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Hi everyone , I currently looking for a  universal reel, I end up with the new lews bb1, curado k, and daiwa sv tws

have anyone use any of these reels?

thank you 

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Kinda hard to say without more info. For just all around use I'd say the tatula might be a better fit than the sv variant. The SV spool tends to be a tad over braked for most applications. 

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Any of them would work.  

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You might try searching the thousands of topics already here on the board.  We have no idea what you are going to use this reel for, so any specifics is difficult to help you with. However, if you scroll up towards the top of the page there is a search box. Put in each of these reels, one at a time, and read the tons of past topics covering these reels. There you will find plenty of members asking about these reels and their explanations of what they were looking for, as well as many member's responses with their real life experiences with these reels. There is a ton of archived material you can read and make up your own mind about these reels. Then I suggest trying each reel on your rod to see what feels best.

 

For me, I prefer a 6.3-1 Daiwa Tatula CT reel for general all purpose use. I fish with many Daiwa Tatula, Tatula CT and Exceler reels.  Some are 6.3-1 and a few are 8-1. The high speed ones are used on my Flipping rod and frog rod. 

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9 hours ago, fishnkamp said:

You might try searching the thousands of topics already here on the board.  We have no idea what you are going to use this reel for, so any specifics is difficult to help you with. However, if you scroll up towards the top of the page there is a search box. Put in each of these reels, one at a time, and read the tons of past topics covering these reels. There you will find plenty of members asking about these reels and their explanations of what they were looking for, as well as many member's responses with their real life experiences with these reels. There is a ton of archived material you can read and make up your own mind about these reels. Then I suggest trying each reel on your rod to see what feels best.

 

For me, I prefer a 6.3-1 Daiwa Tatula CT reel for general all purpose use. I fish with many Daiwa Tatula, Tatula CT and Exceler reels.  Some are 6.3-1 and a few are 8-1. The high speed ones are used on my Flipping rod and frog rod. 

I wanted to throw anything from like Texas rig , jigs, spinner ,cranky bait , so like little bit of everything ,

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If I could only have one reel to do it all, it would be a 7 speed (or around 30ish) inch per turn.  Have never tried any of those models but read great things about them all.

 

From my findings, the most universally well reviewed would be the Curado.

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On 7/1/2018 at 5:04 AM, Beetlebz said:

Kinda hard to say without more info. For just all around use I'd say the tatula might be a better fit than the sv variant. The SV spool tends to be a tad over braked for most applications. 

I agree.

 

I find the SV style a waste. A full axle reel usually casts better. I am certain that the space between the shaft inside  the pinion and the axle shaft of the spool allows dirt and water to enter into the handle side of the reel. And I see no added casting range. Braking, maybe, but the distance casting reels are almost always a single axle, not free floating. Every reel I’ve ever opened with a floating (SV) spool (especially new Abu Garcia’s) had sand and dirt inside of it. It doesn’t happen with full axle reels with the same degree of tolerances.  

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CrankFate are you serious?  Have you ever touched ANY of the Daiwa models that have an SV spool?  I am certain you have not.  The entire purpose of Daiwas SV spool and its complementary braking system is to aid with lighter lures and skipping.  This design does restrict line capacity and that has to do with reducing the weight of the line and spool.  This design does not encourage dirt intrusion. And NEVER EVER consider a Daiwa designed reel to be the same as something Abu Garcia sells.

As I suggested before the OP would find a Daiwa Tatula CT in a 6.3-1 ratio a better choice for all the around use he was seeking.

My 2 jig rods, 3 of my 4 crankbait rods, the rod I use for throwing flukes, Skinny Dippers, floating worms and Sencos, and my jerkbait rod all have had their Shimano Chronarchs and Curados replaced by Daiwa Tatula Type Rs, Tatula CTs or Daiwa Exceler reels in 6.3-1.

My heavy jigs/big heavy plastics, carolina rigs, etc rod and my 2 spinnerbait & chatterbait rods all have 6.4-1 Bass Pro Extreme reels on them (next reels to be replaced). So I say from experience that the 6.3 or 6.4-1 gear ratio reels work well for all those techniques. Some anglers will only set up one rod and prefer a 7-1 reel instead. That is okay.

In my case I also carry specific rods for Flipping/Pitching and Punching as well as for frogs. These all have 8-1 Tatula Type Rs on  them. Everyone of these reels are super reliable, cast well and have good drag system on them.

 

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4 hours ago, CrankFate said:

I agree.

