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Winter kayak clothing

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What's your winter kayak fishing clothing? I have a SOT and don't want to stop fishing this year. I'm in SC and it doesn't freeze over. The water typically won't fall much below 50 degrees.

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Semi dry suit.  Get one with a "relief zipper"

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Same thing here in Cali, never too cold to go fishing. So, I wear long sleeve shirt, water shoes, take a towel and polyester pants that dry quickly. I might wear gloves with the finger tips cut off. 

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You will hear the term the "120 rule". That is when the sum of the air temperature and the water temperature are 120 degrees or less. A dry suit is recommended because at those temperatures if you get soaking wet you are likely headed towards hypothermia.

1. dry suit

2. dry clothes and a towel in a dry bag

3. a quick and reliable way to start a fire to warm yourself up

 

 

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34 minutes ago, bchase44 said:

That appears to be a base layer (like long underwear). That is not a drysuit if that was your question. 

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I was actually going to try it Thursday with a high of 63 and water temps probably the same.. so just slightly higher than 120.

But I have never tried that before.  My kayak is a WS RIDE 13.6.. I usually never get wet unless it's loading / unloading.

I will have to research these dry suits, most seem over my budget.  (and yes I at first thought that was a dry-suit :))

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Regarding winter fishing from the kayak. I have been fishing from a kayak since 1991.

When I was younger and did not know any better I went fishing in the winter completely unprepared. I dressed warmly enough so that I would not freeze based on the air temperatures. If I had an accident, got dumped and wound up in the water I would most likely have died.

Over time as I began to understand what the potential dangers were, I upgraded to wearing waders. Then I upgraded to wearing waders and a "drytop". Both of those options do offer some protection but if you get in a bad situation out there the "Grim Reaper" will come calling.

Ultimately I bit the bullet, kept my eyes open for a drysuit on sale in the summer and went ahead and bought one.

Fishing in the winter can be very enjoyable. Very few anglers out there on the water and there is something inherently rewarding about being able to still catch a bass on a lure when the water is in the high 30's - low 40's.

 

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If the water is below 50 I put the outriggers on my kayak regardless of where I'm going. I don't risk falling in at that stage of the game. I still wear a rain jacket and rain pants though to keep water from splashing on me. Usually a fleece layer under those and then some kind of polyester undershirt. Fleece pants too and then I wear rain boots so I can get it in without getting my feet wet. 

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Good video. Certainly brings up a lot to think about.  

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Hey, what do some of you guys use for gloves? Are there any good options for waterproof semi-warm gloves that can be used when fishing and paddling? I've heard some say thin neoprene diving gloves? 

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in that video he says he has bibs and the video shows him putting them on.  But what happens if he falls in the water?  What keeps the water from going down the top of the bibs?  

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2 hours ago, hoosierbass07 said:

in that video he says he has bibs and the video shows him putting them on.  But what happens if he falls in the water?  What keeps the water from going down the top of the bibs?  

A Wading Belt.  There are many different types / kinds.  Some offer back support, the simplest ones do not.

Essentially it's simply a belt worn fairly tightly at the waist.  When worn properly (which is easy) it does a good job of preventing waders from filling up.

A Dry suit is really the way to go though.

A-Jay

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Here is another video on cold water outerwear.

note: I have a friend who is a kayak fishing guide and he does not like this video because the dunking is done under controlled conditions. In his experience out on the water in winter it may not be quite so easy to get back to the kayak.

 

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I live in Virginia where it doesn't get ice cold like some of these northern guys, but sub 20 degree air temps aren't that rare. I typically wear long johns, those cabelas outfitter wool/Berber blend pants and jacket, wool socks, then waders. over top of that I wear a waterproof jacket to shed any water that might get splashed up on me, and then I hope for the love of the flying spaghetti monster that nothing bad happens. I'm in case it does, I keep a dry bag with new clothes, a towel, wool blanket, and a lighter in the boat. It's better to have the back up and hope you never need it, then to need it and not have it. even if you invest in a wetsuit, I still think you should bring those items along. 

