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snake95

Damiki Rig

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I've been reading and watching videos about the Damiki Rig, and looking for a little help understanding.

 

I'm not so much hung up on what the "right" way to fish it is, just want to learn more about effective ways to fish it.  I'm focused more on defining it by the lure than by the technique.

 

By the Damiki Rig, I mean an aspirn-head jig with the tie at about 90 degrees to the shank, with a small soft plastic, typically less than about 3.5 inches.

 

1) I've heard about both cold/deep water "video game" fishing with it, and casting/slow hopping and dragging right on bottom, AND it looks like you could let it fall and flutter, then pull like a straight-retrieve Ned Rig.

 

Are all valid approaches for fishing this particular "rig"?

 

2) Favorite jigs and weights.  Seems like anglers used jigs in the 3/8-1/2 range for lots of the deeper water applications.  But looks like at 1/4 or 1/16 would be fine for shallow water.

 

What size(s) do you like, for which techniques?

 

3) Advantages of various bait styles?  Seems like tiny Kietech swing impacts would work, but maybe too much action vs a tiny fluke?

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

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Instead of a Keitech Swing Impact with its paddle tail, I'd recommend you try Keitech's Shad Impact which has a straight tail, more of a soft plastic jerk bait. It'd work fine for this presentation.

 

There are other plastics, for sure, but all Keitechs are great, of the highest quality.

 

A really good winter presentation. Let us know how you do if you get a chance to report back!

 

Brad

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It works great both video game fishing and casting at the bank. You want the heavier jig heads for the vertical dropping (at least to start with) and the lighter jig heads for casting. I like a 2.5 inch gulp minnow on 1/8 oz for casting. Just let it pendulum and hang on!! For watching the graph a heavier head will get the bait where you want it quicker and pick off the most agressive fish. If this doesn't work after a while you may need to downsize. This method has nearly taken over winter fishing in the highland reservoirs in my area. Check out the coverage from the 2018 bassmaster elite series tournament on Cherokee lake in February

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It's called vertical jigging and it's been around the walleye circle for decades. Watch some youtube videos on vertical jigging and it will explain it a lot better. 

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I have made a lot of anglers "Damiki rig" jigs over the years and I was told about it long before most heard of it. The name comes from the bait used, the Damiki Armor Shad and the one thing critical with the bait is that it doesn't exceed 3". Now, it other parts of the country that may be different but you may want to talk to elite series pro Jamie Hartman, he couldn't get bit on a drop shot on Cherokee lake but he was able to catch them on the Damiki rig. You don't cast the rig or hop it along the bottom or swim it, it is a vertical jigging technique in which you simply drop the rig to where you see the fish on your graph and then let it sit there, little to no movement. It is cool/cold water technique that I was told is not used much, if at all, outside the winter months. Iabass8 is spot on when he mentions it has been around for years in the walleye anglers arsenal and I actually have a DVD from 2002 showing James Lindner fishing a fluke on a jig head in the same manner for smallmouth up in Ontario.  It is very effective but nothing really special except that it has been dialed in on certain lakes in which a 3" fluke style bait is attached to 3/8oz to 1/2oz Erie, Aspirin, or Mnnow head jig with a size 1 or 1/0 light wire hook and then sat semi motionless in front of fish in a vertical manner.  When the elite series guys were fishing Cherokee lake Randy Howell had custom Erie jigs made with a 3/0 Gamakatsu hook because he didn't like the small hooks on what was made locally and it was that critical that he not only missed the cut but he never got a bite on the rig while others around him in the same area were catching good fish with no issue. The reason is because the hook and bait size is very important in those lakes where it is a winter staple, I'm sure in other parts of the country a larger bait fished on a different head style will work but the lakes where this rig became famous is because it is refined down to a specific bait on specific jig heads fished a specific way and it is not cast, trolled, hopped along the bottom or swam, it is a vertical technique plain and simple.

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@smalljaw67 couldn’t have described the entire technique any better. It’s crazy how picky they will be 

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