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LuffDaddy

Keep bait straight on straight shank

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Hey BR! I'm having a very frustrating issue that I'm sure there's a simple answer to because I can't find anyone else complaining about it lol. When I Texas rig a craw or hug with a straight shank flippin hook, I can't seem to keep the bait straight! Either I have to go in at angle at the top, which obviously won't sit in line with the punch weight. Or if I go straight in, you have to kinda bend the bait to get the hook into it. I feel so dumb with this one..... 🤦‍♂️🤷‍♂️😂🤣🤡

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Congrats for using the great straight shank hook. I find them endlessly more effective than offsets and wide gaps.

 

So, I understand your issue. What I might try is pushing on your nose weight, then follow up with one of the appropriate sized rubber bobber stoppers, then tie on your hook and bait it. Pull the bobber stopper down but not tight to the hook, maybe a 1/16th of gap.

 

I think that'd create a slightly loose hook that would unbind that angle issue you are having. Too, it might let your plastic move and swing more freely and attract an extra bite or two.

 

Brad

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18 minutes ago, Brad Reid said:

Congrats for using the great straight shank hook. I find them endlessly more effective than offsets and wide gaps.

^^^So true^^^

 

The bait doesn’t have to be in a straight line with the punch weight. Mine usually aren’t, and it seems not to make any difference in its weedless properties. It’s more important that the bait is straight on the hook. Yes, pegging the weight certainly helps with that issue, but pegging is usually used for flipping to short range targets. 

 

One other her important thing to mention is tying a snell rather than a clinch knot. This will also help line up the weight with you bait, but much more importantly, it hugely increases your hookup ratio. There is an Ike vid on YouTube about Snelling and he explains why it’s important. Check it out. 

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I'm glad you asked this question, because I'd like to know the answer, too.

 

i'm pretty sure the same concept applies to using any straight shank, such as a Roboworm rebarb.  Or does it?  

 

Don't want to hijack the thread, but the two seem to be related.  Interested to hear more from the straight shank experts.

 

Google "straight shank hook punch weight" [images] and you can see what @IgotWood is talking about:

13 minutes ago, IgotWood said:

The bait doesn’t have to be in a straight line with the punch weight. Mine usually aren’t

  

Maybe there is a video out there from @Glenn that I haven't seen on this.

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7 minutes ago, IgotWood said:

^^^So true^^^

 

The bait doesn’t have to be in a straight line with the punch weight. Mine usually aren’t, and it seems not to make any difference in its weedless properties. It’s more important that the bait is straight on the hook. Yes, pegging the weight certainly helps with that issue, but pegging is usually used for flipping to short range targets. 

 

One other her important thing to mention is tying a snell rather than a clinch knot. This will also help line up the weight with you bait, but much more importantly, it hugely increases your hookup ratio. There is an Ike vid on YouTube about Snelling and he explains why it’s important. Check it out. 

I actually do these things already, I think I'm just being way over concerned with it. I just went out and tried it with the slight bend and landed a 5 pounder with no issues. Thanks for the replies. 

F48CECF1-F6AA-4A00-9D93-16797AA50F57.jpeg

425B4C09-9A38-4E61-9A1A-457A054E8394.jpeg

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15 minutes ago, IgotWood said:

 

One other her important thing to mention is tying a snell rather than a clinch knot. This will also help line up the weight with you bait, but much more importantly, it hugely increases your hookup ratio. 

When rigging with a straight shank hook, enter the nose of the bait on a 45degree angle. Push through and turn 180. The hook point is now at 45 to the body and that is the angle you want to re-enter on. 

Don’t concern yourself with the weight not being in-line as, with the snell knot, that is what gives the cam action to the hook set. 

With worms and other soft plastics that you’re not rigging with a snell knot, cover the hook eye with the bait’s nose and your bullet weight will rest against the nose.

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1 minute ago, LuffDaddy said:

I actually do these things already, I think I'm just being way over concerned with it. I just went out and tried it with the slight bend and landed a 5 pounder with no issues. Thanks for the replies. 

F48CECF1-F6AA-4A00-9D93-16797AA50F57.jpeg

425B4C09-9A38-4E61-9A1A-457A054E8394.jpeg

He was actually 4 pounds before everyone starts calling me out hahaha 

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This is the best I've been able to do and its working fine. What do you guys think?

95D3D6CE-22C3-4CE9-A837-D29692109DED.jpeg

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I don’t know if it matters but if you start by putting the hook through the bait in the center of the nose the bait will be more centered with the weight. 

