Jump to content
jmed999

Pan Fry Bass Fillets...

Recommended Posts

I'm going to pan fry some bass and crappie fillets and was wondering how far up to turn the knob on the electric stove. The stove eye goes from 1 to 10 with 5 being medium and 10 being the highest. I'm just going to put a little oil in the pan and let the oil get hot and fry them but not sure what setting to put the stove on. I know in the deep fryer I like it about 375-400 but I have no idea what setting for the electric stove.

Any ideas? Thanks! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to pan fry some bass and crappie fillets and was wondering how far up to turn the knob on the electric stove. The stove eye goes from 1 to 10 with 5 being medium and 10 being the highest. I'm just going to put a little oil in the pan and let the oil get hot and fry them but not sure what setting to put the stove on. I know in the deep fryer I like it about 375-400 but I have no idea what setting for the electric stove.

Any ideas? Thanks! :)

If you have a temp probe that would work better, ALL electric stoves will differ from one to the next, I have to use 7 on mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a temp probe. I wouldn't go higher than 375

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What temp should I try to target with the temp probe? How much oil should be in the pan? 1/4" or so?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go around 6 if you have a knob out of 10 (ie medium high). 1/4 inch is pretty good for oil in my opinion. If I go more than that then I just basically deep fry em haha. Also, I batter the fillets a bit, you may be interested in that? I just do a flour and milk mix but do whatever you want.

When in doubt, smoke it on the bbq (my fav)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It also depends on the pan you're using. I have to go WAY lower since going with stainless, all clad pans. Pan frying as opposed to deep frying leaves a sear on the bottom so your heat level will depend on the cooking time required and type of pan used as a stainless pan requires waiting until the meat "releases" from the pan surface to acheive the best sear and flavor level...and to avoid tearing the meat off the pan when you turn it. It tastes GREAT but requires some trial to get it right.

With a teflon coated pan you've got a lot more room for error but may not get the same sear. A temp probe will be the only way to get the oil as hot as you can without reaching the burn point of the oil. If you don't have one and don't feel like getting one I'd do what others suggested and stick to 6 or 7. Eyeball it so you only have to turn it once while giving each side equal cooking time. After a couple rounds of doing it you should be able to write down the stove setting and how long you cooked it on each side to get it right from then on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What temp should I try to target with the temp probe? How much oil should be in the pan? 1/4" or so?

Thanks!

Frying fish isn't as easy as it sounds. All oils have a threshhold where excessive heat will start to breakdown/burn it and this burnt smell/taste will transfer to whatever food you are frying. Conversely, your oil needs to be hot enough so that when the food is placed into it, the hot oil seals the outside of the food prior to cooking it. If this sealing doesn't take place, the oil will seep into the food you're cooking.

Perfectly fried foods should be somewhat crispy on the outside, completely cooked throughout, and have a light brown (almost tan) color to it. Any color lighter and the food may not be completely cooked. Any color darker than that means food that is either over-cooked, or oil that is beyond it's useful life. You shouldn't be able to taste the oil in the food.

Your #1 goal should be to keep the temp of the oil at 350 when the fish is been put into it, and it needs to stay at that temp. That's the hardest part. You will need to have enough oil in pot/pan to cover the fish that you are cooking. You will also need to add only so much fish at any time to the pot/pan to make sure the oil stays at the proper temp. Putting too much food into the fryer will lower the oil's temp causing some of the problems above. In a deep fryer the signal that the fish is done is "when it floats". In a shallower pan this may not happen. From my experience, 350 degree oil should only take 2-3 minutes to completely cook your filets. Most likely this will require a little practice for you to find the right balance of all these things to find the perfect balance.

One final thought. Monitor the life of your oil. The stuff does get old and starts to break down with every usage, which leads to poor looking or tasting food. Also, using brand new "unseasoned" oil will lead to completely cooked food coming out almost white in color. The secret to perfect looking fried food is to save and then add a small portion of used oil to the pan anytime you are starting out with fresh oil. Just a hint of this old oil will provide for the coloration you are looking for without the old burnt taste.

Sorry for the long reply, but I spent over two years standing in front of a commercial deep fryer for every Friday night fish fry at a local non-profit. I think it ruined me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Lund says all oils are not created equal. For pan frying fish I prefer a vegetable oil, my favorite is peanut oil, it gets real hot, I do not like olive oil for frying fish, doesn't get hot enough. Let the oil get hot before you add the fish, don't let the oil get hot with the fish already in the pan, your fish will sear better and won't absorb as much oil, I want to taste the fish, not be overpowered by the oil. This is personal but I prefer a light breading instead of batter, flour, ryekrisp and matzoh meal is an excellent breading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a few inches of peanut peanut oil in a heavy cast iron pot.

I dredge the fillets in seasoned flour, egg wash, then panko bread crumbs ( japanese style crumbs, found in the asian section of the supermarket)

Fry at 350-375 deg. until golden brown.

Serve with homeade tartar ( mayo, diced dill pickles, fresh lemon juice, S&P).

Outstanding!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frying fish isn't as easy as it sounds. All oils have a threshhold where excessive heat will start to breakdown/burn it and this burnt smell/taste will transfer to whatever food you are frying. Conversely, your oil needs to be hot enough so that when the food is placed into it, the hot oil seals the outside of the food prior to cooking it. If this sealing doesn't take place, the oil will seep into the food you're cooking.

