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Shad_Master

anti-freeze for my rod

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Ok, here's the scenario - October in Iowa - 28* - 4" of snow on the ground - winds 25-30 mph with stronger gusts - club tournament.

Is there a way to keep ice from forming in the guides?  It got so bad I couldn't cast a 1/2 oz jig and if I got a bite I couldn't reel in.  Even dipping the rod in the water didn't clear it for long enough - and ice was also forming in the level wind eye.

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spray it with reel magic or silicone spray will help

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I fish for steelhead all winter up here.  I used to be a die hard Real Magic fan.  Even then, I had to use Chapstick on the guides to keep them from freezing.  What I tried this past winter was heavily pretreating the line, blank and guides with KVD.  While Ice built up after some time on the line and guides, it beaded before it froze.  A sharp rap to the butt of the rod and the to the reel knocked almost all the ice free.  I kept treating the line and rod this way after every trip, and it worked better than anything else I've used.

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Thanks guys - I wondered about that - but can you expand on the chap stick, please? Never heard of that one.  Also, does it make a difference what line you are using - I seemed to have more trouble with braided line than flouro or hybrid.

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chap stick is a wax and retards water...braid is a string that soaks up water...silicone is a spray that retards water.

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This is something that I always wanted to try but have not gotten the opportunity to test.

I imagine a number of companies make it and it can be found in a typical auto store in a spray. De-Icer.

This is the stuff that is sprayed on the windshield to melt the ice. I imagine that if it works on windshields, it ought to work well on guides.

I am not a chemist however and don't know if there are any ill effects using this spray.

Chris,

I was always under the impression that braid didn't absorb water like mono does.  I think it would fare poorly more a result of its limpness in very cold temps but that is a guess.

We usually don't get cold enough here to have guides freezing and it's only happened to me of one outing and that was the day I thought to use it while freezing my phanny off in 16 degree tempts while wading in a river. It was amazing to watch the water crytalize on the guides and the line passed through them during the retrieve.

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Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

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Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), also known as high-modulus polyethylene (HMPE) or high-performance polyethylene (HPPE), is a subset of the thermoplastic polyethylene. It has extremely long chains, with molecular weight numbering in the millions, usually between 2 and 6 million. The longer chain serves to transfer load more effectively to the polymer backbone by strengthening intermolecular interactions. This results in a very tough material, with the highest impact strength of any thermoplastic presently made.[citation needed] It is highly resistant to corrosive chemicals, with exception of oxidizing acids. It has extremely low moisture absorption, has a very low coefficient of friction, is self-lubricating, and is highly resistant to abrasion (15 times more resistant to abrasion than carbon steel). Its coefficient of friction is significantly lower than that of nylon and acetal, and is comparable to that of Teflon, but UHMWPE has better abrasion resistance than Teflon. It is odorless, tasteless, and nontoxic.

Now think of it like this you take one strand of hair and dip it in water it has little water on the hair.. now braid your hair and dip the braid in water and figure out how much water is retained or how long it takes to dry. You can braid mono and have the same effect it isn't the material that retards the water it is the spaces between the material that traps water also the rough surface. Now if the wet line is limp it sticks to everything if your not careful and becomes a nightmare to fish in freezing conditions. Also consider that braid tends to fray after use small hairs of spectra break which cause it to become kinda fuzzy if you closely inspect it which carry water.

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Yawn....more internet fishing....

That is exactly the problem with mono -- its porous.  KVD coats the line, keeping the water out of the pores.

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Your right what do I know I am just a dumb internet fishermen

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Anyone can look up things on the internet. It takes experience on the water with products and the techniques to gain true knowledge. Its not any rip on you, its just many try to add ballast to their one sided opinion with quotes from other sites. I've used both, and actually had issues with KVD in freezing temps. When I asked Rob Faddis about it, he explained that KVD will coat and seal the pores in the mono, and line previously treated with Real Magic might interfere with that process. I spooled up fresh line, did as he said, and I'll be damned if he wasn't right. Previous to this, I would have recommended Real Magic, and have for many years. KVD is that much better. As far as braid goes, its totally inappropriate for sub freezing temps.

