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Carrot Stix Micro Guide Vs Duckett Micro Magic Vs. Dobyns Savvy Micro Guide?

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Debating the 3 rods for finesse 7'-7'3" spinning med-lite to med. Will be used for shakey head, skipping docks, light t rigs, senkos, and other finesse baits.

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Never used the Dobyns so I can't speak for it, but of the other two I like the Duckett better than the carrot stix. I have both and something about the way the tip feels on the carrot stix doesn't suit my feel for the applications you are talking about.

One thing I will add. Even though you didn't mention, might look at a veritas 7' M action. I have found that for shakey head and light t rigs it is excellent and about $50 less than others. I use it for up to a 1/4 oz and out of all my spinning rods, the whole rod suits my feel better than any for those types of applications.

Good Luck and no matter what you choose, ENJOY!

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I have never seen a Dobyns but if it is not bright white or orange I will go for it. More seriously get the one that feels right for you. Regardless of brand or price some rods just feel right to me when I pick it up for the first time. Enjoy!

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Thanks guys I'm leaning toward the Duckett and also considering the Dobyns, I'll have to get out to BPS to feel the Duckett and others..

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For the applications you have listed, I would lean toward the Dobyns 703. If you plan on skipping docks, you will love this rod. I have the 702 Savvy and 703 Champion. The 703 power makes this a very versatile rod.

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I would buy the Dobyns. I have a Savvy 734 and I like it alot. The Dobyns are lightweight and balance perfectly. I am not a fan of anything E21 does. They are terrible looking IMO and feel cheap to me. The Ducketts are nice rods, but I prefer the Dobyns.

One word of advice, the Savvy series have a very light tip, so you may want to step up one power to compensate.

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I felt a dobyns savvy at a tackle store in Benton, KY and it felt like a $300 rod so light and pristine, It's a toss-up IMO between the duckett and a dobyns. We'll see what I get(I currently don't have the money now anways), so it could change but probably going to choose a dobyns savvy micro

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The savvys are nice rods and they would be my pick but I have several Carrot Stix that I wouldn't trade for anything. I hate the looks of the Duckett rods but saw Terry Scroggins boat flip a 10lber with one of the newer model flippin sticks. I really think any would do ok. I personally tend to let the colors of my reel choose the rod or vice versa, but that's just me being stubborn about matching ;)

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Why Micro? I've seen enough, now, to have a better understanding of it and I'm really not sure I buy in to the micro rage. When you consider that Fuji, arguably the finest guides on the planet, doesn't make a micro, there's got to be something behind it. They've done the research and have concluded that you just don't gain anything. From my experience, too, a Micro Spinning reduces your casting distance because in most cases you have to have a 1000 size reel so the line flows into the first guide efficiently, otherwise the loop is too large and you lose distance. For the same money as you're spending on a mediocre rod, you can get a Crucial, you can get a St. Croix, you can get a Loomis if you pay attention. IMO a lot better rods can be had for the money than what you're intending to spend it on. I wouldn't purchase any of the rods you've listed. My opinion, your mileage may vary.

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All a "micro" guide is, is a guide <size 6. Fuji most definetly makes several of them and I use them regularly. On a spinning rod, only the running guides would be "micro" sized. The stripper (1st) and transition (2nd-3rd) guides tame the coils and the line should shoot from there. If a spinning rod does not cast well, It would have more to do with the size and placement of the first three or so guides than the running guides. You have the right idea talking about the coils coming off the reel. The stripper guide should be 1/2 the size of the spool diameter for max efficiency. Moving up the rod, the smaller guides on the tip reduce weight allowing the blank to load and recover quicker as well as balance better. There is no magic to just slapping micro guides onto a blank. The whole system must work together. I like you suggestions of other rod choices, especially St Croix.

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I have never had a micro spinning rod, but on my casting rods, it truely does lighten it up majorly, and that's also what im looking for in my spinning tackle. It will make a 150$ rod feel as light as a 400$ rod with traditional guides, and lightness is a big aspect to look at imo. But if it decreases casting ability on a spinning outfit, the hell with that.

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I think like everyone else is saying that I'd stay away from a micro spinning rod if it has an abnormally small "stripper" guide.

