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RF813

When to use a bullet weight?

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I've seen a lot of videos / posts on whether or not to peg a weight, how to stop abrasion, but what I am wondering is:  When Texas Rigging a worm, when should you use a weight, vs. when shouldn't you use a weight?  

I fish up in NY / CT and the areas very from really weedy to clear, so I'm trying to figure out the right time and place for weighting. 

 

Thanks,

 

Rich 

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I usually let the conditions determine that.  I rarely throw a T-rigged plastic without a weight, but it does have its time and place. As a rule for me, I will start out with the smallest weight the conditions allow. 

For wood cover, lay downs and brush piles, I usually start with 1/16 or 1/8 oz tungsten bullet. For thicker weeds I'll go heavier like 1/4 or 5/16 oz up to 1/2 oz. If the weeds are matted, I'll step up to a 3/4 or heavier.

Wind, water depth and the rate of fall the fish respond to are all determining factors as well. Windy conditions and deeper water, and I'll step up the weight size to get a better feel for what I am doing. If the fish seem to be responding better to a certain rate of fall, I'll adjust accordingly. From my experience, the slower the fall the better, *usually. Certainly not always the case, as an aggressive fish may respond better to a bait that zips down the water column than one that slowly drifts down. 

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Its all personal preference I would say. I agree 100% with Jar but i often throw weightless in relatively heavy weeds just to keep the bait on top. Senko for instance, I prefer them weightless and T- Rigged in or around heavy weeds. If im fishing wood, rocks, or docks ill use a weight. The deeper the water, the heavier ill go. Let the fall rate be a determining factor as well. Ive had a hot bite with a 1/4oz bullet weight and creature bait just shut off. Switched to a weightless senko and started catching fish again. 

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The only time I usually don't use a weight is when I'm using a Zoom Trick Worm or some "floating worm". They're heavier and designed to be T rigged weightless. You can cast them without weight. Or when I'm using a wacky rig. But I usually use the same worm for that. I'm saying you should never use Trick Worms with a weight. They're extremely versatile.

I have experimented with using a magnum size worm weightless, but didn't catch anything on it. That's just not in my wheelhouse yet.

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Always! In all seriousness the only time I DON"T use one is a weightless stik bait or a weightless soft plastic jerk bait.

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Easy answer; Whenever you want or need to get the bait down on the bottom, use a heavy enough weight to be able to feel when it's moving on the bottom.  

For swimming a worm, use one heavy enough to keep it in the zone you're targeting throughout your retrieve. 

For fishing the tops of weeds, or when you want an enticingly slow fall, go weightless. 

Remember that the more salt in the plastic the more it will sink, so go with thinner worms to stay on top of the weeds

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The only time I dont use a weight is in  moss / snot grass . I dont go with the smallest ones either . I use a 3/16th or 1/4 most of the time with a six inch worm .  I have fished side by side dozens of  times with guys using the lightest weight possible and almost always  outfish them . The friends who use heavier weights have just as much success as I and often outfish me .

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7 hours ago, Jar11591 said:

I usually let the conditions determine that.  I rarely throw a T-rigged plastic without a weight, but it does have its time and place. As a rule for me, I will start out with the smallest weight the conditions allow. 

For wood cover, lay downs and brush piles, I usually start with 1/16 or 1/8 oz tungsten bullet. For thicker weeds I'll go heavier like 1/4 or 5/16 oz up to 1/2 oz. If the weeds are matted, I'll step up to a 3/4 or heavier.

Wind, water depth and the rate of fall the fish respond to are all determining factors as well. Windy conditions and deeper water, and I'll step up the weight size to get a better feel for what I am doing. If the fish seem to be responding better to a certain rate of fall, I'll adjust accordingly. From my experience, the slower the fall the better, *usually. Certainly not always the case, as an aggressive fish may respond better to a bait that zips down the water column than one that slowly drifts down. 

see above…….very well put.

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doesn't look like Mr T rig expert @Catt has chimed in yet.   I used to peg but i'm sure it was him that changed it for me. I think he recommended only pegging when fishing vertical ie pitching timber or a target.  all other horizontal times it's not pegged.  not pegged being preferred b/c a fish will inhale the lure and not the weight=bass hold onto it longer.  maybe he can verify 

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ROF!

Rate Of Fall!

How fast your lure falls through the water column will attract the bass' attention.

Some days they prefer ROF fast while other days they want it slow.

It's the same with jigs ;)

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yea i read that as peg vs not peg:eyebrows:

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Thank you all for the info, much appreciated!

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For me the more finicky and pressured the fish are, the more I fish weightless. When the fish aren't really biting is a lot better to have the super slow rof to make the bait more tempting and easy to eat. When the bass are out on the prowl I go with a heavier weight, sometimes the bass are in a more chasing/hunting mood. And flipping 1/2oz tungsten in 5' or less of water is the way to go, and I will toss weightless senkos in 20' of water if the fish are suspended their not really looking for food. 

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If I am fishing around vegetation I usually don't use a weight.  If I do, it is a small one. 

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