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How many feet of braid on a baitcaster

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Looking to spool up some new reels and some old ones and trying to figure out how much line I should put on. I picked up a couple of 300 yd spools of 832 if I went with 150 feet on each I could spool up 6 reels. Does that seem about right? Thinking of walleye trolling I don't let out much more than 100 feet very often, not sure how far I truly can cast bass plugs.

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Look at the braid's line test and check it against what the reel has printed on it for line test/yards.

 

Then, put some mono as backing and tie the braid to the mono backing. You can use as much mono backing as you want with the understanding that it is going to count against the reel's maximum yardage.

 

You may want to glue the braid to the mono knot for extra strength. Not much glue. Get a fast drying glue with an applicator and use that. Apply a little to the knot and let it dry 100%.

 

Don't go overboard with the mono. Just enough to keep the braid from slipping. Enough to cover the spool a few times.

 

Then spool the braid onto the reel and having the braid stop between an 1/8 to 1/4 inch from the top of the reel.

 

It is almost impossible to estimate the amount of line you are putting on your reel unless you have a really good line counter. The ones in the marketplace today are not that accurate. So your guess is as good as mine.

 

You could measure the distance in yards from your entry door to your closet door in your man cave and then take the braid and tie it to the door knob and then run it to the other door knob, circle the knob, and go back and forth between doors until you have the amount of yardage you need. You know, if the doors are 12 feet apart, you have 4 yards, then 8 yards, then 12, then 16, then 20, etc.

 

Do this in private because anyone seeing you doing this will think you lost your mind.

 

My cousins and I used to walk the line around my aunt's house to measure it, going room by room until we figured we had the right yardage. I don't do that anymore as I a married and my wife would not appreciate it.

 

Just a suggestion.

 

Happy New Year!

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28 minutes ago, Sam said:

Look at the braid's line test and check it against what the reel has printed on it for line test/yards.

 

Then, put some mono as backing and tie the braid to the mono backing. You can use as much mono backing as you want with the understanding that it is going to count against the reel's maximum yardage.

 

You may want to glue the braid to the mono knot for extra strength. Not much glue. Get a fast drying glue with an applicator and use that. Apply a little to the knot and let it dry 100%.

 

Don't go overboard with the mono. Just enough to keep the braid from slipping. Enough to cover the spool a few times.

 

Then spool the braid onto the reel and having the braid stop between an 1/8 to 1/4 inch from the top of the reel.

 

It is almost impossible to estimate the amount of line you are putting on your reel unless you have a really good line counter. The ones in the marketplace today are not that accurate. So your guess is as good as mine.

 

You could measure the distance in yards from your entry door to your closet door in your man cave and then take the braid and tie it to the door knob and then run it to the other door knob, circle the knob, and go back and forth between doors until you have the amount of yardage you need. You know, if the doors are 12 feet apart, you have 4 yards, then 8 yards, then 12, then 16, then 20, etc.

 

Do this in private because anyone seeing you doing this will think you lost your mind.

 

My cousins and I used to walk the line around my aunt's house to measure it, going room by room until we figured we had the right yardage. I don't do that anymore as I a married and my wife would not appreciate it.

 

Just a suggestion.

 

Happy New Year!

One thing I have done too to minimize backlash damage and not have the connection knot screw up the line coming off he reel is put a small piece of duct tape over it as the knot is spooled on. This does seem to help with casting, especially on spinning reels where lighter line is used.

3 minutes ago, GReb said:

Line counters are 10-15 bucks

Yeah I have 3 of them I use when walleye trolling and have used them to spool up reels before. I figure it will get me in the ballpark when spooling up, not perfect but close enough. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't shorting myself with 150 feet.

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23 minutes ago, cgolf said:

One thing I have done too to minimize backlash damage and not have the connection knot screw up the line coming off he reel is put a small piece of duct tape over it as the knot is spooled on. This does seem to help with casting, especially on spinning reels where lighter line is used.