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I have never had a micro spinning rod, but on my casting rods, it truely does lighten it up majorly, and that's also what im looking for in my spinning tackle. It will make a 150$ rod feel as light as a 400$ rod with traditional guides, and lightness is a big aspect to look at imo. But if it decreases casting ability on a spinning outfit, the hell with that.

Read my post again, micro guides do not limit castability. Reducing the size of the stripper is unrelated to runninging guides of any size. Match the reel to a rod with an appropriate size stripper no matter what rod you get and micros (or other running guides) will work as intended. They are even more beneficial on a spinning rod if it is being use for finnese baits.

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I think like everyone else is saying that I'd stay away from a micro spinning rod if it has an abnormally small "stripper" guide.

Stay away from ANY spinning rod with a stripper guide of the wrong size. The running guides have little to nothing to do with castability. As long as the line diameter and connections pass, the smallest lightest guide is the best choice.

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I was planning on pairing it with a stradic 2500

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All a "micro" guide is, is a guide <size 6. Fuji most definetly makes several of them and I use them regularly. On a spinning rod, only the running guides would be "micro" sized. The stripper (1st) and transition (2nd-3rd) guides tame the coils and the line should shoot from there. If a spinning rod does not cast well, It would have more to do with the size and placement of the first three or so guides than the running guides. You have the right idea talking about the coils coming off the reel. The stripper guide should be 1/2 the size of the spool diameter for max efficiency. Moving up the rod, the smaller guides on the tip reduce weight allowing the blank to load and recover quicker as well as balance better. There is no magic to just slapping micro guides onto a blank. The whole system must work together. I like you suggestions of other rod choices, especially St Croix.

That a micro is a sub size six guide is somewhat debatable, but we won't get into semantics. I'm going off of what I was told BY the folks from Fuji at ICAST this year, and what they had to say made a lot of sense, as well as backed up by quite a lot of data. They had some pretty interesting thoughts on it, Mike, you should check into it sometime. (I'm pretty sure they're referencing a micro as being size 4 and 3. The load characteristics they show on a variety of blanks changes dramatically when using standard versus micro, the weight savings of micro being eliminated by the necessity of additional guides to adequately support the blank... All kinds of cool stuff.)

You do, however, make a very valid point about the stripper guide, which is the same I was attempting to make, albeit poorly worded.

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Anglers Resource IS Fuji in the US. From their site:

http://www.anglersresource.net/MicroGuides.aspx

We may have to agree to disagree on this one.:)

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Micro guides are beneficial on casting rods, and also spinning rods if matched correctly, I just casting a micro spinning rod today it was very light and casted well with the specific spinning reel that was applied on the rod, it's is all about how you match them.

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Anglers Resource IS Fuji in the US. From their site:

http://www.anglersre...icroGuides.aspx

We may have to agree to disagree on this one. :)

Nope we won't have to disagree on that. You're 100% right and I'm 100% wrong. Seeing all of the information that I have, which was all published by Fuji, led me to believe incorrectly. I could have wread it wrong, but I don't think I did, I just misinterpreted it to mean something that it didn't.

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I'm not in to micros either, but from your choices I would be most inclined to get the Savvy or Duckett, with a slight lean towards the Savvy.

Those Duckett rods are crazy light. The Savvy won't be as light, but when fishing it will feel lighter.

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I just got a crucial instead at bps, happy with my decision:)

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I am a carrot stix fan. Best rods I have ever fished with. I use the older drop shot model 7.3ft for urban bassin, inshore salt water for snook, small tarpon, etc and sight fishing reds on the flats in ENP. I out cast everyone every time. Drop shot model has super sensitivity and fast action for hook sets. The only thing I am going to do is put grip tape on them as I have basketball player hands so the rod is kind of skinny in my hands. Regardless it's whatever feels best to you.

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I am a carrot stix fan. Best rods I have ever fished with. I use the older drop shot model 7.3ft for urban bassin, inshore salt water for snook, small tarpon, etc and sight fishing reds on the flats in ENP. I out cast everyone every time. Drop shot model has super sensitivity and fast action for hook sets. The only thing I am going to do is put grip tape on them as I have basketball player hands so the rod is kind of skinny in my hands. Regardless it's whatever feels best to you.

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