 

I find the SV style a waste. A full axle reel usually casts better. I am certain that the space between the shaft inside  the pinion and the axle shaft of the spool allows dirt and water to enter into the handle side of the reel. And I see no added casting range. Braking, maybe, but the distance casting reels are almost always a single axle, not free floating. Every reel I’ve ever opened with a floating (SV) spool (especially new Abu Garcia’s) had sand and dirt inside of it. It doesn’t happen with full axle reels with the same degree of tolerances.  

First of all, you're agreeing with somebody by saying a "full axle" reel casts better than an "sv Style free floating". The reel in question, the tatula SV, is a "full axle spool", not a free floating design. It is not the traditional free floating spool that daiwa uses /w it's SV spools. A free floating spool isn't an SV spool. The majority of Daiwa spools are free floating. Only a few, relative to the amount of spools Daiwa has, are SV. The SV spool has been around for 5-6 years.  Abu's aren't SV spools. Reels /w free floating spools still have a pinion shaft. It can be accessed through the CC knob. The spool just doesn't rely or seat on it like a "full axle spool". A spool that rides on a pinion or doesn't has zero effect on dirt and debris entering the reel. Neither has some sort of magical gasket keeping things in or out. If you're finding reels with sand and water in them, odds are they were dropped in sand or water. This will happen with any reel. Not every SV spool is created equal. Some cheaper, ie the SS SV, Tatula SV, are more user friendly and have more aggressive braking. To say a free floating spool doesn't cast far is nonsense. Drop a HLC, R+, or a 1016 in a reel and you'll cast further than you'll ever need to. 

 

OP, any of them will work fine. Pick the one you like holding and roll with it.

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Back to the actual question at hand, any of those reels are great performers, I would try to get them in your hands and see which is the most comfortable for you

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3 hours ago, iabass8 said:

First of all, you're agreeing with somebody by saying a "full axle" reel casts better than an "sv Style free floating". The reel in question, the tatula SV, is a "full axle spool", not a free floating design. It is not the traditional free floating spool that daiwa uses /w it's SV spools. A free floating spool isn't an SV spool. The majority of Daiwa spools are free floating. Only a few, relative to the amount of spools Daiwa has, are SV. The SV spool has been around for 5-6 years.  Abu's aren't SV spools. Reels /w free floating spools still have a pinion shaft. It can be accessed through the CC knob. The spool just doesn't rely or seat on it like a "full axle spool". A spool that rides on a pinion or doesn't has zero effect on dirt and debris entering the reel. Neither has some sort of magical gasket keeping things in or out. If you're finding reels with sand and water in them, odds are they were dropped in sand or water. This will happen with any reel. Not every SV spool is created equal. Some cheaper, ie the SS SV, Tatula SV, are more user friendly and have more aggressive braking. To say a free floating spool doesn't cast far is nonsense. Drop a HLC, R+, or a 1016 in a reel and you'll cast further than you'll ever need to. 

 

OP, any of them will work fine. Pick the one you like holding and roll with it.

I don’t know, anything I have ever fished with the separate shaft in the pinion gets dirty inside. I spent about an hour and a half getting all the dirt out of my Revo Inshore last night. I think the grooves on the shaft that seem to have no real purpose are there to keep things out.

 

EDIT: I thought the SV spool is on a short axle with a shaft in the pinion. And that’s why I wouldn’t get one, since there are shallow spools available for all daiwa reels. If it doesn’t have a shaft in the pinion—forget it. Then I’m wrong.

 

i thought there was a pinion shaft because all images of the spool look like these:

 

AB4B1AFF-1407-4957-AEFB-104826C76A98.jpeg

E9B4443E-B355-469A-B8BB-CEF8BD486F64.jpeg

 

And the non SV Tatula spools look like this:

 

958BE9D8-BF13-451A-8696-B2DC657DBE4E.jpeg

 

When i I see part 66 in the schematic below, I go with the CT over the SV

 

 

F8EDA7EC-6C9F-4748-A73D-E54B0E5605AE.jpeg

 

If you look at that shaft number 66 it doesn’t have the machining the CT spool has, I think that lets particulate matter into the handle side of the reel.

