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Fishing Term?

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hello everyone, ive been trying to get familiar with the lake structures, and looking for some website that have fishing glossary with picture and definition. anybody know any website? by the way can someone explain to me what a feeder channel is? thanks

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Probably, I'd say so.

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Fishing terms are regional and can have different definitions depending where you fish.

I would say in general terms a feeder channel is creek channel that intersects a river channel. It could also be a man made ditch or channel or a cut....all these can be breaks.

Tom

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We have hundreds of feeder canals here, the intersections at the main canals hold good sized fish, works pretty much the same as a feeder channel into a main body of water, but on a smaller scale.

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The power of water is amazing. I am surmising that feeder channels in fresh water attract fish much like in salt water. The canyons are popular fishing areas for lobster and sport fish. Here's an image of the Hudson Canyon.

One might think that a river outlet will carve more of a "channel" the closer you get to the mouth. But, that is not the case as evidenced in this image. How much of a current can there be fifty miles offshore when you take into account the effect of tides, wind and waves on the flow of water. I would tend to think that those would disperse a flow of water, but obviously that's not the case.

Water currents be they in salt or fresh water work according to the same laws of fluid hydraulics. The nature of fish is much the same be it in fresh or salt water. They all look for good feeding grounds. These "intersections" are fertile areas.

hcreleif2ml0.jpg

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The power of water is amazing. I am surmising that feeder channels in fresh water attract fish much like in salt water. The canyons are popular fishing areas for lobster and sport fish. Here's an image of the Hudson Canyon.

One might think that a river outlet will carve more of a "channel" the closer you get to the mouth. But, that is not the case as evidenced in this image. How much of a current can there be fifty miles offshore when you take into account the effect of tides, wind and waves on the flow of water. I would tend to think that those would disperse a flow of water, but obviously that's not the case.

Water currents be they in salt or fresh water work according to the same laws of fluid hydraulics. The nature of fish is much the same be it in fresh or salt water. They all look for good feeding grounds. These "intersections" are fertile areas.

hcreleif2ml0.jpg

That's a great image, and I've found what it represents frequently plays out in natural lakes with current (an inlet and outlet). The creek channel is not always well defined at the mouth, but further out. I assume it is from deposits caused by tail out waters.

Anyway, maybe I'm missing it, but I don't see a feeder channel illustrated there, or do I? I was really hoping for an image that showed that.

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It's hard enough to comprehend regional differences with terminology with bass anglers, adding ocean dynamics maybe interesting, it's also comfushing.

The majority of bass anglers fish man made impoundments, therefor the majority of wriiten bass fishing articals use terms defining reservoirs and the underwater topography of a flooded river valley; the main river bed or channel and the canyon streams or creeks feeding into the main river, now the main body of the reservior.

Natural lakes have few channels, unless they are man made or carved out by glaciers centuries ago. Rivers have feeder creeks and streams, plus man made channels.

Tom

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That's a great image, and I've found what it represents frequently plays out in natural lakes with current (an inlet and outlet). The creek channel is not always well defined at the mouth, but further out. I assume it is from deposits caused by tail out waters.

Anyway, maybe I'm missing it, but I don't see a feeder channel illustrated there, or do I? I was really hoping for an image that showed that.

In the case of the image I posted, the "feeder channel" would be the Hudson River. There is a difference. The Hudson River flows in two directions. In when the tide is rising, and out when it's falling.

If you look carefully at the image, you can see an area (gutter as we call 'em around here) of deeper water that leads to the deep cut of the Hudson Canyon. It amazes me that erosion takes place in water as deep as and deeper than two miles.

I'm making an assumption that the canyon is named because it was created, at least in part, by the outflow of the Hudson River not because of proximity.

Looking at high def maps on my Navplanner2, I see many similar washouts where feeder stream enter the main river or lake. In the case of impoundments, the stream beds were there before the land was flooded. Despite that, after being flooded, the feeder streams still produce currents and eddies in the main body of water that can attract and hold baitfish.

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In the case of the image I posted, the "feeder channel" would be the Hudson River.

I don't think this is what most would consider a feeder channel in bass fishing. Neat image and explanation, though.

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Apparently I did not correctly understand what a feeder channel is. I did a google on "feeder channel" and came up with zero. There were articles about channel catfish, and other unrelated topics containing those words.

In the glossary there was a feeder creek, as a tributary that enters another main river or lake. So, I looked up tributary and got this definition.

"A tributary or affluent is a stream or river that flows into a main stem (or parent) river or a lake. A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean"

By definition, the Hudson River is not a tributary, and hence, not a feeder stream. But, the results are the same, an erosion of the bottom where they enter another body of water, to a far greater degree than most would realize. That is what I was using to show why fish tend to congrate in in these areas.

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A feeder as per Merriam-Webster dictionary: a stream that flows into a larger body of water.

A tributary as per Merriam-Webster dictionary: a stream feeding a larger stream or a lake.

A creek as per Merriam-Webster dictionary: a natural body of running water smaller than a river that flows into a larger body of water.

A bayou as per Merriam-Webster dictionary: a stream that flows into a larger body of water.

Also see: coulee, slough (also slew or slue), stream, wash; canal, channel, cut, cutoff, gut, kill, millrace, millstream, race, watercourse, waterway; affluent, branch, confluent, distributary, influent.

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So let me get this straight...a body of running water which feeds into a body of standing water is considered a "feeder"...and the created channel would then be considered a "feeder channel"...Correct?

