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pondhopperNJ

Bank fishing in the summer heat. Advice anyone?

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Anyone got some personal advice or tips for a fairly new bass-only angler? This will be my first summer where I specifically target bass during the warm dog days at my local ponds bank fishing.

 

I don't have a bass boat so I'm limited to the shoreline and mainly throw Texas rigged craws and Chatterbaits if it's not weed infested. Any advice on how to target those fish when they can't stand the heat? Past two weeks I've been getting results at my nearby ponds but now that the heat is really starting to kick in these fish are nowhere to be seen. I've heard about pitching shaded cover and jigs.

 

but I would like to hear personal advice from actual anglers on how to handle the dog days. Thanks! 

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Stay hydrated

I try to fish areas that have some sort of cover, Sometimes it is just impossible.

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I went out last Sunday evening, it was hot! Didn't catch a thing...

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4 minutes ago, KraskiBass said:

I went out last Sunday evening, it was hot! Didn't catch a thing...

Know this feeling very well. What do you think it is? Water temperature?

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1 hour ago, pondhopperNJ said:

Know this feeling very well. What do you think it is? Water temperature?

Well, my experience could have been that I'm a rookie lol, I've tried different lures and didn't work out none of them. I've tried a crawbug, then a walleye grub, a cricket and nothing...

 

So I think also the heat doesn't help much, fish hide from the sun and the water was hot when I touched it.

 

 

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Try a couple of things. A Texas rigged worm, at least 6" long, also drop shot worm. Work the t rig along the bottom Slowly..If you have any ribbon tailed worms, use a light split shot and swim it a slow as you are able to. Color of the worms usually depend on water clarity, use as light of line as possible. Lastly wacky rigging a senco would be worth a try.. 

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1. Make sure to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water.

2. Fish in the shade and avoid fishing in full sun if possible.

3. Protect your skin since the ultraviolet radiation from the sun is more dangerous than the heat.

4. Try to fish during the morning, late afternoon, or night and not so much during the middle of the day. 

5. Leave early if you feel any signs of heat exhaustion. 

6. Release bass quickly since they will die easier in warmer weather compared to cooler weather.

7. If you are going to keep a legal sized bass ice them immediately so they do not spoil.

8. Hollow belly frogs, spinnerbaits, and trick worms are good lures for Summer bass fishing.

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Start super early or stay late until sunset (I caught a 5lber last night). Look for grass area if you fish in the morning and give them weightless worm(Texas/wacky) or dropshot. Also topwater would be good.

Hat/LS shirt/long pants/gloves/mask, however you like to protect from sun.

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9 minutes ago, JustJames said:

Start super early or stay late until sunset (I caught a 5lber last night). Look for grass area if you fish in the morning and give them weightless worm(Texas/wacky) or dropshot. Also topwater would be good.

Hat/LS shirt/long pants/gloves/mask, however you like to protect from sun.

Wouldn't that make it much more hot to wear extra clothes? Or are they UV resistant?

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5 minutes ago, pondhopperNJ said:

Wouldn't that make it much more hot to wear extra clothes? Or are they UV resistant?

But you don’t get skin cancer, your pick.

I don’t fish in 100 degrees very often but if I do those are a must.

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I’ve had pretty good luck fishing shallow running crankbaits around submerged vegetation after the sun comes up. The water is around 5 or 6 feet deep. 

I soak my neck protector in the lake and then wear it under my wide brim hat. 

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I bank fish in the brutal summer heat of SC so I have some experience here. As others mentioned, you need to stay hydrated and cover up. Believe it or not, wearing a long sleeve shirt with UV protection and moisture wicking capabilities keeps you cooler than just a regular short sleeve t-shirt. I was skeptical at first, but it works.

 

As for the fishing, any bit of cover no matter how shallow has the potential to hold bass. So make sure you fish tight to shore where there's any aquatic vegetation. Make multiple passes at those spots before giving up. I've had a lot of success fishing a buzzbait or Sprinker Frog along lines of vegetation along the shoreline.

