Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Brian_Reeves

An Infantryman's perspective....

Recommended Posts

Cover and concealment.  As an infantryman in the army, we hear these two words used all the time.  Understanding the differences is extremely important to us because these two things can help keep us alive among other things.  This stuff has saved me more than once in Iraq already and will probably do so again when I make my next deployment.  

Ironically, cover and concealment apply to fishing as much as it does for frontline warfare.  Understanding these differences and targeting them accordingly has paid off for me more than once on the water.  

First off would be the definitions in my understanding and training.  Cover is something that you can completely hide behind.  It is a solid object that stands between you and your opponent.  It could range from a hill or a tree.  A rock or low ground.  

The next is concealment.  Concealment is basically a hiding spot.  It won't stop a bullet but it will hide you from the enemy for awhile...at least long enough to keep you safe until your next move.  Shadows, thin grasslines, isolated structure....starting to see how this ties into fishing yet?

From what I've read here, saw on the water, and had some successful experiments, fisherman (like the good ole infantry) have to adapt to the types of topography and vegetation that is around them.  When fish hold up tight into cover, we have to break out the soft plastics, jigs, and flipping baits.  They have to be able to bust through the cover like a HEAT round from a tank and get to where the fish are.  When they are hiding in the shadow of a dock, we can crank and spinnerbait them to our livewells and stringers.  I'd call that suppressive fire.

Everytime I hit the water, I add up as many factors as I can.  I look at the air and water temperature, wind direction and speed, sunrise/sunset, and cloud cover.  In determining how I approach a certain spot, I am thinking of how I should place my casts.  Does the cover or structure that I am fishing cast a shadow?  Are the fish going to roam around it or hold tight to it?  And obviously, what should I throw to get their attention?  Figuring these situations out quickly has allowed me to waste less casts (critical when you're on time constraints like myself.)  And by casting the correct baits, I stand less of a chance of ruining a spot by hanging up a crankbait somewhere I should be fishing a T-Rigged tube or a jig.  On the flip side, I can cover shadows and whatnot much more effectively with a crankbait instead of trying to finesse a place to death with a carolina rig.  

Obviously you have to go with what the fish are telling you and what your depthfinder is saying, but thinking about this kind of stuff beforehand can help improve your chances of catching fish even before you hit the lake.  A quick glance at the weather and fishing reports, some time during the commercials on TV to tie up your rods with the correct baits, and a little bit of mental prep can help you adapt to changes on the lake much more quickly.  

I hope this little bit helps somebody out there that has trouble telling what type of bait to use and when.  Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thats a cool way to look at it.

Thanks for serving by the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting thread.

Good job Aint Texan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ouachitabassangler

I love those kind of posts! Great post. Applying applicable lessons of life to hunting & fishing is what makes you good at it. Looking for any kind of game without being in control of your surroundings leaves only Lady Luck on your side.

This matter of cover v concealment is interesting. I read about an experiemt with bass in a big tank. Nothing but water was in there with them. Then a straight black line was drawn on the glass at one end. All the bass moved as close to it as they could stack up against. That wasn't a matter of concealment, but of cover. Bass cherish cover and willl accept whatever best cover is available, even though an object doesn't benefit the bass much. One little stick poking up off bottom can hold a dozen bass.

Concealment is something every angler has blundered upon. Ever drifted right up to a big stump that only appeared to be a stump, but held a 7# bass now making waves past you? The bass was concealed around cover even though in full view, though not recognizable, his concealment broken by his movement. If that bass stops off at a 1" wide branch, he's found inadequate though acceptable cover, but could blend in to be well concealed.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a pretty nifty anology for fishing. Next time I am out I think I will try that line of thinking. Nice job. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I love those kind of posts! Great post. Applying applicable lessons of life to hunting & fishing is what makes you good at it. Looking for any kind of game without being in control of your surroundings leaves only Lady Luck on your side.

Jim

Thats is a powerful couple of sentences if interpreted correctly.  Probably one of the most fundamental and impacting posts I have read.  Jim is 100% right knowing your surrounds and how to put them to your benifit is not only a hunting/fishing technique but a life lesson that should be used.  Being observant of how something or someone acts you can usually predict the next move.

If any of you guys are die hard bow hunters you know exactly what I am talking about.  Watching a family of deer walk by.  The mother will always be aware of her surroundings and know exactly where her young and easiest escape route is.  On a different forum I posted something along these lines about patterns.  I compared people to fish and patterning them.   I think some missed my whole meaning.  Everything has a pattern whether you relize it or not.  Every animal does something for a reason.  Unlocking the meaning of these actions and learning to applying them will benifit you in every life experience.

This is a great topic, one of the best I have seen in awhile.  These types of topics are my favorite because they make you think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to the positive remarks.  Good to know that I make sense and ain't getting laughed at for comparing to modern day warfare with fishing lol.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ouachitabassangler

Well, here goes for another parallel life experience. I learned a long time ago that whether human or game animal, a runner tends to look back at what's behind. I had a hard time learning that in high school track. Just run and don't worry about what's behind you, looking back only from across the finish line. Same goes for an enemy soldier being followed. Eventually he has to stop, then will look back to locate a pursuer. Looking back too often takes away from walking into other dangers. Before he stops, be walking right behind him, and stop when he stops, stopping hopefully near some cover, concealed. You are then still within shooting range. That tactic works for a spooked buck. If you see the whitetail and hear the loud gasping, he's running away. Run after him if you are on the ground. He can't hear you while he's running. A young buck might look over his shoulder while running, but an old one won't. He'll run out 100-200 yards then stop dead still behind a tree to detect anything behind (mainly looking for movement), wanting to know what spooked him. They always stop close by. If you ran with him, you are still in shooting range. Wait for him to move. You learn that in the military. Don't be the one moving.

It all applies to bassing. Let the bass move, letting you see it first. That's one lesson.

If you spook a big bass off a choice stump, do one of two things. Drop back and wait for it to return or give it time to stop probably no more than 20-30 feet away, where the bass will hold until it can figure out what, if anything, to do about being spooked. They are lazy, not willing to expend precious calories running a long distance everytime spooked by an angler's shadow, a big bird, a bigger fish, a limb falling in the water. Keep in mind sudden spooky things happen to fish all the time. I've seen bass spook when a sudden sharply defined cloud shadow swept over them. I too have been startled by those shadows that come without notice. I put a little finesse worm in the general area I think the bass ran to, let it slowly sink. I might help it get over the little interruption, only to be interrupted again by my hook.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing reels

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...