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Guest avid

favorite jigging spoon

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Guest avid

I may be having an opportunity to fish some deep water lakes for LMB this winter.  I know nothing about jigging spoons in freshwater.  The water is lightly stained.  Water temps should be in the mid  50's.

What are some of the "standard" spoons and techniques for jigging up bass in the deeper water, say >20'?

Thanks,

avid

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Hey, Avid. I like Hopkins Shorty. 31_106.jpghttp://www.basspro.com/servlet/catalog.TextId?hvarTextId=15452&hvarTarget=search&cmCat=SearchResults

As far as techniques. You need an abrupt lift but you can vary the distance.  You also can make several (lift flutter- lift flutter- lift flutter) as a series of upward movements but not letting the jig fall all the way back down between each to make it look like a baitfish struggling to swim. You have to make sure to give the jig the freedom on the drop so that it will flutter but so much that you lose total contact. I have the best luck with either silver or one painted white but that just may be a local thing. I'm just a beginner with this in freshwater but at least I hope this helped some.

post-10877-130162869664_thumb.jpg

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Guest avid

yes, very helpful.  that is exactly the lure I expected to be mentioned and exactly the way I expected to fish it.  Nice to know the generally accepted lure and presentation as a starting point.

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I'm with Paparock.

I was first introduced to the Hopkins Shorty in the ocean, where they were popular

because of their fast sink rate in tidal waters. The "Hopkins Shorty" and the "Diamond Jig" (ava)

were the top two metals, called "squiding" spoons back then.

We later used them in New Jersey and Georgia when largemouth bass were schooling in fall.

They get down into the shad schools real fast. Here in Florida though most of the lakes are shallow

and I really don't get to use the Hopkins anymore.

Roger

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No doubt the Hopkins spoons are good baits but i use jigging spoons quite a bit in the winter and from my experience they are not worth what you pay for them . I use the Cordell jigging spoons (almost  the same as a Hopkins but close). I usually will lose 2 or 3 per trip and the Hopkins spoons are not as economical. Also change out the treble hooks to a #2 premium hook.

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I'm not a great spoon fisherman but hopkins/bps brand are the ones I use.

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Guest avid

the bps looks very much like the hopkins

the cc cordell looks a little lighter.

anyone notice difference in the action?

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The brand of spoon matters the least as long as you have the right weight. What more important is finding the right group of fish that is feeding. When you find the right fish they will hit any brand so I use the CC spoon most of the time you can get two or three for the price of one. Think of it as fishing for fish schooling on top but it is happening under the water. They could care less what brand you have in most cases since you are fishing for feeding fish.  Most important thing is finding active fish feeding on bait and being able to determine which fish to fish for and which ones to leave alone by looking at your depth finder. I do more riding around looking for the right fish when spooning than actual fishing.

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man i hate being a noob cause i start discovering all these tempting lures to use.  this spoon sounds fun too.  i have seen them in action and think hey are fun lol.  in terms of rod setup, what should you use?  i am guessing since there is a treble hook, you want a little flexibility in your rod and line?  just wondering, again im a newb but thanks for your help.

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Guest avid

I'll defer to the experts here, but my plan was to use a medium action rod.

The tip is soft enough to put some bounce into the spoon when raising it, yet the rod still has enough backbone to control a decent sized bass.

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in terms of rod setup, what should you use? i am guessing since there is a treble hook, you want a little flexibility in your rod and line? just wondering, again im a newb but thanks for your help.

I'm no rod expert, but if your favorite crankbait rod has a fast tip (quick taper), I'd say you're good-to-go.

With jigging spoons, most of the hits will occur on the drop, so high-modulus graphite would be a big asset.

Roger

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I'm with Rolo on the rod as that is what I use. The hit is 90% on the drop and that is why it is so critical to give the jig enough freedom so it can do it's flutter thing but then you need all the feel you can get. I am still trying to get the technique down but when the fish here go deep in this crystal clear water, jigs and vibration metal baits like silver buddies are the best way to get to where they are. When the cold starts killing the shad and they start falling towards the bottom is a hot time the locals tell me are red hot for the metals.

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I do a lot of jigging with spoons in early spring, summer and fall. I like the Acme Kastmaster (1/4 oz and 1/2 oz) over the Hopkins type in clear water to off-colored water, and I prefer to go with a Silver Buddy blade bait in darker waters, and whenever I go below 30 feet. To me it appears the Kastmaster has a better action on the fall over the Hopkins.  And I only use silver (when its sunny) and gold (when its cloudy) colors.  I also like to go one hook size larger than the size jigging spoons comes with and also switch to red hooks. In addition I tie a few strands of mylar to the treble hook. I use a 5'9" medium action fast tip baitcasting rod, and now prefer to go with 10lb flourocarbon.

 

One trick I've used with some success is (when all else fails) I put a tube bait over the Hopkins style jigging spoon.  But the type of plastic is important as some baits stretch way too much after a little jigging action.  You can also squirt some scent into this setup.

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Guest avid

I love kastmasters, but have always used them as a casting spoon.  Never even thought to try as a jigging spoon.  Like I said I have zero experience with deep water jigging spoons for bass.   I appreciate all the comments so far and any more that may come in

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Well it looks like everyone did a good job covering this.  I just want to chime in with what works for me.  I have had luck with Crippled Herrings, CC spoons, Hopkins, Kastmasters, Revenge, Megabait and Haddock spoons but the one bait that really shines for me is the new jigging spoon by War Eagle.  Another thing to try that I didn't see anyone mention is the Rapala Ice Jig.  My most productive color for any spoon I use is gold regardless of conditions.  I think that when you drop a gold spoon down below a ball of bait, it stands out from the rest of the bait.

Most importantly when you are spooning is to get yourself a needle and learn how to use it if you don't know already.  

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Guest avid

Don't they use the jigging spoon alot in those deep western waters?

C'mon basswesters, lets hear from y'all

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