Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BASSclary

Im going to build one...

Recommended Posts

Well folks, i've got my heart dead-set on building my own rod. So this Christmas I'm going to use all the money I get for buying components and building equipment. I am planning on building a dedicated Cranking Stick.

So my questions are;

What are some good, but relatively cheap tools? The only thing I really have to get are a dryer/spinner and a thread wrapper?

What guides and inserts would you go with?

For cranks between the 0-12 foot range, would you go with a mod. or a mod/fast?

What are some quality threads to wrap the guides? Do I need color preserver?

Good Epoxy?

Ive tried looking this up, but I feel i'll understand on here more.

The only thing I know I DEFINATELY want is a Fuji reel seat.

And I almost forgot, it will be a casting rod.

I've also been leaning towards a St.Croix blank. What is the difference between all the Legend (extreme, elite, and tournament) series rods? What one is best? Also if there are better blanks for the price, feel free to suggest them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were you I'd get a customized plastics or jig rod before a crank rod.

High priced rods are more sensitive, hence the higher price. Sensitivity usually isn't the first thing that comes to mind (or perhaps just my mind perhaps) when fishing a crankbait. Fiberglass rods are not very sensitive, yet many use them for cranking.

Just my 2 cents.

Also, I would check out TackleUnderground. I think they got some people there as well who have the know-how regarding rod building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom Kirkman's book should #1 on your list... Idealy you will go spend the $15 on it now then make your shopping list. http://www.mudhole.com/Shop-Our-Catalog/Rod-Building-Books/Rod-Building-Guide-Fly-Cast-Spin

While you are there request Mudhole's catalog as well...

You don't need a electric wrapper/dryer if you aren't building a bunch of rods. You can build your own wrapper out of 1x4's and some felt, just hang out near the rod after you've applied the epoxy and just give it 1/4 turns every 15 minutes for an hour. Kirkman's book has an ingenious set up for beginners that works very well.

Also don't spend a bunch of money for your first rod build (save the St. Croix's until you are 100% confident, a crappy build on a nice blank is a waste). Get a closeout e or s glass blank from Mudhole that matches the weights/line you'll be throwing (Gator blanks). Then some basic Halide guides, a reel seat that fits your hand/grip and some EVA grip, thread size, go with A. Be stealth and go black with everything (easier to cover the inevitable f-ups).

If it were ME before I bought all the stuff I'd need for a new rod, I'd try and scrounge up a beat old rod and strip it down and rebuild it. It'll save money and helps move you up the learning curve a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I were you I'd get a customized plastics or jig rod before a crank rod.

High priced rods are more sensitive, hence the higher price. Sensitivity usually isn't the first thing that comes to mind (or perhaps just my mind perhaps) when fishing a crankbait. Fiberglass rods are not very sensitive, yet many use them for cranking.

Just my 2 cents.

Also, I would check out TackleUnderground. I think they got some people there as well who have the know-how regarding rod building.

Thats why i'm going to try and build a cranking rod. It'll be the first rod i've ever built and I doubt it will come out perfect. I won't mind so much if a cranking rod doesn't come out perfect if that makes sense. My second rod will definately be a worm/jig rod though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kirkman's book should #1 on your list... Idealy you will go spend the $15 on it now then make your shopping list.

You don't need a electric wrapper/dryer if you aren't building a bunch of rods. You can build your own wrapper out of 1x4's and some felt, just hang out near the rod after you've applied the epoxy and just give it 1/4 turns every 15 minutes for an hour. Kirkman's book has an ingenious set up for beginners that works very well.

Also don't spend a bunch of money for your first rod build. Get a closeout e or s glass blank from Mudhole that matches the weights/line you'll be throwing (Gator blanks). Then some basic Halide guides, a reel seat that fits your hand/grip and some EVA grip, thread size, go with A. Be stealth and go black with everything (easier to cover the inevitable f-ups).

If it were ME before I bought all the stuff I'd need for a new rod, I'd try and scrounge up a beat old rod and strip it down and rebuild it. It'll save money and helps move you up the learning curve a bit.

Ya, i think I wont go with the SC blank now because its my first build.

Also, does anybody get the sizing on reel seats? I dont know what the sizing is  :-X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the blank you are getting.  Call mudhole when you order and the guys will steer you towards all the appropriate sizes (arbors and reel seat) you'll need for the blank you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keep us informed on your progress and good luck.