Perfectly fried foods should be somewhat crispy on the outside, completely cooked throughout, and have a light brown (almost tan) color to it. Any color lighter and the food may not be completely cooked. Any color darker than that means food that is either over-cooked, or oil that is beyond it's useful life. You shouldn't be able to taste the oil in the food.

Your #1 goal should be to keep the temp of the oil at 350 when the fish is been put into it, and it needs to stay at that temp. That's the hardest part. You will need to have enough oil in pot/pan to cover the fish that you are cooking. You will also need to add only so much fish at any time to the pot/pan to make sure the oil stays at the proper temp. Putting too much food into the fryer will lower the oil's temp causing some of the problems above. In a deep fryer the signal that the fish is done is "when it floats". In a shallower pan this may not happen. From my experience, 350 degree oil should only take 2-3 minutes to completely cook your filets. Most likely this will require a little practice for you to find the right balance of all these things to find the perfect balance.

One final thought. Monitor the life of your oil. The stuff does get old and starts to break down with every usage, which leads to poor looking or tasting food. Also, using brand new "unseasoned" oil will lead to completely cooked food coming out almost white in color. The secret to perfect looking fried food is to save and then add a small portion of used oil to the pan anytime you are starting out with fresh oil. Just a hint of this old oil will provide for the coloration you are looking for without the old burnt taste.

Sorry for the long reply, but I spent over two years standing in front of a commercial deep fryer for every Friday night fish fry at a local non-profit. I think it ruined me!

Great Post!!!

Even in Commercial fryers used in restaurants the ideal temp is set to 350. As mentioned, do NOT use olive oil!!! It has a much lower burn tolerance and is not suitable for frying. Use a good vegetable or peanut oil. One large misonception is that the oil has to be changed every time you use it. NOT SO! Fryer oil gets "seasoned" every time it is used. When frying chips, fries, etc you can use your oil at least half a dozen times before changing it out. Salt, flour, etc will break down the oil over time and then it needs to be changed. When frying fish you may want to change it out more frequently unless you continue to just fry fish in the oil. Fish will leave that "fishy" flavor on the next item put in the oil. I am sure you have had french fries from Long Johns that tasted like battered cod....

Typically, commercial fryers in restaurants change their oil every 3-4 days and most will filter nightly. So, think how much product gets dropped into an Applebees etc. fryer in an average day. Your 2lbs of fish won't harm the oil. Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once the oil is filtered and put in the refrigerator how long can you keep it until you use it the next time? ie. if you use new oil then filter it and put it back in the original container and keep in the refrigerator for 6 months, is it still good to use the 2nd time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try good, old fashioned lard. Yep, this fat still provides an excellent flavoring to most fried foods, especially french fries!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As mentioned, do NOT use olive oil!!! It has a much lower burn tolerance and is not suitable for frying.

I must dissagree here, I use EVOO in all of my cooking, I use cast iron skillets and medium low temps to pan fry whatever I need.

Granted the lower temps will cause you to have to cook it a little longer but unless you dip the fish in badder there is no need for having a half of a skillet full of oil or grease, the flavor EVOO adds to the fish or any dish is fantastic and once you add the lemon and pepper you are still left with a good fish taste and very little oil to clean up afterwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't overthink it! Medium heat, peanut oil, cast iron pan.\

Yum!

101877797_MMjvv-O.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things that break down oil: Think "CarWASH" (I used to do maintenane at a popular fast food chain)

Carbon - little bits of fried food. Filter the oil after use.

Water - water also prevents a sear so make sure you meat is dry and free of ice if possible

Air - Store in a sealed container

Salt - self explanatory, however, I prefer to salt my stuff before its cooked

Heat - can't help this one but chances are the others will get to your oil before this one does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't overthink it! Medium heat, peanut oil, cast iron pan.\

Yum!

101877797_MMjvv-O.jpg

I dunno J they look pretty good right about now, looks like we just might have to have a cook off...lol.

I come up to NY every now and then for GM training, we might have to go catch supper one evening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This time of year, it would have to be baked trout.....

279582396_yJmBV-M.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J Francho, that those trout fillets look delicious! What do you season them with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Once the oil is filtered and put in the refrigerator how long can you keep it until you use it the next time? ie. if you use new oil then filter it and put it back in the original container and keep in the refrigerator for 6 months, is it still good to use the 2nd time?

Oil does not need to be kept refridgerated. However, six month would be pushing it. Cold air will actually negatively effect oils so keep them at room temp or in a cool area. I have, however, used bacon grease that is sealed up to a year later

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salt, pepper, garlic, paprika, and the secret....some crushed macadamia. Drizzle with olive oil. Cook @ 250° for about 9 minutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't do any deep frying, but my mother did a lot of it. Fried chicken, fried fish, hush puppies and french fries. Most if not all of it in the bacon fat which was saved every time bacon was cooked.

She had one other trick. The first thing that got fried in a new batch of lard was potatoes. Something about frying the potatoes cleaned up the lard is what goes around in the back of my mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

J, Do you like have a picture or a video for everything? lol.

Man those trout look AWESOME, but I am on the way with some blackened Alaskan Salmon filet's...just let me find that darn picture, I know I have one here somewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would strongly advise against eating a bass fillet.

Simply because.

Such a blasphema.

So you'd rather waste a gut hooked fish? Stuff happens, be prepared to eat your errors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×