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bow3022

Hot weather, fishing stratagies???

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Now, im in new jersey and out where im at lately its been hot like hell. What i've been seeing for the past 3 weeks, i haven't caught  alot of bass lately. Now, i'm fishing all sorts of stuff, deep crankbait, senkos and frogs for deep water. And for topwater i'm using buzz baits and jitterbug. Couple days ago i got some pretty good hits at night, where theres no sun and its pitch black. Now, heres the question, how should i be fishing? I can't go late into the night, i can only go till 10, maybe 10:30 at max. Should i just be fishig deeper water in the day time?(6pm-8pm)

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During the hot days bass will go deeper during the day, especially smallmouth. If you fish when the sun is hot then i'd fish deeper water during the day for sure. From my experience the clearer the water your fishing on the hot days the bass will be deeper, if its really merky water look for suspended bass.

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The water isn't to murkey. About 4-5 feet down i can see down to the bottom. Also, a question bout baby bass. If they are here now, how long will it take for them to grow bigger? Like atleast 1lb and up? I don't think i've ever caught a smallmouth ever.

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For hot days, i like to throw c-rigs around deeper brush piles.  towards the evenings i like to slow roll spinners over weed lines.  tawards dark, topwater around structure or grass lines you might have along the edges of your lake.  fish grow faster/slower depending on your location and the room they have to grow.  I wouldn't know how fast they grow in your area, well, i don't even know how fast they grow here  :-?

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Two techniques that have been working for me, here in MD, is fishing creature baits with heavy weight t-rigged. I'm making a rainbow cast, getting some height on the cast so the bait punches down through the vegatation. When it gets closer to sunset, I go to a wacky rigged Senko style worm, working it slow on top of the grass.

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For night try to locate a shallower point or flat near deep water.Increase your lure size and add scent and sound.Then slow your presentation down.Black spinners with big colorado blades slow rolled work well for me.I also like a 10" worm in junebug then I add a worm rattle and bead in between my sinker and hook.

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In the heat the bass either go a bit deeper or stick very close to shade and cover. Precision casts are a must for those shallow shade seekers.

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Guest ouachitabassangler

In daylight when it's this hot I head straight for the deepest, thickest matted vegetation out there, but only where a deep ditch or creek cuts through or right next to it. Mostly that's offshore around deep humps with the peaks poking through the thermocline. Lately that's been no deeper than 20 feet, a bit unusual for early August. We're about 2-3 weeks early for a shallow thermocline due to no let up in the heating. Whatever you have to do to find that, it's necessary. In hot water no bass will be below that layer. The visible weed line is pretty much overfished these days, so I focus on deeper weed a little farther out than the obvious slop. As the pool drops new hydrilla is spreading deeper and is short but thick & tender, holding plenty of bass. If the slop stops at a sharp slope with no new hydrilla advancing out, I try to locate bass somewhere down the slope, but not far from the weed line. I ignore main shoreline areas, fishing the isolated colonies not many anglers know about sincethey only work the shoreline.

Because the bass are confined to the ever hotter water above the cool water, they find deep shade and anywhere current might occur, here when the power house is generating. I call for the schedule. Any current will get baitfish drifting down channels around the vegetation. When that begins bass are really fired up and willing to dart out of the mats to grab a meal if it's fat enough. I cast towards the weed line at about a 45 degree angle with a deep diving crankbait on 15# CX P-line so it will stay in the strike zone longer. I'd like to use thinner line but need strength as well as invisibility for when bass run back into the slop. When they do my chances are about 1 in 3 of lipping it. When done working the edge I move the boat to the edge and cast out at 45 degree angles into open water with a C-rigged lizard using 10# CX P-line and a 5:1 baitcaster. The casts are as long as I can make them due to clear water. It takes the lightest line I can dare use to deal with the water clarity.

When done working the edge I make one last run along the edge putting a Yum Buzz Frog or something like it onto the mat and try to drop it into bait trails made by previous anglers, and any holes in the mat. I rip the frog as fast as I can reel with a 6:1 baitcaster and 50# braid on a long flipping rig. If I can figure out where a ditch runs through the mats onto shore I'll poke a heavy jig&pig through it into the ditch run.

For night fishing, which gets most of my fishing hours, I use the frog the same way and same place, but skip the deeper water, moving into shallower. If they want it slower I put a 10" Powerbait worm with the extra scent on 50# braid along the weed lines. If the bite is really light I use Stren fluorescent line with a UV headlamp, seeing bites before feeling them. When the moonlight gets better I put that line away, using braid which shows up pretty good in moonlight.

Those are not the only baits I use, of course, experimenting whenever the bite slows or stops. There's no more exciting lure than a Spook out in clean water near a hydrilla bed.

Jim

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Well, today i had 3 types of rigs.

1. Drop-shot on a frog. I casted near the edges, the middle, everywhere. Not a single hit.

2. T-riged senko, same not a hit

3. When it got alittle darker and cooler i put on a jitterbug, i casted parallel to the shoreline(where i was fishing and saw 2 fishies jump), not a single bite.

EDIT: what are hydrilla?, Nvm found out myself, there are no hydrilla where im fishing. The bottom is like a sandy,muddy rocky kinda area.

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First of all, I make sure I'm on the water before the sun gets up.  A couple techniques that have been working for me lately besides the deep water bite is slop fishing and skipping docks with a senko.  The thing about dock fishing is that not every dock is gonna have fish under it.  Look for docks in the deepest water or with deep water access real close by.