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I can’t speak to Lew’s cause I never owned one.  As far as Shimano and Daiwa, I think they’re both high quality reels.  But you can find Daiwas at  a discount on Amazon and Ebay while Shimano tightly controls the pricing of their reels.  Advantage Daiwa.  Jmho

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Not used the BB1, but have a Tournament Pro, Tournament MB and Pro Z.  Not used the Curado K, but have Curado 51 and 201E7.  I assume you are talking about the Tatula SV.  That I have.  Some people have complained about the lower line capacity of the SV and about it not being the best long distance caster.  For me it holds more 12# than I will ever use.  I get good distance.  I doubt I will ever be able to spool a reel.  If shooting for the moon, I would grab a different reel.  As already stated it does have heavier braking which is an asset with some techniques.  And for newbies.

 

Everything I read tells me you can't go wrong with any of those 3 reels.  Try each on a rod and see what feels best to you.

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16 hours ago, CrankFate said:

 

And the non SV Tatula spools look like this:

 

958BE9D8-BF13-451A-8696-B2DC657DBE4E.jpeg

 

 

The SV Tatula spool loos like this also with the attached spool shaft...its not a free floating spool.

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17 hours ago, CrankFate said:

If you look at that shaft number 66 it doesn’t have the machining the CT spool has, I think that lets particulate matter into the handle side of the reel.

That part is covered by the cast control knob, that is threaded onto the crank side and sealed with an O-ring.  You'd know this if you took ANY Daiwa casting reel apart.

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I can only comment on the Curado K and compare it to my Curado 100B, Curado 200E7, Citica 200E, Curado 200I, Chronarch CI4 and the Chronarch MGL and can verify that the K is one sweet reel.  I cannot think of anything you could not do with that reel and the micro gears are really, really nice.  I tend to buy all my reels the fastest there is in each model and at 8.5:1 on the K you get it back in a hurry.

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On 7/3/2018 at 12:09 PM, iabass8 said:

The SV Tatula spool loos like this also with the attached spool shaft...its not a free floating spool.

Not according to the schematics.

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1 minute ago, CrankFate said:

Not according to the schematics.

Wrong again.

 

 

 

spool2.thumb.png.9680ada29ec7bae9e189b7e4d888d89b.png

 

image.png.afbf0b009d6acb80eda490ff2306f478.png

 

I also own one...

 

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On 7/3/2018 at 12:28 PM, J Francho said:

That part is covered by the cast control knob, that is threaded onto the crank side and sealed with an O-ring.  You'd know this if you took ANY Daiwa casting reel apart.

None in mine. And the part doesn’t appear in the schematic.

2 minutes ago, iabass8 said:

Wrong again.

 

 

 

spool2.thumb.png.9680ada29ec7bae9e189b7e4d888d89b.png

 

image.png.afbf0b009d6acb80eda490ff2306f478.png

 

I also own one...

 

It means that some versions had this and some don’t, I am guessing by year.

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7 minutes ago, CrankFate said:

None in mine. And the part doesn’t appear in the schematic.

It means that some versions had this and some don’t, I am guessing by year.

I literally just posted a picture of the schematic for you. I can even take a picture of the physical reel if you want. 

 

The tatula SV is THE ONLY SV SPOOL THAT HAS THE LONG SHAFT.  It always has and always will. EVERY single other SV variant spool is free floating EXCEPT the Tatula SV. There is only ONE version of the spool and the above pictured is the ONLY one that there is. 

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7 minutes ago, CrankFate said:

None in mine. And the part doesn’t appear in the schematic.

It's part of the crank side cover, and doesn't appear in any parts diagrams.  At any rate, I can't say for sure why you're getting dirt in your reels.  It's not normal at all.

7 minutes ago, CrankFate said:

It means that some versions had this and some don’t, I am guessing by year.

Sorry, but This is not true.

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4 minutes ago, J Francho said:

It's part of the crank side cover, and doesn't appear in any parts diagrams.  At any rate, I can't say for sure why you're getting dirt in your reels.  It's not normal at all.

This is not true.

Yeah, I see that schematic above is not for the Tatula. Oh well.....

 

it actuallyshkws the long shaft on the daiwa website. I thought the SV had the short axle. 

2619BF4C-8819-45A6-8AC4-389EEF82E14C.png

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2 minutes ago, CrankFate said:

Yeah, I see that schematic above is not for the Tatula. Oh well.....

It literally says "Tatula SV" in huge bold letters....

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2 minutes ago, iabass8 said:

It literally says "Tatula SV" in huge bold letters....

No I meant the one I posted. I see the long shaft on the daiwa website.

 

But in this case I’m still glad I skipped the SV, since the main difference that makes it SV is just the lighter spool. The after market spools are even lighter.

 

E0A37305-34A9-4AE5-94F6-0A6D20253E49.png

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