Yeah I have 3 of them I use when walleye trolling and have used them to spool up reels before. I figure it will get me in the ballpark when spooling up, not perfect but close enough. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't shorting myself with 150 feet.

cgolf, yes, you can get a line counter for that price but I have found them to be difficult to use and they are not accurate. They will give you an idea of the yards. I like my method better using the two door knobs. At least I know the variance and can take that into consideration.

 

Another method I have used is going into my field with the rods and reels set up with the baits and casting as far as I can. I then walk along to where the lure landed and count off yards using my stride. Not perfect but like you said, it gives you an idea of the yards you have spooled on the reel.

 

The duct tape - Scotch tape trick is an old one and it works. You can do this to stop backlashes, too, by casting out and then putting the duct tape or Scotch tape across the line on your spool.

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Wow, 150 feet gives you half a football field to troll, or anything else you wish to do.  I only use 120 ft of 50lb Sufix 832 on my frog rod (the only reel with braid) and it is quite adequate.

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3 hours ago, cgolf said:

Looking to spool up some new reels and some old ones and trying to figure out how much line I should put on. I picked up a couple of 300 yd spools of 832 if I went with 150 feet on each I could spool up 6 reels. Does that seem about right? Thinking of walleye trolling I don't let out much more than 100 feet very often, not sure how far I truly can cast bass plugs.

What lb test? Reel spool capacity is dependant on line diameter. Look at your reels spool capacity, usually listed as mono line by lb test, then look at the diameter of your braid compared to the mono diameter.

Tom

PS, TW list Suffix braid diameter with a mono lb test conversion. 

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Most of my bass reels have 65 yards of main line and whatever amount of backing needed to have a full spool. I don’t think 50 yards is enough for some rigs but 65 seems to do well even if I have a break off .

 

i measure out 65 yards of main line and spool the reel, tie on backing and fill up the spool.  Remove all the line and spool up from the backing end first.   Time consuming the first time but when it’s time to replace the main line you strip it down the the backing knot , tie on new line and spool back up. 

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I can't be the only one that loads the spool with line until it's near the top?

I couldn't even guess how much line is on there nor have I tried.

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1 hour ago, Dens228 said:

I can't be the only one that loads the spool with line until it's near the top?

I couldn't even guess how much line is on there nor have I tried.

I used to and then I ended up with a bunch of spools that had wasted line on them. For the big game mono backing, no worries, but for more expensive braid I wasn't feeling great about throwing away that much line. At least with flouro you can use it for leader material.

3 hours ago, jbrew73 said:

Most of my bass reels have 65 yards of main line and whatever amount of backing needed to have a full spool. I don’t think 50 yards is enough for some rigs but 65 seems to do well even if I have a break off .

 

i measure out 65 yards of main line and spool the reel, tie on backing and fill up the spool.  Remove all the line and spool up from the backing end first.   Time consuming the first time but when it’s time to replace the main line you strip it down the the backing knot , tie on new line and spool back up. 

Somehow my reply got lost lol. Gonna go with 60 yards and get 5 reels out of one spool and do it backwards like you mentioned to get the backing right. Would just hate to throw 40 yds of line away which would happen if I did 65 yds a reel.

 

On my 150 yard spool will just do 75 on 2 reels and call it a day.

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Don't forget you can use braid TWICE. When it starts to fade you can spool it back up backward and have the fresh line on the outside with the old line inside. Braid has no memory...

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22 minutes ago, Big Rick said:

Don't forget you can use braid TWICE. When it starts to fade you can spool it back up backward and have the fresh line on the outside with the old line inside. Braid has no memory...

Working on that, pulling some line off an old retired reel to respool another reel. Also the reels with the pretty old braid on them now, if the back half looks good, I will just flip it. The three new reels get the new line.

 

Braid and fireline is awesome stuff, it seems to last a really long time on a reel and not lose any braking strength.

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Nothing worse than seeing backing at the end of a cast.  I try to use more braid than you ever expect to need.  Don't skimp. 

 

40 or so yards of backing (10 lb test), then braid.