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2 hours ago, Derek1 said:

I don’t know if it matters but if you start by putting the hook through the bait in the center of the nose the bait will be more centered with the weight. 

I actually did, the weight just ends up pushing it over like that once you bring it down 🤷‍♂️. I'm thinking it just is what it is 

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Look at the pic I don’t think the weight will ever line up . I think that maybe if you pull the eye of the hook down into the bat a little bit. Then run a tooth pic through the bait and eye of the hook. Cut off flush then peg your weight on the nose of the bait. I saw Glenn use the toothpick in one of his videos. 

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Well, what I was speaking about would be to push the nose weight on first, then push on a rubber-type bobber stopper. Let the bobber stopper lodge inside the nose weight in a place up the line where you leave a tiny gap so that the hook and its attached plastic swing a bit loose.

 

No, on a drop shot, I use a Roboworm Rebarb hook almost exclusively and it is not an issue, at all, since there is no nose weight.

 

I do what has already been recommended by pushing the hook down through a roboworm on a bias of about 45 degrees, then bring it up but leave it embedded in the worm. It sits there ready to pounce!

 

Brad

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So yeah I'm just stupid..... I was staring at a flippin hook when it hit me like a eureka moment! (Even though I know it should've been common sense hahaha) I think of a keeper like an old school bait keeper for nightcrawlers, so I kept stubbornly thinking the keeper stays IN THE BAIT. Then I realized the two barbs actually sit flush at a 45 degree angle and I just had to pull the keeper THROUGH the bait so it was on the OUTSIDE OF THE BAIT... 🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️ 

0A5779F1-D4FF-4483-B3BB-A36A0002191B.jpeg

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I use straight shank worm hook most of the time. If you are having a problem with the worm not being straight try laying the hook on the worm with the hook eye about 1/16" inside the nose end and hook point where you want after rigging. Note the angle the shank is and where the shank exits the worm nose end and hook bend is located on the worm belly. Duplicate the hook position by inserting the point into worm nose at the appropriate angle exiting the nose where it did, pull the hook eye and line knot after rotating the hook into the nose about 1/16", then pull the hook down the shank so the point will enter the worm belly where the hook bend should end up. 

Little practice it becomes second nature. 

The mistake most anglers do is inserting the hook eye too far back onto the worm nose, this causes the worm to hump up when the bullet weight hits the worm nose.

Tom

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14 minutes ago, WRB said:

I use straight shank worm hook most of the time. If you are having a problem with the worm not being straight try laying the hook on the worm with the hook eye about 1/16" inside the nose end and hook point where you want after rigging. Note the angle the shank is and where the shank exits the worm nose end and hook bend is located on the worm belly. Duplicate the hook position by inserting the point into worm nose at the appropriate angle exiting the nose where it did, pull the hook eye and line knot after rotating the hook into the nose about 1/16", then pull the hook down the shank so the point will enter the worm belly where the hook bend should end up. 

Little practice it becomes second nature. 

The mistake most anglers do is inserting the hook eye too far back onto the worm nose, this causes the worm to hump up when the bullet weight hits the worm nose.

Tom

I guess you didn't read the whole post? 😂😂😂 

 

Thanks for the advice though!

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I didn't read or look at your last post showing the punch rig.

Tom

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On 11/24/2018 at 9:28 PM, 187yak said:

Look at the pic I don’t think the weight will ever line up . I think that maybe if you pull the eye of the hook down into the bat a little bit. Then run a tooth pic through the bait and eye of the hook. Cut off flush then peg your weight on the nose of the bait. I saw Glenn use the toothpick in one of his videos. 

You are actually pretty much right except you don't need the toothpick. I tugged HARD on the bait and that keeper is actually insanely good. I can't believe I didn't realize the design from the get go. Makes perfect sense. A heavy, dull barb facing back at the bait and a smaller one opposite of it. I've seen most pics of flippin hooks with the same design and I can see why now!

5 minutes ago, WRB said:

I didn't read or look at your last post showing the punch rig.

Tom

I figured, I was just busting your chops. No hard feelings I hope!

48CD4B31-FE7B-4CA7-BECB-209A94793F23.jpeg

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Point your middle finger paralell to the floor, then lift your index finger up, the angle is about 30 degrees, close to your hook shank angler, not 45 degrees.

Tom

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10 hours ago, WRB said:

Point your middle finger paralell to the floor, then lift your index finger up, the angle is about 30 degrees, close to your hook shank angler, not 45 degrees.

Tom

Seriously? 😂😂

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