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airborne_angler

Does this make any sense..Please explain

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Was browsing through consumer reviews for a particular soft plastic bait over at the Bass Pro website.

One of the people writing a review said if you match the bait color to color of the bottom of the lake,you will have  success.

Now that doesnt sound right to me,What about when the water is 30 feet deep,and you cant tell if the bottom is weedy or rocky,and if you do know it is rocky,how do you know what color the rocks are?

I know Im really just reading into the guys comment and over analyzing it,but seriously take a minute to think of that statement and see if doesnt sound a little ridiculous.

Here is the comment he posted over the Bass Pro

"This bait is absolutely magic !!

It catches bass, pike, perch, Sander (European walleye) and accidentaly other fishes...

Choose a color according with the color bottom of your favorite lake, rig it texas on a 2/0 wid gap hook, and fish it everywhere the fish could be... YOU CAN'T GO WRONG !!!"

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Heres some food for thought.

When i fish lakes with red clay banks,  I have seen crawdads that are reddish in color.

When I have seen crawls in the grass, they appear to green or lighter in oolor.

   Think about life in the wild.     When a fawn is born in Texas, it has spots to help hide it amoungst the spring flowers and other blooms.

    I see lizzards that change in color to blend in with trees.

   Alot of mother natures creatures that are small blend into their surroundings, so I don't think he's way of base with his opinion.

   

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Matt Fly nailed it I think.  I guess on the one hand you want something to make it stand out a little bit from the background, but still look somewhat like the bait a bass would expect to see in that area.

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I think a lot of it has to do with the kind of bite you are getting - if you are looking for more of a reaction type strike you may want something that stands out - if you are looking for more of a feeding bite, you want to have something that looks more like what the fish are hunting for.

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I always try to match my bait color to something of the surrounding area. If it is spring and the trees are becoming green then I'll try chart. If tere is a pinkish colored grass I will try to find a bait closer to that color. I beleive this techniqe works but as you said you can't see the bottom. What I would do is just try matching the things that you CAN see. If the lake is 30 feet deep then I doubt there is much grass on the bottom because of the lack of sunlight. Just try focusing on the surrounding grasses and rocks trees and banks.  ;)

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I always try to match my bait color to something of the surrounding area. If it is spring and the trees are becoming green then I'll try chart. If tere is a pinkish colored grass I will try to find a bait closer to that color. I beleive this techniqe works but as you said you can't see the bottom. What I would do is just try matching the things that you CAN see. If the lake is 30 feet deep then I doubt there is much grass on the bottom because of the lack of sunlight. Just try focusing on the surrounding grasses and rocks trees and banks. ;)

Yes but there is cover at that depth, especially fishing spring and fall/winter patterns. I have also found that staying within the realm of the natural colors is a good idea but enhancing those colors makes a big difference.

There is a reason that animals camouflage into their surroundings. If they can't camouflage easily they are picked off as prey. I think differentiating colors make it an easier target for bass. For example its been proven that my lake may not have a large population of blue craws. But there are facts that craws genetically produce true blue craws. You probably don't see them because they get picked off much more easily.

Differentiating colors can sometimes make a big difference IMO.

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I think it makes sense if you do know the bottom colors then what most of what the other guys said makes sense too.

:-/

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The "rule of thumb" is in high visibility conditions you want to obscure your lure -roughly matching the bottom is one way to do it, as prey has already figured out how to do this by matching it's surroundings pretty well.

In low vis conditions the idea is to make a lure standout from the surrounds (white, black, fluorescents).

Also, in situations with aggressive fish, especially in high competition with their others, in which the bass will move a distance to intercept a lure, a more visible lure can be a good idea.

If you can't see bottom match the water color. Or, do as I and many others do and not sweat it -just choose an earth tone you like and fish with confidence.

There are a number of ways to obscure a lure (depending on background) -matching the bottom or water color is one.

BTW:

"This bait is absolutely magic !!

...rig it texas on a 2/0 wid gap hook, and fish it everywhere the fish could be... YOU CAN'T GO WRONG !!!"

I hope you don't actually believe all that.

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Well...Ya wanna know what "bait" the person was talking about?

The review he made was about a ZOOM Baby Brush Hog.

I can say maybe its not a magic bait but its pretty close.

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Marketing catch word in lieu of saying use natural colors or match the hatch, so to speak.

The problem with that statement is it flies in the face of common sense, as you can't see the lake bottom most of the time. It would say brown would cover most lake bottoms; light cinnamon to dark chocolate, take your pick.