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Cgolf,

     A lot has to do with the diameter of braid your putting on. If your planning on putting on 20# braid (6lb mono equivalent) your Curado 200K will hold a metric poop ton or probably close to 200 yards of 20# braid(not saying you have a Curado K just used as an example). If you use 50# briad it will hold about a 110 yards. But look at the diameters of your braid and compare it to the amount of mono your reel specification shows how much line it will hold.  You should get a good approximation of how much the reel will hold and guide you on how much to spool. I wouldn't get fixated by a exact number. I spool my baitcasters about 50/50. 50% mono backing and then fill with braid.

    There is no way with the information given, meaning the reel specs (how much does it hold) and brands of mono backing/lb test of braided lines that are going to be used that an accurate answer can be provided.

     I try to match my mono diameter with the braid diameter I am spooling or at least get it somewhat close. I'd look at your 150' goal per reel. You might be short changing yourself.  WRB has it spot on his post match up your line diameters and you should get pretty close.  Or just go to the football field with a friend. 

G'luck,

Fishingmickey

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1 hour ago, Big Rick said:

Don't forget you can use braid TWICE. When it starts to fade you can spool it back up backward and have the fresh line on the outside with the old line inside. Braid has no memory...

Braid that has faded isn't necessarily bad.  Most braid doesn't retain color well at all.  I've used braid that had turned almost white with no problems.  If I am using braid, I am almost always throwing back into lily pads.

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So I took my longest casting reel, Lews Crush, that I never came close to casting into the backing and I will up that number by 10 yards and call it a day. 

 

I guess my problem is I am cheap and analytical so I hate the idea of wasting line so I like the numbers to equal full spool usage. I honestly didn’t expect this topic to generate so many replies I tough it was a simple answer;) 

 

Also just learned the Abus hold 35 more yards of line than the Lews. I was right around 50/50 on the Lews. Figure if I get 120 to 130 on the Abu reels I will be good and I will be around 50/50. The jerkbait/topwater reel I may go more backing and a length similar to the Crush because these are shorter presentations for me vs bomb casts with the other 2.

 

Thanks for all the replies. 

 

 

 

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60-75 yards of braid should be plenty to bury the splice knot and leave some for re-tying. I can't see spooling on yards of expensive line that will never see the light of day. 

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10 hours ago, jbrew73 said:

Most of my bass reels have 65 yards of main line and whatever amount of backing needed to have a full spool. I don’t think 50 yards is enough for some rigs but 65 seems to do well even if I have a break off .

 

i measure out 65 yards of main line and spool the reel, tie on backing and fill up the spool.  Remove all the line and spool up from the backing end first.   Time consuming the first time but when it’s time to replace the main line you strip it down the the backing knot , tie on new line and spool back up. 

 

I did this and it ended up being pretty close. Only thing I noticed was with the braid on top it filled up a touch more, maybe from the tape over the back to back uni knot. I will say that it is tedious and took forever. Since I don’t have to do it to often it is better to get it right. 

 

13 hours ago, Sam said:

Look at the braid's line test and check it against what the reel has printed on it for line test/yards.

 

Then, put some mono as backing and tie the braid to the mono backing. You can use as much mono backing as you want with the understanding that it is going to count against the reel's maximum yardage.

 

You may want to glue the braid to the mono knot for extra strength. Not much glue. Get a fast drying glue with an applicator and use that. Apply a little to the knot and let it dry 100%.

 

Don't go overboard with the mono. Just enough to keep the braid from slipping. Enough to cover the spool a few times.

 

Then spool the braid onto the reel and having the braid stop between an 1/8 to 1/4 inch from the top of the reel.

 

It is almost impossible to estimate the amount of line you are putting on your reel unless you have a really good line counter. The ones in the marketplace today are not that accurate. So your guess is as good as mine.

 

You could measure the distance in yards from your entry door to your closet door in your man cave and then take the braid and tie it to the door knob and then run it to the other door knob, circle the knob, and go back and forth between doors until you have the amount of yardage you need. You know, if the doors are 12 feet apart, you have 4 yards, then 8 yards, then 12, then 16, then 20, etc.

 

Do this in private because anyone seeing you doing this will think you lost your mind.