I may film it  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your first blank I recommend looking at the MHX series by Mudhole.  This is an excellent blank for the price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMPO as a custom rod builder, I would recommend that anyone looking to get into rod building, purchase and read cover to cover the book written by Tom Kirkman suggested above before ordering any components.

It is the one book written for beginners in this art, and will answer most if not all of the questions any newbie in rod building will ask.

Good Luck & Tight Wraps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely read one of the books by Kirkman, Clemens or Flex Coat before buying anything. Keep it simple at first. A makeshift wrapping jig consisting of a notched box and a heavy book for thread tension is all you need. Turning by hand will give you insight as to how epoxy behaves. Many experienced builders will argue that you get a better finish that way anyhow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need a wrapping machine for just one rod.  Use your fingers to spin the rod while you wrap with the other hand.  Or, buy a used sewing machine motor and build your own turner.  I built my own and wrapped dozens of rods with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay thanks guys, I knew I could wrap by hand, (Which I was planning on doing anyways to limit mistakes) but I didn't know you could just turn it every 15 min or so.

Glad to know I only have to make the tho V shaped  2x4's with some felt lining it.

And I looked at Kirkman's book on Borders.com , I'll definately check it out next time im at borders!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update:

I just threw together a wrapping block with some wood and stuff laying around the house, and of course some help from the internet ;)

I just need some felt for the V in the 2x4's, and some thread to show you my concept!

Also, Can I use a different material besides felt for the inside of the V that holds the blank??? Like, say a couple strips of soft fabric??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything that will prevent the blank from getting nicked or scratched should be ok.  Think about durability.  Once you have whatever it is you choose attached to the notches you don't want to have to redo or fix it frequently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used the "v" cut out as well when I first started too. Suggestion though- don't make a "v" cut. Make the cut more rounded at the bottom so the rod turns easier. Make the cut more "u" shaped.

Size "A" thread might be too thin for your first time. I would practice with thicker thread until you get used to wrapping. If you're going to do a blacked out rod then the heavier thread won't be noticeable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To start I think I will re-wrap the guides on my saltwater ugly stick. Come to think of it I dont know if ugly-stick are evn wrapped?

I just used a rat-tail file to make the slot for U shaped than V, and glued some cloth on.

Will regular sewing thread work? I dont really want to buy some "rod-building" thread off the internet just yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will regular sewing thread work? I dont really want to buy some "rod-building" thread off the internet just yet.

No - don't go there. I often use rod wrapping thread for tying jigs and Bass Bugs, but I wouldn't use flytying thread for rod wrapping - when you see one versus the other you can see why the rod wrapping thread is more expensive - it's just much, much better. Sewing thread wouldn't even rank.

I second (or third?) everything everyone else has said - and also check out rodbuilding.com while you're at it. Lot's of help there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sewing thread is fine, but most kinds have a silicone lubricant added to help the thread run through sewing machines.  You can use it, but you will need to use color preserver or the silicone will cause problems with the epoxy finish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never mind the sewing thread. The ones my mom has are too weak.

Anyways I got some felt on it today and made an interesting Thread tension mechanism (I'll throw it on youtube soon).

I used the sewing thread to practice wrapping on a broom stick, and I think I did pretty well for only one color.

I'll try and put my rig on youtube tonight or tommorow afternoon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over-view of my wrapping rig.

Watch in 1080p and enjoy! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're on the right track. Rod building thread has more stretch to it than sewing thread allowing for tighter, stronger wraps. Don't go too tight or the guide foot can dig into the blank causing damage and failure. You should be able to move the guide under the wrap without too much problem. On your wrapper, put a strip of Velcro across one of the V notches to hold the rod from spinning backwards. This helps keep your wraps tight and not overlapping. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You're on the right track. Rod building thread has more stretch to it than sewing thread allowing for tighter, stronger wraps. Don't go too tight or the guide foot can dig into the blank causing damage and failure. You should be able to move the guide under the wrap without too much problem. On your wrapper, put a strip of Velcro across one of the V notches to hold the rod from spinning backwards. This helps keep your wraps tight and not overlapping.

That confused me a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, it's a little hard to describe. Take a look at this picture to see what I mean. http://www.mudhole.com/Shop-Our-Catalog/Wrappers/Flexcoat-EW1-Traveller-Rod-Wrapper

It's just something to put a touch of pressure on the blank so it isn't free spinning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So does the blank just sit on top of the velcro, or do you wrap the rod down with the velcro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×