If you are wondering what type of conditions I'm fishing in, take a look at this:

Air temps were in the mid 20s this day

478621797_D6x6R-M.jpg

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OK have you read any of KVD's early books on fishing? Well if not let me highlight some things. In his book he said that the best line treatment to use is 100% silicone spray bought at the hardware store. At the time the only spray on the market was reel magic and he felt that the silicone spray worked better. When you first put line on your reel it has a powder that comes off the line which is silicone and helps preserve the line and retards water. When the powder washes off water fills the pores of the line. Very few paid much attention to the statements in this book and he saw an opportunity to profit from this and created KVD line treatment.

It takes experience on the water with products and the techniques to gain true knowledge. I would suggest you take a tour of my posts on this site just an idea. I don't claim to know everything but do know a little.

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So you agree.  KVD Line and Lure is better in icy conditions.

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The answer to the question is that silicone will retard water and ice. The more silicone in the product the better it works. No i don't know what is in the other products. If I was to make a educated guess I would say that silicone was part of the KVD product. Yes i changed my post.

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So are you outing silicone as the secret ingredient in KVD L&L?  Have you used it?  How do you know its silicone?

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This is something that I always wanted to try but have not gotten the opportunity to test.

I imagine a number of companies make it and it can be found in a typical auto store in a spray. De-Icer.

This is the stuff that is sprayed on the windshield to melt the ice. I imagine that if it works on windshields, it ought to work well on guides.

I am not a chemist however and don't know if there are any ill effects using this spray.

Chris,

I was always under the impression that braid didn't absorb water like mono does. I think it would fare poorly more a result of its limpness in very cold temps but that is a guess.

We usually don't get cold enough here to have guides freezing and it's only happened to me of one outing and that was the day I thought to use it while freezing my phanny off in 16 degree tempts while wading in a river. It was amazing to watch the water crytalize on the guides and the line passed through them during the retrieve.

The main ingredient in both Heet fuel treatment, and Heet windshield deicer is methyll alcohol. So regular old jack daniels, or denatured alcohol would have the same effect, unless there is something in mix that causes it to stick to the surface better. In either case, evaporation would probably be a big problem, at least as a deterrent. Im sure it would work fine to de-ice your rig, but probably not to prevent it.

Anyone with experience with silicone lubricants would recognize silicone as a big part of KVD after using it.

Maybe I am an internet fisherman, cause I dont have any steelhead pictures to prove my worth on a bass fishing forum, lol.

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FourBizz,

I appreciate your input. That helps. I have fished conditions exactly as shown in JF's pic. Frosted guides will definitely hinder casting to the point you can't cast and out in the field I got around it by dipping the guides in the moving water and shaking off the excess water before it would freeze on the guides.

I think the bottle of jack will be better. At least it could give me that warm feeling in the cold. ;D

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For fishing in freezing temps, I prefer cognac.

Doesn't do much for the guides, or line, but who cares? ;D ;D

I don't know what's in KVD, and don't really care. I do know that it works well, if you follow the directions. Applying it to the line, and to the guides and rod does help in freezing conditions. It does not prevent ice from forming. It does make it much easier to rid the line and guides of ice once it does form.

As far as I know, the only thing that will prevent ice from forming on the guides and line is an air temperature above 273 degrees K. :D

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The only time I had ice in one of my guides is when I spilled my sweet tea on the rod, a cube got caught in the 1st. guide ;D

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All this talk of iced up rod guides and level winds on reels is depressing me. I've been there and done that, but as I get older I'm less inclined to fish in freezing conditions. The local power plant lake usually tempts into a trip or two into a trip or two before winter is done though. ::D

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I don't know a darn thing...except that in many years of ice fishing I've had no ice problems, never heard of it till I read this thread.

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Hey look who's back!  Chris!  Good to see you buddy. Welcome back!

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All this talk of iced up rod guides and level winds on reels is depressing me. I've been there and done that, but as I get older I'm less inclined to fish in freezing conditions. The local power plant lake usually tempts into a trip or two into a trip or two before winter is done though. ::D

Would that be Egypt??

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