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I've been doing some duck hunting out of the kayak the last few weeks in some frigid temps I've been wearing some 5mm neoprene waders and my galforce hunting jacket that's "waterproof" it's been working well. My hands have gotten cold that's about it but my hands are always cold. I was out on Lake Ontario in 15-25mph winds with 3-4' waves and stayed dry other then my hands from picking up downed birds in the water. 

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Good thread and I've never stepped foot in a kayak. I do have a question about the dry suits. I normally fish until the water is in the 30's and air temps as low as 20. Currently, when it drops below 40* I dress like I'm on a construction site with insulated boots and carhartt bibs and an inflatable vest. Were I to fall off the boat, surely I'm sinking to the bottom. As far as the dry suits are concerned, Could I fish comfortably all day in them in temps below 35* with just long johns, jeans, t shirt and a sweatshirt? What about wind penetration? I know some of the ice fishermen around here wear Arctic Armor with the floatation built in, but they are not a dry suit.

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30 minutes ago, slonezp said:

Good thread and I've never stepped foot in a kayak. I do have a question about the dry suits. I normally fish until the water is in the 30's and air temps as low as 20. Currently, when it drops below 40* I dress like I'm on a construction site with insulated boots and carhartt bibs and an inflatable vest. Were I to fall off the boat, surely I'm sinking to the bottom. As far as the dry suits are concerned, Could I fish comfortably all day in them in temps below 35* with just long johns, jeans, t shirt and a sweatshirt? What about wind penetration? I know some of the ice fishermen around here wear Arctic Armor with the floatation built in, but they are not a dry suit.

Dry suits are solely for wind and water protection.  All your insulations comes from what you wear underneath.  As far as being comfortable goes, that is up to you.  For me personally i would be fine but i also don't wear cotton anything in the winter especially when outside.  You want something that traps more air for the insulation aspect like fleece.

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Under my drysuit I wear a "base layer". Like long underwear but a material that wicks water away from your skin, On top I will have another shirt or two for insulation, then a layer of fleece, then the drysuit over everything. On my legs I will have a fleece layer over the base layer.

Stay away from cotton (like jeans), Cotton does not wick moisture away from you and it robs you of heat. As we like to say in the kayak world "cotton kills".

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I have a drysuit but I almost never use it becuase my hands always get uncomfortablly cold way to fast to make the whole process worthwhile.  I have some neoprene gloves with filip up thumbs and pointer finger tips, but as soon as water gets in I freeze. 

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for 50s Normally if i am out by myself I am using a wetsuit and raingear to cut to the wind.   Being a bigger guy I am not able to get into a dry suit without it being custom.  when fishing with others  I normally stick with a set of waders with warm stuff underneath.  once  it gets into the 40s I call it a year and stay home but that is me.

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A little off-topic but this reminded me of some guy a while back when I was really young, paddling through the ice...yes, THROUGH the ice, in a kayak after we got our first layer of skim that year. He wasn't fishing but it was still funny to see. 

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On ‎11‎/‎27‎/‎2016 at 8:16 AM, A-Jay said:

A Dry suit is really the way to go though.

A-Jay

This is the deal in the Old Town canoe when the conditions dictate ~

This Neoprene Dry Suit keeps me warm & dry.

A-Jay

DSCN5844.JPGDSCN5845.JPG

A-Jay

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On 12/6/2016 at 7:20 PM, Bunnielab said:

I have a drysuit but I almost never use it becuase my hands always get uncomfortablly cold way to fast to make the whole process worthwhile.  I have some neoprene gloves with filip up thumbs and pointer finger tips, but as soon as water gets in I freeze. 

I learned to cast a baitcaster with full fingered fleece gloves on. I went with fingerless gloves one season and got a little bit of frostbite. :o

gloves.jpg

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