Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ok guys, so last year was my first real year of bass fishing, and I bought 4 bait casters and used them quite a bit. My question is if I should take them apart and clean them this winter. I have looked at the parts list in the booklet that came with them and it looks like a ton of small parts... So what do you guys think, should I clean them. If so, how difficult is it to clean them and put them back together. Any and all comments are welcome and appreciated. Thanks guys, Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't open them up at all..........too many small parts for my big dumb hands. When I have problem with one I send it to a pro like DVT. But I do perform some maint. on them. At the end of every season I take the spool bearing out, thats easy enough to do as long as you don't let the little clip that holds them in go flying. I soak them in acetone, let them dry, reinstall and add ONE drop of lube to them. I also use a q-tip and clean any gunk that has accumulated in all the nooks and crannys, like up under the "hood" where the level wind is, I clean the inside of the break race, and the spool bearing recesses. I also add a drop or two of oil to the level wind worm gear, wipe the reel down with a lint free rag, and that's about it. About once a month during the season I add a drop of oil to the spool bearings and worm gear as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are planning on the attempt (its not too bad as long as you are systematic in the approach) do it on the cheapest reel you have first to get an understanding of the internal system.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go for it, just make sure you have a schematic for your reel. If you are mechanically inclined you will not have a problem...

 Some tools of the trade.......

 

6DA61D2A.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maico1 is that tool holder a popsicle mold? That's an ingenious idea, wish i had thought of that before.

Maintaining your reels is both satisfying and prudent. Spinning reels can be though but most baitcasting can be done by its owner. Many tutorials to help you step by step on lots of specific models can be found at alantani.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maico1 is that tool holder a popsicle mold? That's an ingenious idea, wish i had thought of that before.

Maintaining your reels is both satisfying and prudent. Spinning reels can be though but most baitcasting can be done by its owner. Many tutorials to help you step by step on lots of specific models can be found at alantani.

Yes it is.....Just the right size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the very least, remove the sideplate, spool and spool bearings.  Clean and lube the bearings and the spool shaft. After replacing them, clean the line guide and level wind and you have 2/3 of the cleaning process done.  If you feel that you need to get into the guts of the reel, do it systematically and maybe even take pics with your smartphone of the differnt steps. Think of it as field stripping the reel rather than your weapon.  A complete dissasemble isn't always warrented or necessary for that piece of equipment to perform.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not mechanically inclined so I take my reels to Wayne Knabe in Powhatan, Virginia for cleaning.

I was taught at an early age that if you want to buy jewelry you go to a jeweler.

So if you want to have your reels cleaned professionally you go to someone who knows how to clean reels.

With that said, you can take Large Mouth Gambler's suggestion and practice on a less expensive reel before you attack your favorite reels.

If you can locate a local guy who cleans reels he may allow you to sit with him and watch him clean one of your reels so you can learn first hand what to do and what solvents and greeses to use.

As stated above, cleaning your reels can be satisfying, especially if you don't end up with a few parts sitting on the table!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have never opened one up, then don't.... :eyebrows:

 

Send them in yearly for a proper servicing...

 

 

Tight Lines!   :fishing1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you have never opened one up, then don't.... :eyebrows:

Send them in yearly for a proper servicing...

Tight Lines! :fishing1:

Ya think Mike at DVT ever opened up his first reel?

If you want to do it, there has to be a first time.

I remember when I built my first computer. I was nervous, but I did it. Since then, I have built over 100 units.

Gotta start somewhere. By the way, I am posting this from a computer I built myself.

Go for it guy!!

Hootie

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have big hands fat fingers i leave it to the pros i tried a few on my own and like fixing a car always end up with spare parts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used these 2 videos when I did my first one. He shows you about everything you'll need to know. I also lay out a piece of cardboard and set my parts down in order as they are removed. So then you can just reverse the process when you put it back together. Worst case scenario you'll end up with some extra parts and you send it to someone and they will fix it. At least you will have the chance to learn it yourself or realize it's not for you this way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take mine in for service locally, usually 3-4 days, spinning $16-20, my Avet conventional was $20.  I've learned for anything more than a cleaning the manufactures service dept  has served me best.  Dealing with professionals generally will give me some recourse if I'm unhappy, doing it myself all I can do curse like hell when I f.u.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having watched those videos, I'm glad I sent mine to Mike at DVT.  There is little doubt but that I'd end up with extra parts...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you have never opened one up, then don't.... :eyebrows:

Send them in yearly for a proper servicing...

Tight Lines! :fishing1:

I have been cleaning my own reels since I was 10, dont say it shouldnt be done. You have to start sometime, and somewhere. 20 years of maintaining my own stuff, and Shimano reels havent changed that much. I can now do it blind folded if I needed to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot depens on what kind of a reel.  If it's Korean (Abu, Phlueger, Lews, etc, I've heard they can be a real pain.  A lot of reel guys won't touch them and you might really need an expert like DVT or RM.   If it's a Shimano, it might be more straight forward.  If it's just a slight cleaning, you might be OK either way.  Major cleaning, I would use a one of our guys who post here.   The guys who say go for it have a point.  You need to learn somehow.  But you very well may break it or wind of with a box of parts and need to send it to them anyway.  You do have an advantage in having one or more.   Get one messed up and take a look at the other to see what you did wrong.   If you have the money, a reel guy is a good investment.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well now I am a little nervous. most of my reels are Lew's , so I dont know if I want to tackle those. I do have a couple of Shimano's, I have an older Curado that I dropped in the water last year I may practice on. Thanks for the input guys, much appreciated. Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lews reels are setup just like the BPS PQ. I own all lews reels and I used that video to learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks rippin. Appreciate it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem. Just take your time and be patient. Set your parts out in order and pay attention to the direction some of the smaller stuff goes in. I took pics with my phone of some things. If you get fed up,walk away for a few minutes. The first time I did it was on a new reel I'd just got. They are typically over greased from the factory. I took the same reel apart and back together probably 8-10 times. I kept putting this little spacer/sleeve in backwards 'unaware at the time' and when I tightened the drag star down the reel wouldn't free spin. Thought I broke a brand new reel I never even got to fish with yet but I got it. It is worth learning to do it yourself to me. Cheapest I've found is $16 per reel. I'd be looking at $96 plus shipping every year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ya think Mike at DVT ever opened up his first reel?

If you want to do it, there has to be a first time.

I remember when I built my first computer. I was nervous, but I did it. Since then, I have built over 100 units.

Gotta start somewhere. By the way, I am posting this from a computer I built myself.

Go for it guy!!

Hootie

Good for you!.... :Victory:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been cleaning my own reels since I was 10, dont say it shouldnt be done. You have to start sometime, and somewhere. 20 years of maintaining my own stuff, and Shimano reels havent changed that much. I can now do it blind folded if I needed to.

Good for you............ :Victory:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×