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How do you guys fish algae? All the ponds around me have been overrun by this slimy green algae. It’s not just on the surface either. It’s spread out all through the water column. 

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weightless plastics t-rigged and hollow body top water frogs(or weightless t-rigged frogs like the rage toad). if the algae is too thick for your weightless lures to fall in it, then maybe peg a small bullet weight

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Hollow bodied frogs. Just make sure that you have a stout rod and reel and use at least 50 pound braid. I've had bass blow up on baits even through the thick stuff and suddenly that 4 pound bass becomes 7-10 pounds with all of that algae.

 

Although not always possible, when I fish locations like this I always try to find clear spots where I can try and steer the fish and then land the fish.

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Thanks guys. I’ll try frogs as soon as I get my new batch from TW.

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I don’t, I go somewhere else!

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Algae is a bad sign for a lake. However if you choose to ignore it, try a live frog. Keep it natural 

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On 7/3/2018 at 10:30 AM, SnailsYeast said:

How do you guys fish algae? All the ponds around me have been overrun by this slimy green algae. It’s not just on the surface either. It’s spread out all through the water column. 

In my best Ty Webb voice; "see the goop, embrace the goop, BE... the goop!"

 

Depending on how much and how thick it is, there are various approcahes and lures that I find work best. Sure at some point a frog or weightless ti-rigged plastic become the only options, but I find that a spinnerbait, and popper snaked around the clumps can be effective. The wind will concentrate or disperse it, so stay flexible. I find in a couple of spots, bass will sit under the stuff, and I can pitch to them or run something passed them. Also there is a technique to getting the stuff off your lure and line (and hands, and reel and guides, and everything else) that you just fall into and becomes second nature. It's totally annoying I know, and  I would love not to fish around the stuff, but fish seem to like it, so there's that. The last thing is when the shore is covered in it, as it often is this time of year, and you have some open water beyond, reel the lure in quickly to within a few inches of it, then snap the lure up over your head while turning sideways and reeling in the slack. After a while, the lure won't touch the ground behind you, and you'll be ready for the next cast in a fluid motion (unless you hook yoursef of course). Do you do drugs Danny? :)

 

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11 hours ago, reason said:

In my best Ty Webb voice; "see the goop, embrace the goop, BE... the goop!"

 

Depending on how much and how thick it is, there are various approcahes and lures that I find work best. Sure at some point a frog or weightless ti-rigged plastic become the only options, but I find that a spinnerbait, and popper snaked around the clumps can be effective. The wind will concentrate or disperse it, so stay flexible. I find in a couple of spots, bass will sit under the stuff, and I can pitch to them or run something passed them. Also there is a technique to getting the stuff off your lure and line (and hands, and reel and guides, and everything else) that you just fall into and becomes second nature. It's totally annoying I know, and  I would love not to fish around the stuff, but fish seem to like it, so there's that. The last thing is when the shore is covered in it, as it often is this time of year, and you have some open water beyond, reel the lure in quickly to within a few inches of it, then snap the lure up over your head while turning sideways and reeling in the slack. After a while, the lure won't touch the ground behind you, and you'll be ready for the next cast in a fluid motion (unless you hook yoursef of course). Do you do drugs Danny? :)

 

Do you usually find the fish to be under the slop or more in open water? The small ponds seem to be the most affected. 

 

On 7/3/2018 at 11:17 PM, Mottel said:

Algae is a bad sign for a lake. However if you choose to ignore it, try a live frog. Keep it natural 

A live frog? How would you rig that thing?

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6 hours ago, SnailsYeast said:

Do you usually find the fish to be under the slop or more in open water? The small ponds seem to be the most affected. 

 

A live frog? How would you rig that thing?

The algae (and everything else) is just one factor, so it really depends on what else is present, like the bottom composition, contours, weather, water clarity, bait, etc. But generally they will relate to it mid day, and wander about a bit more early and late. If you have small clumps or islands, try those. If you have solid areas, fish parallel, or a frog over it. Small ponds can get totally choked with the stuff, but hey peoples' grass looks awesome.

 

Haven't fished live frogs in a while, but hook it though one lip if you want it to swim towards you, and the inside of one leg close to the body if you want it to swim away from you. Oh, and if you tie one with about a foot of 20 lb mono and secure it to the ground near the shore with a tent stake, you can use a snake for bait in the morning.

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Never tried the frogs in it but they should work fine . Weightless worms on stout gear works good . Make sure to use a heavy hook . Senko type worms have enough heft to be cast well without weight .

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On 7/5/2018 at 8:07 AM, scaleface said:

Never tried the frogs in it but they should work fine . Weightless worms on stout gear works good . Make sure to use a heavy hook . Senko type worms have enough heft to be cast well without weight .

Do you mean to say that I can throw a Senko (on a baitcaster) without any weight at all on the hook itself or any bullet weight?? Does the Senko really have that weight on its own?

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Just now, Mottel said:

Do you mean to say that I can throw a Senko (on a baitcaster) without any weight at all on the hook itself or any bullet weight?? Does the Senko really have that weight on its own?

Yes .

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Just now, scaleface said:

Yes .

But I use weighted hooks that that have screws to hold in the Senko. I couldn’t find any non weighted hooks that also have screws. How then, do you keep the Senko from falling off the hook? Whats holding it on if there’s no screw?

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6 minutes ago, Mottel said:

But I use weighted hooks that that have screws to hold in the Senko. I couldn’t find any non weighted hooks that also have screws. How then, do you keep the Senko from falling off the hook? Whats holding it on if there’s no screw?

There are a lot of worm hooks . Google offset worm hooks .  For fishing in vegetation you will want a heavy hook like a 4.0. All hook manufacturers make them .

Look at Yutube videos .I would supply a link but dont know if thats allowed .

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