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I'm more familiar with the term "feeder creek," living on Lake Ontario. The names are just colloquialisms, and unless you have the actual context of what is being described, you really can't define it.

Here's a "feeder creek" or tributary. Irondequoit Creek flows into Irondequoit Bay, which in turn flows into Lake Ontario. There is a man made channel at the north end of the bay, but I don't really think of this as a "feeder channel."

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll=43.174434,-77.525754&spn=0.011658,0.027466&t=h&z=16&vpsrc=6

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OK, now I'm really confused. First, it was stated that the Hudson River is not a feeder channel. Then it is stated that a "feeder" is a stream that flows into a larger body of water. Then it is stated that the term is colloquial in nature.

In other words, it is amorphous, its meaning changing from one area to another, or called by another name in different areas.

Is the Hudson River a stream, albeit a very large stream?

Be that as it may, or however you wish to call it, the fact remains that the physics of fluid hydraulics works the same where one body of flowing water enters another.

And since we cannot see beneath the surface of the water without distortion, I thought the image of the Hudson Canyon would convey how structure is formed at the confluences.

I was not debating or in any way defining what a feeder channel is. A rose is a rose, is a rose. It was intended solely to illustrate why fish are attracted to these areas.

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hello everyone, ive been trying to get familiar with the lake structures, and looking for some website that have fishing glossary with picture and definition. anybody know any website? by the way can someone explain to me what a feeder channel is? thanks

Roadtrip are you confused yet? As you can see fisherman use lots of terms loosely depending where you are located. One mans creek is anothers brook, stream, or glen. Trying to define a feeder channel without knowing what region of the country the term came from is difficult. In fishing terms a feeder channel generally means a canal channeling water from one location to another.

Tom

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A channel as per Merriam-Webster dictionary: the bed where a natural stream of water runs

A man made cannel is usually dug to divert a natural flow of water and by definition canals are man-made channels for water.

grampa1114, you are correct

J Francho, you are correct also in that all are colloquialisms

WRB, it is not fisherman using lots of terms loosely that create colloquialisms but man in general.

It has long been established that the English language is one of the hardest to learn because a single words can have so many meanings.

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A channel as per Merriam-Webster dictionary: the bed where a natural stream of water runs

A man made cannel is usually dug to divert a natural flow of water and by definition canals are man-made channels for water.

grampa1114, you are correct

J Francho, you are correct also in that all are colloquialisms

WRB, it is not fisherman using lots of terms loosely that create colloquialisms but man in general.

It has long been established that the English language is one of the hardest to learn because a single words can have so many meanings.

Catt I agree.

Sometimes words need to be put into proper context. A river (stream of water) flowing into the ocean (standing water) can be taken out of context when being used to discribe a feeder channel in a bass fishing forum.

I believe fisherman often corrupt the english language; using the word grass for aquatic weeds for example.

I don't intend to make any judgement to whom is right or wrong.

Tom

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I believe fisherman often corrupt the english language; using the word grass for aquatic weeds for example.

Can you really call lush coontail a "weed" though? Seems insulting. :D

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Can you really call lush coontail a "weed" though? Seems insulting. :D

thanks for all the replies guys, aslo what is a creek channel? is it basically a underwater creek?

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A creek channel is always under water, unless the creek has dried up. Pardon my being a bit of a wise guy.

On maps of ponds, lakes, reservoirs, etc that have been formed by flooding lowlands, the old creek channels and river beds may be marked and labelled, along with road beds, bridges etc. It shows where a creek was before the area was flooded.

Here's a section of Pickwick Lake in Tennessee that shows submerged roadbeds, a submerged bridge that runs over a submerged creek channel.

Capture.jpg

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A creek channel is always under water, unless the creek has dried up. Pardon my being a bit of a wise guy.

On maps of ponds, lakes, reservoirs, etc that have been formed by flooding lowlands, the old creek channels and river beds may be marked and labelled, along with road beds, bridges etc. It shows where a creek was before the area was flooded.

Here's a section of Pickwick Lake in Tennessee that shows submerged roadbeds, a submerged bridge that runs over a submerged creek channel.

Capture.jpg

so is that purple line represent a creek channel on the map? btw can you tell me where you got that map? thanks

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That map is from my Navplanner2 program. It's the same map you will find on a premium Navionics chip for this area.

Navplanner2 can be installed on a computer. It includes ponds, lakes, rivers and coastal waters of the contiguous 48 states. Pickwick happens to be a high definition map. The non hi def maps will not give as thorough information as the high def, nor are they accurate regarding position.

The Navplanner2 cannot be used in conjunction with GPS electronics such as Humminbird and Lowrance. They need a chip with the info for a particular area of the country to display maps on the screen.

The programs can be interfaced. You can mark waypoints for courses on the Navplanner2, and transfer them to a storage data chip. When you plug that into the GPS device, it will download them onto the display for that particular body of water.

The Navplanner2 will cost about 130 dollars plus shipping. They may be available at a BPS store. The best price I found, including shipping was from TigerGPS on the 'net. It cost about 130 including shipping.

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The navionics map posted is the best available; 1 foot elevations with up to date surveys. Navionics also offers paper maps, hot maps http://navionics.com/LakeFeatures_HMPaper.asp

Yes, the purple line indicates the approximate creek channel path that feeds into the main river channel.

Excellent map features posted Rhino!

Tom

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