Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest JoshKeller

What do you guys think about this idea?

Recommended Posts

Guest JoshKeller

I'm very seriously considering starting up a guide service on Choke Canyon, Coleto Creek, and Lake Mathis.  I have no bills, and my parents are going ot back me financially, so I will be able to offer some very competitive rates to get my name out there. My boat and truck is paid for, so the only thing I will be paying is gas, insurance, and tackle, which is basically how it is now. Since It cost me about $40 a day in gas, I'm thinking that I could charge $150 a day, provide lunch, and still make a nice profit. Would there be any interest in this, or is this just something that is too risky?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, sounds like no risk to you at all, you have everything already paid for. Are you considering this as a new career or just a side job? Guess for me that would be the determining factor.

Don't know about your state but make sure you check into what licenses and certifcations you will have to have. Also, insurance is a must and from speaking to some friends whom are guides, it can be fairly costly.

Good luck if you give it a go!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JoshKeller

i currently have 100k liability, and I can bump it up to 500k for $250 more a year. I beleive the guiding license in texas is about $125 a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to thoroughly check out the rules and regs of TX for guides. I know in Missouri you must have passed a Coast Guard boat operators course,  be certified by the Red Cross in CPR and life saving techniques as well as have a specific minimum amount of liability insurance.  BTW, make sure you notify your insurance company of your plans to guide, there are often clauses in most boat owners insurance policies that don't cover you if you're using your boat for commercial purposes.   You'll also need to have enough equipment (ie spinning or spincasting equipment) for inexperienced clients and quality equipment for more expereinced anglers. This includes lures.  You'll need extra lifejackets of various sizes.  Is your boat ready and is it big enough for a couple extra anglers? How old is the boat?   Your reputation will tank quickly if your boat is too small, not in top shape,  uncomfortable or has equipment malfunctions.  

Just a few things to think and plan for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get legit and I'll hit you up for a trip on Canyon.  I'm about to get transfered to Ft. Sam Houston if everything works out for me.  $150 is a dern good price for a place like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JoshKeller
Get legit and I'll hit you up for a trip on Canyon.  I'm about to get transfered to Ft. Sam Houston if everything works out for me.  $150 is a dern good price for a place like that.

or just come down for a few days and i'll take you out for half the cost of gas.  :)

my dad and i were discussing it, and he thinks there is much more money to be made into leasing out our ranch per week.  He wants me to enter a few major tournaments next year and see how I do there, before going into guiding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think you are charging enough. There is $150-$40 so then $110 -$10 for food which leaves you with $100. Then you have to consider if clients will be using your equipment or there own, you can then take out more money for the cost of fishing gear. I believe your idea can get some money, but there will be alot of little things that can add up fast, so be sure of a price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know much about guiding but I did learn from 16 years in business that a good reputation earned by honesty, doing a good job, and treating people right will get you a lot more business than a cheap price.  It is important to know what your operating costs are before you set your price.  Don't forget wear and tear on your boat which will have to be replaced far sooner if you use it every day to guide.  Your clients are also going to break rod tips and lose a lot of lures.  It sounds like a great way to earn a living if you like people.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think you are charging enough. There is $150-$40 so then $110 -$10 for food which leaves you with $100. Then you have to consider if clients will be using your equipment or there own, you can then take out more money for the cost of fishing gear. I believe your idea can get some money, but there will be alot of little things that can add up fast, so be sure of a price.

I agree with Will. After gas, lunch and other expendibles, this gives you 2k per month and 24k per year. Probably not the income you're looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be successful: How's your fishing skills? Don't take this wrong, but if your fishing skills are like your business sense you don't have much of a chance of success. Guiding is a lot more than just having a boat and a truck to get it to a lake. It also costs far more than $40.00 per day to go out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have nothing to lose if your finances are in order so FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS and $150/day will get you clients so if you provide a fun, quality trip with fish in the boat it will not be long until you can charge about whatever you wish. People will gladly pay for a quality experience!

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just saw you've got a 1978 85hp outboard motor.  While that may work perfectly for you right now if I was a paying customer I might raise an eyebrow if I showed up at the dock and my guide for the day was going to be taking me around in old equipment.  I'm not knocking you boat mind you but most guides at least mention the kind and age of the boat and motor you'll be fishing out of in order to provide a peace of mind for customers.  I know if I was forking out $150-200 a day for a guide I sure wouldn't want to be wondering if the day was going to be ruined due to equipment problems because of the age of the boat and motor.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JoshKeller
I just saw you posted in the Bassboat forum that you've got a 1978 85hp outboard motor.  While that may work perfectly for you right now if I was a paying customer I might raise an eyebrow if I showed up at the dock and my guide for the day was going to be taking me around in old equipment.  I'm not knocking you boat mind you but most guides at least mention the kind and age of the boat and motor you'll be fishing out of in order to provide a peace of mind for customers.  I know if I was forking out $150-200 a day for a guide I sure wouldn't want to be wondering if the day was going to be ruined due to equipment problems because of the age of the boat and motor.

Actually, as part of the deal, I would be upgrading to a 19 or 20 foot boat, with at least a 200 hp motor. Like I said, I would have the full financial backing of my parents, as my dad has often dreamt of having a career in the outdoors, and will help me out wherever needed for me to be able to do so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Help from your parents is not going to be whenever you need it, but rather always, because based on your proposal you will always need help.

I think if I was in my early 20's I would want to be off supporting myself, not living on Mom and Dad.