 

My cousins and I used to walk the line around my aunt's house to measure it, going room by room until we figured we had the right yardage. I don't do that anymore as I a married and my wife would not appreciate it.

 

Just a suggestion.

 

Happy New Year!

 

I ended up taping it to a bench and walking it to a spot measured 15 feet away. Then I would tape where it was at the 15 ft mark and wound the previous 15 feet onto a second spool. 15 feet works good for figuring out how much line I am spoooling up. 

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7 hours ago, cgolf said:

I used to and then I ended up with a bunch of spools that had wasted line on them. For the big game mono backing, no worries, but for more expensive braid I wasn't feeling great about throwing away that much line. At least with flouro you can use it for leader material.

Somehow my reply got lost lol. Gonna go with 60 yards and get 5 reels out of one spool and do it backwards like you mentioned to get the backing right. Would just hate to throw 40 yds of line away which would happen if I did 65 yds a reel.

 

On my 150 yard spool will just do 75 on 2 reels and call it a day.

A lot of my line is on 200 yard spools so 65 x’s 3 reels works nicely.  I can’t quite get by doing 50 yards on some reels but on others it would be plenty.  

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All you guys are wrong.

 

Analytically speaking

Filling a spool up all the way with braid will use less braid in the long run.

 

If a reel holds 100 yards of braid for a full spool thats 300feet you use the line til it gets low on the spool then backfill with mono as line gets used you get to about 100' and the connection knot so time to replace, you waste only 100'.

 

Now if you start with 150' of braid with filler mono and line gets used and you replace at same 100' mark you will do this twice per 300' 100yrd spool. Wasting in total 200' feet of braid in the long run.

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, QUAKEnSHAKE said:

All you guys are wrong.

 

Analytically speaking

Filling a spool up all the way with braid will use less braid in the long run.

 

If a reel holds 100 yards of braid for a full spool thats 300feet you use the line til it gets low on the spool then backfill with mono as line gets used you get to about 100' and the connection knot so time to replace, you waste only 100'.

 

Now if you start with 150' of braid with filler mono and line gets used and you replace at same 100' mark you will do this twice per 300' 100yrd spool. Wasting in total 200' feet of braid in the long run.

 

 

 

Maybe, but I do have some reels with 10 year old power pro on it that I feel I got my money out of. The only thing with starting with 150, if you flip the line at some point before it’s too short you end up using all of the line. That would hold true for your scenario as well. 

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I must respectfully disagree that line counters are inaccurate.  They are not precision for sure, but I have worn out three in the last 15 years and the line they have saved me has more than paid for them.  In addition, they have enabled me to record on the original spool the amount I have used and it always comes out pretty darn close to the spool quantity.  OK, call me a cheap skate, but I do not have to throw away a spool with line, but not quite enough line to use.  It takes a minute to clamp it on the rod in a reverse direction and go.

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16 minutes ago, OnthePotomac said:

I must respectfully disagree that line counters are inaccurate.  They are not precision for sure, but I have worn out three in the last 15 years and the line they have saved me has more than paid for them.  In addition, they have enabled me to record on the original spool the amount I have used and it always comes out pretty darn close to the spool quantity.  OK, call me a cheap skate, but I do not have to throw away a spool with line, but not quite enough line to use.  It takes a minute to clamp it on the rod in a reverse direction and go.

Not 100 percent sure on the accuracy, but I do watch them like a hawk when letting back crank when trolling to make sure the line doesn't slip. I think the clip on models are a lot more accurate than the line counter reels, which are influenced by the amount of line on the spool, consistent for that reel but not across multiple reels. I do feel they are pretty consistent, but have never thought to verify their accuracy.

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Here's what I do...I make a long cast in the yard and then pull off about 10 more yds, tie new braid onto line with Albright knot and spool till full,no guesswork and your good to go. 

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You can figure how much backing you need easily by knowing a few details and doing some simple math.

 

Spool Capacity rated at what line type and pound test.

 

Line diameter of backing line to be used.

Line diameter and amount of main line you wish to use.

 

If you have this information, the rest is easy.

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