 

Bass are also going to be found offshore from the banks as well. They may be close to the bottom in little dips or hollows or they might be suspended below the thermocline. It is my experience that while these bass are not actively seeking food at this time you can tick them off and get them to strike. It is also my experience that during these periods of rest bass are less likely to chase a fast moving bait.

 

One way is to drop a bait right in front of their nose but the odds of doing that from the bank and no electronics is pretty slim. That's why a lot of folks suggest fishing slow along the bottom. It works, but it can be boring.

 

One of my favorite ways to tick off these bass and get them to strike is using a Pop-R. It makes a big noise and you can fish it at different speeds to get their attention and get them to strike.

 

If you can stand the heat, don't pass up fishing between 11 am and 2 pm. I've caught a lot of big fish during that time frame even on blistering hot days. I seem to remember that Toyota has a program in Texas where they collect data on catching bass and the biggest bass were usually caught during that time frame.

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4 hours ago, Koz said:

I bank fish in the brutal summer heat of SC so I have some experience here. As others mentioned, you need to stay hydrated and cover up. Believe it or not, wearing a long sleeve shirt with UV protection and moisture wicking capabilities keeps you cooler than just a regular short sleeve t-shirt. I was skeptical at first, but it works.

 

As for the fishing, any bit of cover no matter how shallow has the potential to hold bass. So make sure you fish tight to shore where there's any aquatic vegetation. Make multiple passes at those spots before giving up. I've had a lot of success fishing a buzzbait or Sprinker Frog along lines of vegetation along the shoreline.

 

Bass are also going to be found offshore from the banks as well. They may be close to the bottom in little dips or hollows or they might be suspended below the thermocline. It is my experience that while these bass are not actively seeking food at this time you can tick them off and get them to strike. It is also my experience that during these periods of rest bass are less likely to chase a fast moving bait.

 

One way is to drop a bait right in front of their nose but the odds of doing that from the bank and no electronics is pretty slim. That's why a lot of folks suggest fishing slow along the bottom. It works, but it can be boring.

 

One of my favorite ways to tick off these bass and get them to strike is using a Pop-R. It makes a big noise and you can fish it at different speeds to get their attention and get them to strike.

 

If you can stand the heat, don't pass up fishing between 11 am and 2 pm. I've caught a lot of big fish during that time frame even on blistering hot days. I seem to remember that Toyota has a program in Texas where they collect data on catching bass and the biggest bass were usually caught during that time frame.

Pop R is a top water right? What about fishing a texas rigged plastic also thanks for the UV shirt advice, any other suggestions like getting a UV face mask? 

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1 hour ago, pondhopperNJ said:

Pop R is a top water right? What about fishing a texas rigged plastic also thanks for the UV shirt advice, any other suggestions like getting a UV face mask? 

Yes, the Pop-R is a topwater. You could also use something like a Whopper Plopper, but instead of reeling it straight in pop or twitch it a few times and let it set, reel down the slack, and do it again. Any topwater that can make some added noise to tick them off will do.

 

For shirts I have the Columbia UPF 50, moisture wicking long sleeve shirts, but there are others out there. I bought the Columbia because they were on sale. I would make sure the shirt is at least UPF 50 and that it is moisture wicking.

 

To protect my face I use Huk gaiters. Again, plenty of other brands out there. While I sometimes wear a baseball cap for protection, recently I bought a Sunday Afternoons Charter hat with UPF protection.

 

Both Texas rigged and wacky rigged Senkos have done OK for me in the heat this year, but by far a Strike King Sexy Shad buzzbait and the Pop-R have been more productive this summer. That being said, if tradition holds when our waters reach their peak heat in August and September soft plastics and Ned Rigs will probably be more productive during the daytime hours. Smaller jigs tend to work better for me then as well.

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12 minutes ago, Koz said:

Yes, the Pop-R is a topwater. You could also use something like a Whopper Plopper, but instead of reeling it straight in pop or twitch it a few times and let it set, reel down the slack, and do it again. Any topwater that can make some added noise to tick them off will do.