I guess that leaves out all the warm colors, blues, purples, chartreuse, white, black, pearl, silver, if you see gold pick it up.

WRB

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Lol If I'm not mistaken, ZOOM baits are made in Louisiana and yes the babybrush hog or the larger regular brush hog are used around here by just about everyone that owns a fishing rod. They are really great baits especially in a watermelon color. I beleive in them. But to say they are magic idk. But the two fish I'm holding up in the picture came off of one. One's 6lbs the other 3lbs. You can say what you want but they have revolutionized fishing around the house.

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;D OK, I give...that's as close to magic as baits come -'cept maybe the Senko (and a few others).

When I hear phrases like that I think "fishing is the last bastion of the snakeoil salesman". Automatic defensive reaction to the bait monkey I guess.

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Lol If I'm not mistaken, ZOOM baits are made in Louisiana and yes the babybrush hog or the larger regular brush hog are used around here by just about everyone that owns a fishing rod. They are really great baits especially in a watermelon color. I beleive in them. But to say they are magic idk. But the two fish I'm holding up in the picture came off of one. One's 6lbs the other 3lbs. You can say what you want but they have revolutionized fishing around the house.

I believe that their baits are made in Georgia. Or maybe it's just their headquarters. But this was on zoom's website, which is currently down:

Zoom Bait Company

1581 Jennings Mill Road

Bogart, GA 30622

706-548-1008

www.zoombait.com

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Well, I 'm one of those stubborn sob 's that don 't believe you have to match anything for your bait to be effective, as long as it looks "alive" and an easy prey the fish will bite it.

My friend Pedro is firmly into the color theory, he don 't catch fish ---> it must be the color of the bait; screw the depth, screw the light penetration, screw the rigging technique, screw the speed of the rerieval, screw the presentation and location, he don 't catch fish ---> the bait doesn 't have the right color  ::).

In one of our trips we were fishing a point about 60 ft in length and 40 ft in width, point sorrounded by a vertical dropoff that plummeted into more than 80 ft deep. He tied a watermelon 5 inch senko weightless, I tied a Zoom Trickworm in Sapphire blue, split shot rigged it upside down ( the blue flake on top ) and proceeded to cast it, 4 casts = 4 fish, meanwhile he kept fishing with his bait with no results and then he begins with his "right color theory", while I ( the stubborn  ;) ) told him that it was not the color, to prove a point I changed the bait color, from Black Sapphire to Black Ruby, 4 casts = 4 fish, yadda, yadda, the "right" color this, the right color that, ok, change again, you using watermelon ok ?, then watermelon it is, now it 's going to be watermelon gold, 4 more fish.

The rocks ain 't red, nor blue, the rocks are whitish gray, so I wasn 't matching the bottom with either of the colors, bass there eat tilapia, so me "matching" the color of tilapia with blue/red/gold is debatible.

Match ? ------> match whut ?

In very few ocassions I 've fished color has mattered, same aplies to "matching", so I don 't pay attention to it.

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If all colors of a soft plastic are the same price then I'll buy greens or browns.  If a specific color is on sale then that's the one I buy.  I don't worry about matching the hatch or matching the bottom (I'll be pretty close to the bottom with greens or browns).

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I tied a Zoom Trickworm in Sapphire blue, split shot rigged it upside down ( the blue flake on top )

Does this really matter?  Can you tell which side will be on the bottom based upon the way the worm is rigged?

I've never really thought of it in that way.

Sorry for the hijack.

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Why I rigged it upside:

Very cloudy, colors like Black Sapphire and Red Ruby have large size metal flake on the belly with a black back ( Blue Sapphire & Midnight Chartreuse ) or dark red, almost black, back ( Black Ruby ). That very large metal flake is like minute mirrors so I rig it upside to capture all the available light I can and make the bait look flashy, waht are you showing ? a flashy blue, a flashy red or a flashy gold.

Watermelon/gold has very fine and tiny gold metal flake, kinda like dust, all over the worm, if you have never tried it you have not noticed that the watermelon color of the worm doesn 't show, what shows is the gold metal flake so you are in practical terms fishing with an almost solid gold flashy worm.

So the presentation was:

1.- Flash from the metalflake on a low light environment

2.- The scratching sound of the sinker rubbing against the bottom when I dragged the worm.

3.- The Trickworm if rigged upside now has a keel, it darts sideways like a Slug go.

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You're right dude. my mistake I'm looking at a pack of them right now. Well that still doesn't change the fact that they work like magic.

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