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Polarkraft05

Feeling The Fish Before The Bite

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Im watching major league fishing, and there has been a few times that they feel that there is a fish there, then wait 2-5 seconds before setting the hook and catching the fish. 

Im not real experienced at bass fishing, so explain to me how they are feeling the fish then waiting several seconds before setting the hook.

Is the bass carrying the bait before they decide to set the hook?

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When a bass is following a bait, the water flow around and over the bait is changed similar to air flow when a truck comes up behind a car. An experienced driver can feel it without looking in the mirror.  Water is denser than air and a change in the feel of a bait is easily detected by the angler that is very familiar to what that bait normally feels like.  Bass, unlike some other predator fish, don't follow lures for any length of time. The decision to strike or not occurs quickly so as not to expend energy. I'm talking about lures like cranks and spinnerbaits here.This could be the reason they're waiting, because the fish hasn't committed. When it does, they set the hook.

On other types of lures, especially big plastics, the bass may need time to get the lure completely in it's mouth and or turn it for the purposes of killing it's prey or swallowing it.  Some anglers wait for the fish to do just that with their bait before setting the hook.  I often will say something like 'there he is' before setting the hook. In my case, I'm getting into a better position to set the hook. 

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Agree with papajoe. There's that "sense" that your bait is being taken in, killed, spit out, taken in again...the old TAP TAP and then you set the hook.

 

Sometimes I'll feel the first hit, count "One ... two ... THREE/set hook"

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When a bass is following a bait, the water flow around and over the bait is changed similar to air flow when a truck comes up behind a car. An experienced driver can feel it without looking in the mirror.  Water is denser than air and a change in the feel of a bait is easily detected by the angler that is very familiar to what that bait normally feels like.  Bass, unlike some other predator fish, don't follow lures for any length of time. The decision to strike or not occurs quickly so as not to expend energy. I'm talking about lures like cranks and spinnerbaits here.This could be the reason they're waiting, because the fish hasn't committed. When it does, they set the hook.

On other types of lures, especially big plastics, the bass may need time to get the lure completely in it's mouth and or turn it for the purposes of killing it's prey or swallowing it.  Some anglers wait for the fish to do just that with their bait before setting the hook.  I often will say something like 'there he is' before setting the hook. In my case, I'm getting into a better position to set the hook. 

 

Great post!

 

 

:fishing-026:

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What were they fishing at the time. You can watch the line and see it pause, flick, jump, move off... reel down, smash em!

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When a bass is following a bait, the water flow around and over the bait is changed similar to air flow when a truck comes up behind a car. An experienced driver can feel it without looking in the mirror.  Water is denser than air and a change in the feel of a bait is easily detected by the angler that is very familiar to what that bait normally feels like.  Bass, unlike some other predator fish, don't follow lures for any length of time. The decision to strike or not occurs quickly so as not to expend energy. I'm talking about lures like cranks and spinnerbaits here.This could be the reason they're waiting, because the fish hasn't committed. When it does, they set the hook.

On other types of lures, especially big plastics, the bass may need time to get the lure completely in it's mouth and or turn it for the purposes of killing it's prey or swallowing it.  Some anglers wait for the fish to do just that with their bait before setting the hook.  I often will say something like 'there he is' before setting the hook. In my case, I'm getting into a better position to set the hook. 

Wow that is a good explanation. 

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What were they fishing at the time. You can watch the line and see it pause, flick, jump, move off... reel down, smash em!

Yeah the best feeling ever when I see the line do any of them, I do however love it when it moves off the most.  I remember how excited my 1st fish out of heavy/thick vegetation, pitching my bait into open pockets.  My line just moved off to the right, waited a second and set the hook.  It was hard to keep my excitement down and not set the hook too early.  I was like wow this actually works like on TV!  I was a total newb with a smile ear to ear. 

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My background in fly fishing made me a line watcher. 90% of a trouts diet is sub surface and I learned to fish subsurface things like nymphs and eggs without a strike indicator. When I was fishing every day I almost had a sixth sense. I could tell a fish took it sometimes when there was no indication.

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If you know bass are in the area and what depth they are likely to strike, you have a "feel" the bass will strike and become highly aware of slight stike indicators. Feeling a lures hydrodynamic swimming motion change is way over the top, feeling a bump or lose of vibration indicating a missed strike and anticipating the bass may return and strike agian is closer to what happens.

Tom

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You guys are reading too much rod manufacturer's propaganda...

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i think it's just more of an instinct thing. like what most others have mentioned, if i feel something 'different' i'll just stop. watch the line, slowly pull back to see if there is weight etc. it's pretty awesome to see your line swimming off. that's my favorite pre hook thing to see. sometimes it's much more subtle like a tap or a slack line. sometimes you feel it, sometimes you see it. sometimes both. i obviously fish mostly plastics though. 

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I'd love to say that I have this "sense" but I've got plenty of room to learn. When I feel a bass hit, I pounce on that thing and set the hook immediately. Not sure I have the mind/adrenaline control to be casual or meticulous about it. 

 

And whenever I land my first fish of the day, I always exclaim "Thank you Lord" and "Thank you Fish" for making the trip worth it. Noob's gonna noob.