Based on your proposal, if I was a person looking for a guide, I would have to assume that you have no clue of what you are doing because the rest of the guides in the Canyon are charging 300-350 per day. At 150 per day, you either don't know what you are doing, or you are whoring the business. Either situation would be enough for me to find someone else.

You just might want to rethink this whole deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By fishing a few big tournys. wont tell you much. you have to be abel to catch a bunch of fish as a guide. Most of the guides only fish during the week when there is less pressure on the water. I know a guide that has a real good reputation and stays booked. His tournament record is not good at all. Don't think just because you may bomb in a tournament that you will not be a succesful guide. GOOD LUCK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Josh,  

Follow your dreams.    One of our own used to live in Chicago at one time.   He made that trip a few times from Ill. to Tx and fell in love with Lake Fork.    He is a licensed full time guide on Fork.    I'd PM Tom Reddington and ask for advice.  He made the move when he was in college.    He has certainly built his reputation on his skills, and is considered to be amoung the best around the lake.

Good Luck

Matt

I

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go for it!  The very first guides had no one to bounce their ideas off of.  They just took a chance and did it.  Take the advice here but screw anyone who tells you that you can't do it for whatever reason.  So what if you fall flat on your face..... that is living, man!  Dare to Dream!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, maybe you didn't like George's response, but he is the ONLY professional guide that has responded. If I were you, I would heed his advice and try to get a MUCH BETTER handle on what is required to be a successful guide. That includes fishing expertise and perhaps more importantlly, the financial prerequisites needed.

I certainly don't think you should just "Go For It", that's a receipe for failure. Do your homework and find out what you are really getting into, what it takes to be successful and how much momey you can realistically expect to make the first year, the second, third and so on.

Another possibility is working with some of the experienced guides for awhile. If you can find someone to take you under their wing so to speak, maybe you can work for them and learn the ropes. Have you ever fished with a guide? That might be a place to start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Josh-The guys aren't being mean, just brutally honest which is exactly what you need to hear.  

I don't think they doubt your passion but especiallty people like GW, I bet he's seen more of "your type" (not derogatory) fail than succeed.  Set up right, heed the time proven advice being offered.

Good luck in your venture!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guiding in Texas: step #1

What are the requirements for a saltwater fishing guide? Freshwater?

Current state and federal laws require those persons that take people out fishing for hire, must have a U.S. Coast Guard Captains License: Charterboat Captain /OUPV/ Six Pack License. It is the operators responsibility to assure compliance with USCG regulations. For more information, contact the Houston Regional Exam Center at (713) 948-3350 or 948-3351.

On top of that you would need a TPWD issued Fishing Guides License, costs $200 for the saltwater version ($125 for freshwater version-the saltwater version allows you to fish both). To get the TPWD saltwater license you have to show a valid USCG Captains License. Other than that and a boat and a couple rods and reels, you're free to offer trips anywhere in Texas marine or fresh waters.

I might suggest contacting the Coastal Bend Guides Association for more information. http://www.cbga.org

A Freshwater fishing guide license "is required for any person who for compensation accompanies, assists, or transports any person engaged in fishing in the waters of the state." The license costs $125 for guides operating in fresh water only. For guides operating in both fresh and salt water, the fee is $200 for Texas residents and $1,000 for non-residents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Step #2:

In most states boat insurance is a matter of choice, not requirement. However, when you venture forth for compensation you would be well advised to have the proper insurance. Commercial Insurance typically runs 1000-1200 per year for a 20 foot boat with a 200 HP pusher. This is for lake or inshore coverage and carries a 1,000,000. umbrella. Regular boat insurance becomes null and void for any commercial usage of the boat.

Step #3:

Know your body of water like the back of your eye lids. This is not just a requirement for catching fish but for safety also. There is nothing like getting caught in a bad storm and wondering which way is the safe way to the ramp.

Geesh - I could write a book about this: oh, I think I might have already done that.

Josh,

As others have said, I'm not being mean, just being real. There is so much more to this business than having a boat, equipment, and knowledge of your lakes.

You have to have an undying love for bass fishing as you are going out there no matter the weather or family occassions that you are going to miss. It's a day after day event that for most becomes a grind in a hurry. The rewards are many, but they don't come cheaply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Choke Canyon ??? That's the place with the huge Gator Gars, is it not ? I'd pay you to put me on some of those !

Don't know why anybody would fish for wimpy little bass, when they had those radical prehistoric monsters to tangle with !  ;-)  

Okay... Okay... we have Sturgeon which can go 300 plus lbs, and although I do love to fish for them too, I still probably spend more time each year, chasing these "little ol' Bass" :-) Hard to say why I still love the green ones, with the big mouths, so much....

Peace,

Fish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Josh,

I am a college instructor, and I one of the courses that I teach is Entrepreneurship. I recommend that you do a business plan. Be sure to be realistic with your numbers when you do the financial portion of the plan. The plan takes some research and time, but it will allow you to make very informed decisions about your guide business. It will help you layout your finances, set prices, obtain permits & insurance, & also help you make the decision as to whether or not guiding is a realistic career for you. After doing the business plan you may decide that the cost and effort may out way the return or maybe not. However, those are the types of decision that the business plan will allow you to make. Here is a website that should help.

http://www.sba.gov

If you have any questions send me a PM, and I will answer them to the best of my ability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are 2 businesses that always sound really attractive to get into but almost always wind up being completely different than expectations for those that try it. One is a fishing guide and the other is a fishing resort owner.  I've known guys who have done both. Some got out and others stayed in but they all said the same thing, the job became something completely different than what they envisioned originally.  

Something to think about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...