 

For shirts I have the Columbia UPF 50, moisture wicking long sleeve shirts, but there are others out there. I bought the Columbia because they were on sale. I would make sure the shirt is at least UPF 50 and that it is moisture wicking.

 

To protect my face I use Huk gaiters. Again, plenty of other brands out there. While I sometimes wear a baseball cap for protection, recently I bought a Sunday Afternoons Charter hat with UPF protection.

 

Both Texas rigged and wacky rigged Senkos have done OK for me in the heat this year, but by far a Strike King Sexy Shad buzzbait and the Pop-R have been more productive this summer. That being said, if tradition holds when our waters reach their peak heat in August and September soft plastics and Ned Rigs will probably be more productive during the daytime hours. Smaller jigs tend to work better for me then as well.

Yeah, a local spot I've been fishing at stopped giving me results once the heat went past 90, gonna have to slow it down a notch probably use some shakey heads or NED rigs, also what is a good size for a whopper plopper? (Beginner topwater guy here) 

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2 hours ago, pondhopperNJ said:

Yeah, a local spot I've been fishing at stopped giving me results once the heat went past 90, gonna have to slow it down a notch probably use some shakey heads or NED rigs, also what is a good size for a whopper plopper? (Beginner topwater guy here) 

I have both the 110 and 130 size Whopper Ploppers, but if you pick up the bigger 130 it's probably best to throw it using a heavy rod. Of all of the sizes I prefer the 110. I don't like the 90 because it doesn't engage quickly on a long cast (even keeping the rod tip up) and it's susceptible to getting fouled by the tiniest of weeds.

 

I do know a lot of people like the 75, which has a different shape than the traditional WP. I have not tried that one yet.

 

I have found the WP to be both extremely hit and miss. In some waters the bass go nuts over it and in others they won't ever touch it.

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IMHO - I believe the heat bothers us more than the fish.   The fish will bite all year long.  We just gotta figure out how to trigger the bite.   But figuring that in the 85 degree+ heat is much hotter.   If we can't figure out a pattern quickly enough, we may write off the trip is too hot to fish. 😕

 

This is especially true for bank fishing.   I'm positive that my last couple outings would've been more productive in a boat.   But like the op I'm bank fishing.   I can see good possible spots, but have no access without a boat/kayak.

 

 

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If it really sucks out, curly tailed magnum worm, or other large slow moving bait, fish it either in the weeds, or if you can get to it some deeper water, best thing though is remember to stay hydrated and not give up, summer fishing isn't for the faint of heart, but nothing is better than baking your butt off and thinking it's never going to happen and then feeling a fish nab that worm/jig/craw...makes the work worth it...mostly lol

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On 7/17/2019 at 11:01 AM, pondhopperNJ said:

Anyone got some personal advice or tips for a fairly new bass-only angler? This will be my first summer where I specifically target bass during the warm dog days at my local ponds bank fishing.

 

I don't have a bass boat so I'm limited to the shoreline and mainly throw Texas rigged craws and Chatterbaits if it's not weed infested. Any advice on how to target those fish when they can't stand the heat? Past two weeks I've been getting results at my nearby ponds but now that the heat is really starting to kick in these fish are nowhere to be seen. I've heard about pitching shaded cover and jigs.

 

but I would like to hear personal advice from actual anglers on how to handle the dog days. Thanks! 

Here in California, 103-108 of dry desert heat, zero humidity. That is like fishing in an oven. 

4am to 8am or so is about the time I fish. Start with a buzzbait, move to an underspin, spinnerbait, lipless and then hit the cattails with a jig or punching gear. Worm is also productive and of course drop shot. 

I would say, invest in a kayak so you can get out on the water. Stay hydrated, cover up and enjoy the fishing. If you are frustrated or not having fun, stop fishing and go home. Fishing should be fun and relaxing even in the summer heat. 

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