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In daylight when it's this hot I head straight for the deepest, thickest matted vegetation out there, but only where a deep ditch or creek cuts through or right next to it. Mostly that's offshore around deep humps with the peaks poking through the thermocline. Lately that's been no deeper than 20 feet, a bit unusual for early August. We're about 2-3 weeks early for a shallow thermocline due to no let up in the heating. Whatever you have to do to find that, it's necessary. In hot water no bass will be below that layer. The visible weed line is pretty much overfished these days, so I focus on deeper weed a little farther out than the obvious slop. As the pool drops new hydrilla is spreading deeper and is short but thick & tender, holding plenty of bass. If the slop stops at a sharp slope with no new hydrilla advancing out, I try to locate bass somewhere down the slope, but not far from the weed line. I ignore main shoreline areas, fishing the isolated colonies not many anglers know about sincethey only work the shoreline.

Because the bass are confined to the ever hotter water above the cool water, they find deep shade and anywhere current might occur, here when the power house is generating. I call for the schedule. Any current will get baitfish drifting down channels around the vegetation. When that begins bass are really fired up and willing to dart out of the mats to grab a meal if it's fat enough. I cast towards the weed line at about a 45 degree angle with a deep diving crankbait on 15# CX P-line so it will stay in the strike zone longer. I'd like to use thinner line but need strength as well as invisibility for when bass run back into the slop. When they do my chances are about 1 in 3 of lipping it. When done working the edge I move the boat to the edge and cast out at 45 degree angles into open water with a C-rigged lizard using 10# CX P-line and a 5:1 baitcaster. The casts are as long as I can make them due to clear water. It takes the lightest line I can dare use to deal with the water clarity.

When done working the edge I make one last run along the edge putting a Yum Buzz Frog or something like it onto the mat and try to drop it into bait trails made by previous anglers, and any holes in the mat. I rip the frog as fast as I can reel with a 6:1 baitcaster and 50# braid on a long flipping rig. If I can figure out where a ditch runs through the mats onto shore I'll poke a heavy jig&pig through it into the ditch run.

For night fishing, which gets most of my fishing hours, I use the frog the same way and same place, but skip the deeper water, moving into shallower. If they want it slower I put a 10" Powerbait worm with the extra scent on 50# braid along the weed lines. If the bite is really light I use Stren fluorescent line with a UV headlamp, seeing bites before feeling them. When the moonlight gets better I put that line away, using braid which shows up pretty good in moonlight.

Those are not the only baits I use, of course, experimenting whenever the bite slows or stops. There's no more exciting lure than a Spook out in clean water near a hydrilla bed.

Jim

Once again Jim, your detailed answers and obvious experience to bass fishing has me in a state of awe.  I know there are very technical things that can be done in bass fishing but when you start talking about fishing at 45 degree angles over areas where it appears that you can see under the water better than the fish.......you just loose me every time!  I keep thinking to myself, "how does he know there's an underwater creek channel there?"  Then I remember the key ingredient to successful fishing....."Experience!"  I hope that one day, I will be able to acquire a fraction of the knowledge that you have.  Your answers are always technical and precise.  There is always a reason of why you choose what bait and where.  You don't rely on instinct or "a good feeling" about using particular bait.  You're using your previous experiences.

I haven't gone night fishing enough yet to even pretend I know what I'm talking about but I will definitely keep those tips in mind when I do.  Once again Jim, Great tips!!

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Guest ouachitabassangler

;D  Well, one little comment sometimes references another topic, huh? I'll elaborate on the ditch & 45 degree thing.

JB, On lakes I've been fishing several decades I know where the ditches are, under mats of hydrilla. I've walked down many of them in winter at low pool.  :D So yes, experience enters in. I take a hand-held GPS and a digital camera out and WALK the shallows at low pool as soon as it dries up enough, recording what will later be under the vegetation.

How else to detect ditches? Look on shore. See a line of washed rocks, the beginning of a little stream before the lake was flooded? Water still collects above the same as before, eroding the terrain above water. If erosion is above water, some sign of it will be under water unless silted in. But one really heavy rain can sweep silt back off an underwater ditch. I project a land drainage into the water based on how the topography looks.

I also look with sonar. When I pick up a ditch in deep water I follow it back to shallow then make a connect with a clue on shore. I usually see a band of little round rocks that might go unnoticed by a casual observation. Those are bass hallways through their range home. Highways used between seasonal migrations are the big, deep channels farther out from shore. A good paper map will help locate ditches, too. Look at terrestrial topography, finding where topo lines make a U, indicating a valley or ridge. You want to look below the valleys. With experience you can put the map away and just judge the land.

Why 45 degrees? It's simply a compromise between a perpendicular and parallel cast. If I follow a weedline over the weedline and newly emergent weeds a little farther out, I risk spooking catchable bass, especially if I fight a hooked bass down the weedline, but can keep a lure smack on the strike zone depth/edge through a large part of a parallel cast. If I float over deep water casting to the weedline at a more perpendicular angle, I might get my lure down to the right depth, but only for a few seconds, the bait leaving the choice depth/edge too soon. But a 45 degree cast keeps me far enough out not to spook fish in clear water, yet keeping a lure in the strike zone depth/edge a little longer. If I cast to a sweet spot and believe all the bass are stacked up there, then I move closer in to a weedline and make casts to them more parallel so the lure stays at the right depth longer. I'm not saying exactly 45 degrees. A 'half angle' +/- 10 degrees will do fine. I'll get as close to an edge as water visibility allows, making increasingly parallel casts the dirtier the water, farthest out in ultra clear water. If the water is dirty I might flip with boat right on the weedline.

Jim

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