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BASSclary

A thought/theory...

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... that I came up with in school. (No I was not high. lol)

What if everyone saw colors different? Like male's saw the opposite color spectrum then women,or for everyone it was random. Like when I see blue, others see the opposite on the color spectrum (I don't know the opposite). It could explain why everyone likes and has different favorite colors. Maybe everyone likes a standard color, but we all see it different. So like if everything saw the, we'll call it Mystery-color, and one person saw it to be red, and the other saw it to be purple, and those were there favorite colors, it would be the same mystery-color, but they see it as a different color than its true Mystery-color. This makes no-sense, but then again, I cant think of anyway to disprove the theory. Because everyone see's the color different if the theory is correct. Suppose you place a blue-piece of paper on a table and ask everyone to tell you what color it is. They will all answer blue, because ever since they were born they've learned it as blue, even though they may see it as red. So red may be blue to them.

But I dont think this can proven/disproven... I guess we'll never know man...

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You may not have smoked one but you may want to stay away from the brownies....... :o

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Are you aware that there are some people that are color blind?

I used to work with a guy that couldn't see blue, red, green and some tints of yellow. He wasn't much use as a helper when working on electrical stuff. Riding with him and approaching a stop light was unsettling too if no other vehicles were around.

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Are you aware that there are some people that are color blind?

I used to work with a guy that couldn't see blue, red, green and some tints of yellow. He wasn't much use as a helper when working on electrical stuff. Riding with him and approaching a stop light was unsettling too if no other vehicles were around.

Yes. Obviously my thoughts wouldn't pertain to them.

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I'm color blind blue.  I can see blue, though.  I just can't tell some shades apart.  As far as the traffic signal goes, you are aware that they are all the same, red on top, yellow in the middle, and green at the bottom.

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I bet you have no clue what was discussed in class today.

I don't care what's discussed in schools on snow days  ;D ;):D;)

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Now THAT was funny.   ;D ;D ;D

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I'm color blind blue. I can see blue, though. I just can't tell some shades apart. As far as the traffic signal goes, you are aware that they are all the same, red on top, yellow in the middle, and green at the bottom.

I'm red/green color blind. Got a ticket in Peoria once when I ran a red light. There was some construction going on, and the traffic light was hung up sideways over the intersection.

They're not always red on the top. :D :D :D

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I would be lying if I said that I have never had this exact same idea pop into my head.

Such as, we both see something that is green, and we both agree that it is the color green, but we may see it differently.

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A man looks in the closet and sees 12 pairs of white shoes. His wife swears they're 12 different shades of white. Go figure :-?

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Color is derived from the spectrum of white light.  Each color (red orange yellow green blue indigo violet) has a specific wavelength associated with it, which gives each color it's distinctive appearance.

The part of the eye that detects these wavelengths are cone cells.  Other parts of the eye pass this information to the brain, where it is translated as the "color" that you see.

For instance, the color red has a wavelength of around 700 nm.  Every human eye (barring mutations, etc) will interpret this wavelength in the same way.

Sorry.

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Color is derived from the spectrum of white light. Each color (red orange yellow green blue indigo violet) has a specific wavelength associated with it, which gives each color it's distinctive appearance.

The part of the eye that detects these wavelengths are cone cells. Other parts of the eye pass this information to the brain, where it is translated as the "color" that you see.

For instance, the color red has a wavelength of around 700 nm. Every human eye (barring mutations, etc) will interpret this wavelength in the same way.

Sorry.

Why cant the human body interpret the wavelength into a different color.

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Genetics.

But everyone has different genes

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My grandpa was color blind, i don't really know what he could and could not see, but playing uno with was intresting  ;D.

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One way to disprove the theory is to look at something and ask someone else what color it is.  If they say red and so do you, then it is disproved, at least for that guy.  Heh.

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Everyone has the same genes, but different versions of those genes.  There is not a conceivable selection pressure against the way one would interpret a particular color. 

But genes can affect eyesight.  This happens when a gene does not translate for the correct protein that enables us to see certain colors.  And, humoring the theory that includes the genes you are referring to did exist, we would probably know about them, considering the human genome has been sequences (MOST of it, anyway).

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I'm color blind blue. I can see blue, though. I just can't tell some shades apart. As far as the traffic signal goes, you are aware that they are all the same, red on top, yellow in the middle, and green at the bottom.

Many years ago when I was living in Huntsville, AL, there were several intersections with the lights mounted sideways. Red was on the left, and green on the right.

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One way to disprove the theory is to look at something and ask someone else what color it is. If they say red and so do you, then it is disproved, at least for that guy. Heh.

But to them, that color is red, it has been there whole lives. Its just blue to you.

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Everyone has the same genes, but different versions of those genes. There is not a conceivable selection pressure against the way one would interpret a particular color.

But genes can affect eyesight. This happens when a gene does not translate for the correct protein that enables us to see certain colors. And, humoring the theory that includes the genes you are referring to did exist, we would probably know about them, considering the human genome has been sequences (MOST of it, anyway).

Why can't the different variations of the "same" genes humor my theory?

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You may not have smoked one but you may want to stay away from the brownies....... :o

Would have to agree here. Your thery dosent work for the same reason that grass is green(no pun intended) and the sky is blue.

Clancy W

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Color is derived from the spectrum of white light. Each color (red orange yellow green blue indigo violet) has a specific wavelength associated with it, which gives each color it's distinctive appearance.

The part of the eye that detects these wavelengths are cone cells. Other parts of the eye pass this information to the brain, where it is translated as the "color" that you see.

For instance, the color red has a wavelength of around 700 nm. Every human eye (barring mutations, etc) will interpret this wavelength in the same way.

Sorry.

Why cant the human body interpret the wavelength into a different color.

I think it can.  It's only red because you were told/taught it was red.  If you tell/teach an infant that  what you and I see as red is blue, then the infant will relate red as being blue.

Your eyes see red because your brain was taught that what your eyes see is red.  You could have taught your brain to see red as blue.  Then you'd think all redheads had blue hair.   

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Color is derived from the spectrum of white light. Each color (red orange yellow green blue indigo violet) has a specific wavelength associated with it, which gives each color it's distinctive appearance.

The part of the eye that detects these wavelengths are cone cells. Other parts of the eye pass this information to the brain, where it is translated as the "color" that you see.

For instance, the color red has a wavelength of around 700 nm. Every human eye (barring mutations, etc) will interpret this wavelength in the same way.

Sorry.

Why cant the human body interpret the wavelength into a different color.

I think it can. It's only red because you were told/taught it was red. If you tell/teach an infant that what you and I see as red is blue, then the infant will relate red as being blue.

Your eyes see red because your brain was taught that what your eyes see is red. You could have taught your brain to see red as blue. Then you'd think all redheads had blue hair.

but the ACTUAL color you're seeing (wavelength) is still red, regardless of what you choose to name it.

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