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BankBassing

Baitcaster won't let out line fast enough to pitch???

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I have an Abu Garcia Silver Max, which I love.  It casts great.  However, for some reason, I can't get it to release line fast enough to pitch.  I press the button, hold my thumb on the spool, swing it out there, letting my thumb loose, but the bait doesn't get out there more than a foot farther out of the guides than it starts.  I have tried turning my tension knob all the way loose, but still it doesn't get out there unless I'm using a very heavy bait.  If you're using a T-rigged Senko, forget it.  It's so bad that if I have to pitch, I have to use my spinning combo.  What am I missing?  Is it possibly the type of braid I have on?  I'm stumped.

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Can't help as I've only tried pitching in my back yard with a combo that definitely wasn't the right one for the job, but I could get 30' after a little practice.  Mainly I would like to point out that flipping doesn't pull line off the spool on the cast.  At least not as I understand flipping.  My understanding is when you flip you have already pulled out the amount of line needed for the cast.  The spool remains locked (or bail closed).  When you pitch the spool will be disengaged (or bail open) to allow for more line to be pulled off the spool.

Maybe I understand it wrong as I have seen videos showing you how to flip, but afaic they were pitching.

Maybe you aren't getting enough speed on the lift?  My understanding is some reels pitch much better than others.  Maybe the Silver Max falls in the "not so good for pitching" category.  However, based on the combo I was using, I'd have to agree you should be getting a lot more distance than you are.  Some pros will be along shortly to set you straight.  :D

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1 hour ago, BankBassing said:

I have an Abu Garcia Silver Max, which I love.  It casts great.  However, for some reason, I can't get it to release string fast enough to flip or pitch.  I press the button, hold my thumb on the spool, swing it out there, letting my thumb loose, but the bait doesn't get out there more than a foot farther out of the guides than it starts.  I have tried turning my tension knob all the way loose, but still it doesn't get out there unless I'm using a very heavy bait.  If you're using a T-rigged Senko, forget it.  It's so bad that if I have to pitch/flip, I have to use my spinning combo.  What am I missing?  Is it possibly the type of braid I have on?  I'm stumped.

When you say "It Casts Great" please define great. 

If you can make a long cast, why would you not be able to make a very short cast - which is what flipping & pitching a bait is.

Did you recently change or add line to your reel ? Perhaps you've over filled the spool and the excess line is rubbing on the reel frame preventing unobstructed release of the spool.

Post a picture of your reel that shows the reel's spool of line; that might help.

A-Jay

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I'll assume for the sake of conversation that you are talking about pitching. It might have something to do with the rod. If the rod isn't stiff enough or too stiff for the weight you are casting it tends to loose momentum. An idea of the power (ie: med/heavy, medium)  and action (ie: fast, medium, slow) of the rod will give us a clue if the rod is the problem. Also it could be your technique. Slow down and concentrate on the pendulum movement of the bait. I flip and pitch regularly and even I find that watching videos about flipping and pitching online help my technique. There is always some small facet of the technique that I can work on. 

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Set the mag brakes low and spool tension with just a little side to side wobble

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Forgive my noob terminology mistakes.  Yes, pitching, and yes "line."  I am using a Medium Heavy Cherrywood HD rod by Berkley.  My line is not even close to rubbing the frame on my reel.  I will post a pic later when I can.

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I don't have experience with that reel, but for me some reels pitch better than others especially with lighter lures.  Reels with lighter spools start up faster and reels with heavier, deeper spools take more inertia to get started which makes the lure pitch upwards and can backlash easier.  

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When you're learning to pitch, don't bother with anything lighter than 3/4 oz.  Once you get the action down, decrease bait size in small increments.

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I agree that a little heavier weight is easier to start with as you can feel the "pull" of the weight as it swings easier. To me if the reel is casting fine its more than likely technique. By that I mean probably just a practice issue. That is barring anything like AJ suggested or other issues.

Do you run your reel tight? (brakes on and spool tension snug) If you are you probably need to back them off for best results.

When all you have as a means of casting is the gravitational pull of the swinging bait it is much more crucial that the timing of your release point be accurate to get distance. In other words the window of the most pull in the swing of the lure is very small. This makes practice important to be consistent at releasing the spool.  Especially if you want distance each time. 

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In the beginning, it's just gravity, but eventually you will gain centrifugal force as you learn to swing the bait with force as you raise the rod tip.

That's when you'll be able to sling lighter baits.

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39 minutes ago, J Francho said:

In the beginning, it's just gravity, but eventually you will gain centrifugal force as you learn to swing the bait with force as you raise the rod tip.

That's when you'll be able to sling lighter baits.

Yeah that's what I was trying to explain. That centrifugal force is only pulling in a certain sweet spot for a good release. :thumbsup:

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Save up for a little better reel and problem solved :) 

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You should be able to pitch with it  Make sure your string is in good condition and practice . How much line do you let out and hold in your hand before starting the pitch .?

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I figured out the problem, and discovered another in the process, but I think both are on their way to resolution.  I had my brakes turned up halfway, since someone advised me as someone new to baitcasting this would minimize backlash.  I turned them down, and immediately I was able to pitch just as well as I could with my spinning rod.  Next cast, however, BACKLASH.  I realized that having the brakes turned up was allowing me to cast without enough thumb tension on the spool.  I practiced today while on the water, and was already learning to cast correctly, and when I did I was able to cast much farther than I had been doing previously.  Long story short, brakes turned up did help me not to backlash... it also helped me not to learn to cast correctly.  Thanks for the tips guys.

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Interesting...only because, I use very little spool tension, and full brakes for pitching.  Brakes aren't usually enough to stop a cast, just slow a cast.  Spool tension can stop a cast. My pitching reels have Daiwa's Mag-V II braking system though, so maybe it's different.  I can't remember what the Max line uses.

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Exactly your spool adjustment maybe too tight. I have some older baitcaster reels that have a pitching switch. We're going back decades. I have no clue how the switch works.

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While you are learning, pull out enough line to simulate your maximum pitch and the add another 10 feet. Now, toss some tape on the line left on the reel. This will allow you to make mistakes and not turn it into a YouTube "how to remove a backlash" video.  This will help build your confidence and show you that yes, you have mastered pitching. 

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