opportunities - and slowing down usually makes since as if they were aggressive you would be catching fish.  Then it's just a matter of putting the bait on the fish.  Sometimes you just need a fish, any fish, to get things going.  Don't be afraid to go ultra-light and grab a bluegill just to get the skunk off, lol.

Bass wise, if I'm really struggling I will generally look for a favorite point with cover and deep water structure.  As an example, there is a great little secondary point in a cove - it has some cover at the bank, sloped down with a steep drop on one of the sides and leads to a creek channel in a 90 degree turn. It covers about 1 foot to 20 at the bottom of the creek channel.  You wont always find a fish on it, but usually there's at least one somewhere.  Give's a little incite to where the rest of the fish are.  Other wise, I just start at shore cover and work out to the deeper structure.  Sooner or later, you will pick up something.  Good luck, and tight lines!

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The OP is fishing a tidal delta known as the California San Joaquin Delta and rates in the top 5 of Bassmaster best 100  for 3 years now. The delta is unique with over 1,500 miles of fishable waterways...it's massive! Several major rivers and hundreds of sloughs, all with tidal surge. It takes a life time to learn the delta and that is why Cooch was suggested, he is my go to source When fishing the delta.

This is where Flipping/pitching was made popular by Dee Thomas, very heavy cover with tulies and grass mats....no place for finesse, it's all about punching, flipping, pitching the cover and learning the tides.

Tom

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On 7/7/2016 at 11:38 AM, Apples said:

Each time I've been out for at least 3 hours in the mornings. I throw everything at them, senkos, frogs, crankbaits, etc. Nothing. 

On 7/27/2016 at 11:57 AM, Apples said:

I've been fishing all over the delta and in several Northern California lakes.

I've been fishing from a boat in a new location each time. 

 

Indecision:  a wavering between two or more possible courses of action.

Dog Days of Summer is my forte; all my biggest bass (except one) & all my largest stringers were caught from late June-mid-September.

To be successful ya gotta make some decisions!

Pick two or three "power" techniques & leave the rest at home!

Right now I carry a Texas Rig  (either weighted or unweighed), Big Jig-N-Craw, Punch Rig, & a Frog Rod.

Pick a body of water & stay with it!

Not a good idea to be bouncing from lake to lake. Summer bass are predictable, once ya find em. Once ya find em ya gotta stay on em!

Fish at night if at all possible! ;)

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Thank you to all for the encouraging responses. Next time I fish I'll go out there and fish slower and smaller. 

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