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Yeah the best feeling ever when I see the line do any of them, I do however love it when it moves off the most.  I remember how excited my 1st fish out of heavy/thick vegetation, pitching my bait into open pockets.  My line just moved off to the right, waited a second and set the hook.  It was hard to keep my excitement down and not set the hook too early.  I was like wow this actually works like on TV!  I was a total newb with a smile ear to ear. 

 

I remember the first time I had this as well, it was a 3lb Bucket fishing a 6in plastic worm. Tossed it out couple jigs and all of sudden my line was slowly moving off to the right against the current and I knew it was time to set! BAM fish on!! It was a great feeling, like I had finally graduated from Fry to Minnow hahahaha. 

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When a bass is following a bait, the water flow around and over the bait is changed similar to air flow when a truck comes up behind a car. An experienced driver can feel it without looking in the mirror.  Water is denser than air and a change in the feel of a bait is easily detected by the angler that is very familiar to what that bait normally feels like.  Bass, unlike some other predator fish, don't follow lures for any length of time. The decision to strike or not occurs quickly so as not to expend energy. I'm talking about lures like cranks and spinnerbaits here.This could be the reason they're waiting, because the fish hasn't committed. When it does, they set the hook.

On other types of lures, especially big plastics, the bass may need time to get the lure completely in it's mouth and or turn it for the purposes of killing it's prey or swallowing it.  Some anglers wait for the fish to do just that with their bait before setting the hook.  I often will say something like 'there he is' before setting the hook. In my case, I'm getting into a better position to set the hook. 

Wow! Great post! Take that Bill Nye The Science Guy!

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AFoster, great post!

 

I still get heart palpatations when I see my line start to move to the left or right knowing that a bass  (hopefully an eight pounder) has the bait in her mouth and is swimming away with it.

 

You will find this happens the most when throwing the stick baits of your choice. So always WATCH YOUR LINE.

 

Another time to change undies is when she blasts your topwater frog and you have to wait a few seconds to set the hook. Very difficult to master.

 

The biggest problem you will encounter is allowing the fish to have the bait for too long and having the bass swallow the bait and having to extract it from deep in her mouth. This is why I always preach to bring a needle nose pliers with you no matter where you fish, be it a pond, river, lake or ocean. Needle nose pliers are a bass fisherman's best friend.

 

We have had posts on this site about removing a deeply swallowed baits via the gills. I have done this a few times and it works so if anyone out there remember those posts or any videos please add them to this discussion. You need to learn how to do this if you do not know.

 

Just go out there and throw those stick baits (Senko types) and topwaters and post pics. Of the fish, of course, not the EMT's treating you for a heart attack or your pants!!!!!

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Great tips and tricks, I fish a lot on plastic lures and bottom fishing you guys just put Me back to my early year on bass fishing, the line was moving to my left, the weight was on the line and "BOM" set the hook... 

 

And the " L " came up, loser :cry4: lost a great fish probably a 5er, I will say I don't have a great sensitive fingers and I know that is a problem but I can scan the line. I'm still working on feeling the fish swiming around the bait. 

 

Great post, thanks guys.

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You guys are reading too much rod manufacturer's propaganda...

 

ghoti. posted a rather detailed study he conducted. He concluded that his hands were not

sensitive enough to truely appreciate the claims of high-end rods. He is a very good fisherman 

and a friend of mine. I know his conclusion is true of himself and probably true for a large

percentage of anglers. However, that does not apply to everyone. The feel of the most subtle

change is well know to many. For those fisherman the sensitivity issue is important.

 

Better equipment does not make a poor fisherman good, but it might make a good fisherman better!

 

 

:fishing-026:

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Wow that is a good explanation. 

I think you watched Bill Dance a few weeks ago. He described that exactly the same way.

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ghoti. posted a rather detailed study he conducted. He concluded that his hands were not

sensitive enough to truely appreciate the claims of high-end rods. He is a very good fisherman 

and a friend of mine. I know his conclusion is true of himself and probably true for a large

percentage of anglers. However, that does not apply to everyone. The feel of the most subtle

change is well know to many. For those fisherman the sensitivity issue is important.

 

Better equipment does not make a poor fisherman good, but it might make a good fisherman better!

 

 

:fishing-026:

I agree as a fly fisherman the rod can make the difference in a good and great fisherman.

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If I'm fishing along the shoreline much of the time I'm seeing the wake of the fish follow my bait, so I'm ready for the strike.  When I'm fishing where depth is involved I'm not seeing the wake if the fish is coming up to hit that bait, I just react when I feel the strike, with experience probably most people are on auto pilot. In open water and using a moving lure, not seeing the bait or movement of the fish, I don't sense anything, just the strike as it happens.

When I'm fishing a bottom bait, if my line is moving I'm setting the hook, rocks don't swim.

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Super light rods and reels help you can feel the difference in the weight or lure resistance going through the water better than with heavier weight tackle. Detecting strikes from bass you can't see is about changes in the line movement caused by the bass engulfing your lure and this happens a lot more than you know.

If rod sensitivity has anything to add it's allowing the angler to detect line moving or no movement. Bass don't have hands, they can only affect the lures movement or weight by striking it with their mouth, not by looking at it or swimming near it......set the hook, swings are free.

Tom

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