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NHBull

Need a setup for jigs and cranks

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Howdy Folks, and apologize in advance for a question that I am sure has been covered in depth.  

I spend all my time  a crystal clear Lake and seldom are in the weeds and seldom go deeper than 25 ft.

I have a Med/xF spinning setup for seko's

and light bait and a M/H  F spinning set up for everything else. 

Looking for advise on  baitcaster set ups for jigs and one for cranks...I should also say that I get killer deals on shim another  and Loomis.  Thanks for any input, Al

 

 

 

 

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Ask your killer dealer.. he should be able to steer you in the right direction. 

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The crank bait rod should have a moderate action and powered to handle the size divingvlures you plan to use, i.e.; 3/8-3/4 with 12 lb line would be 4 MH, something between 7' to 7'4".

The jig/worm rod should have fast action and powered to effectively set hooks with standard to heavy wire, lures weights 3/8-1 oz, line 10 to 17 lb would be 4 to 5 power or MH to H, depending on your preference.

Tom

 

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Lets start with what is your budget for each combo. I never suggest purchasing equipment that you "can afford now" with the intent of upgrading later. I als will suggest some equipment in the moderate price range. If you can afford much higher my suggestions can be amended easily.

For most anglers getting started I always suggest the following:

1.  A light to medium action spinning rod/reel combo- check you have that covered.                       Your second rod help fill in some other baits that makes it handy, like light weight jerkbaits and      spinnerbaits,chatterbaits, 1/8 to 1/2 ounce texas rigged worms etc.  

2.  Look for a 6'6" to 7'3" (depends a lot about your preference and personal height) baitcasting   rod  that specs as 1/4 to 3/4 ounce lures with a medium heavy power and a fast action tip.           This rod will handle all of your heavier plastics, jigs, even some topwaters, bigger heavier              spinnerbaits. If your budget is less than $100 look at rods from Diawa like a Tatula. You could go to Dicks and look at an Quantum Escalade, or a Fenwick HMG series rod. If you can afford over $100 look at a Dobyns Fury FR 703C, for the $110 there are very nice. In this range an Abu  Garcia Veritas will work well too. For a little more consider an Irod Genesis II they will run $149,  

 3. For your crankbaits consider a Berkley Lightning Shock in a 6'6"med mod for around $50.  If   you can afford more I recommend an Irod Genesis II Gabes Rip Rap Special, an IRG 703CC.   Again, it sells for $149. Both Shimano and G Loomis make some good rods, but most of them     are more money.  Dobyns also has some nice rods that fit the bill also. 

I would pair them up with a Diawa Tatula CT. It is a workhorse of a reel, although I like the Daiwa Exceler and all of the Daiwa Tatula and Tatula Type Rs as well.

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Thanks for the input.  These days I do spend more one time as I find it cheaper than upgrading later. Now I just need to decide if I want to go with "lefts".  A bit of carple tunnel in the right may impact that decision...thanks again, Al

 

 

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It is interesting you say that. I have turned wrenches as a mechanic for my whole career. If i use one type reel for too long my hands will cramp up. So my solution has been to use both right and left handed reels. My system is simple, I use righties for lures that I chuck and wind such as crankbait, spinnerbaits, chatterbaits,etc.  All of the baits that I impart action to such as jerkbaits, jigs, carolina rigs, texas rigged plastics and frogs I use lefties so my right hand can get a break. It also means I have my dominate hand on the rod for things like flipping and pitching  which help me because the fish often hit right when the lure first enters the water. I can react a little quicker. I taught myself to get very comfortable using both hands so I am sure you can do it as well. It used to be that there was only a few reels made in a lefty version. Today Daiwa, Lews and others make most of their reels in both left and right handed models in all of the gear ratios.

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Do you have experience casting a conventional bait casting reel?

Spinning reel combo you normally hold the rod right hand, reel with the left because most folks are right handed and right eye dominate. Casting with your right hand is your normal motion and you can do that with both bait casting and spinning. A left hand bait casting reel allows you to continue holding the rod in your right hand and operating the reel left handed.

I use both spinning and bait casting outfits,casts both with my right hand, keep the spinning rod in my right hand and switch the casting rod to my left hand to retrieve lure because bait casting reels had right side handles when I learned and that's what I prefer doing.

If you have wrists issues light weight and good balance is your goal and you have lots of good rods and reels to choose from depending on your budget.

Tom

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Cranks:

GLoomis CBR785 + any 5.0:1 gear ratio reel ( choose whatever brand you like, personally I like Shimano and Daiwa )

Jigs:

GLoomis MBR784-785 + any 6.2 + :1 gear ratio reel ( choose the brand you like )

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2 hours ago, WRB said:

Do you have experience casting a conventional bait casting reel?

Spinning reel combo you normally hold the rod right hand, reel with the left because most folks are right handed and right eye dominate. Casting with your right hand is your normal motion and you can do that with both bait casting and spinning. A left hand bait casting reel allows you to continue holding the rod in your right hand and operating the reel left handed.

I use both spinning and bait casting outfits,casts both with my right hand, keep the spinning rod in my right hand and switch the casting rod to my left hand to retrieve lure because bait casting reels had right side handles when I learned and that's what I prefer doing.

If you have wrists issues light weight and good balance is your goal and you have lots of good rods and reels to choose from depending on your budget.

 

 

Tom

I have tried reading my spin casters in both hands and the left feels more natural.  Last weekend I was practicing with a RH BC for an hour or so and and it did feel good given the grip is different.  My concern is that I feel bites and have better action with my RH, but these wrist are starting to bark.....that said, changing hands felt awkward......

 

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So you don't have bait casting reel experience. If you are more comfortable holding a rod in the right hand to retreive lures then that is the answer, use a left handle baitcasting reel.

You like Shimano so go with a Shimano CU71HG reel, they are a little lighter weight than Daiwa and a 3-4 power or MH fast action Shimano* of your choice. Start with 10 to 12 lb Big Game line.

Tom

 *CRC73MHB balances good and no reason to pay 2X for the Loomis name. IROD IRG744C-MH would be another good choice.

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2 hours ago, Raul said:

Cranks:

GLoomis CBR785 + any 5.0:1 gear ratio reel ( choose whatever brand you like, personally I like Shimano and Daiwa )

Jigs:

GLoomis MBR784-785 + any 6.2 + :1 gear ratio reel ( choose the brand you like )

You may like longer rods.  The MBR844C is one of my favorites.

:fishing-026:

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Thanks again gents,,,,,

 

Looks like Christmas is coming early!

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5 hours ago, roadwarrior said:

You may like longer rods.  The MBR844C is one of my favorites.

:fishing-026:

Yup, I always forget 66 + rods, it's just that I don't buy them, they are too long for me.

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For cranks look for a 7 ft to 7'3 ft medium to medium heavy power rod, with a moderate to moderate fast action. For example i have a 7 ft medium moderate action Fenwick aetos which can take cranks up to 10ft deep. I would pair that up with a 6;3.1 gear ratio reel with 10 -12 lb fluorocarbon. 

For jigs i would go 7ft+ and go either mag medium heavy or heavy with a fast or extra fast tip. At the moment I'm using a 7ft medium heavy (more of a heavy) fast action rod, but I'm looking at picking up a 7"3 heavy this winter. Pair this up with a 7;3.1 gear ratio + and some 15+ lb floor or some heavy braid and you are good! 

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