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Confidence In Spinning Gear

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I have two bass rods currently one a baitcaster and one spinning.   I have used spinning and spincast most of my life and just recently picked up the BC rig from a buddy of mine.  I feel a lot more comfortable with the feel and use of the spinning rod.  Is there anyone who uses only spinning rigs? Is there any application where a spinning rig just won't measure up?  I'm sure with enough time I will be comfortable with the BC but I just feel so much better with my spinning gear right now.

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Hmm...

 

Spinning gear = finesse

 

Baitcasting = power

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Is there anyone who uses only spinning rigs?

 

Yes, I do. I use 6'6" rods with M or MH power and fast action and use these rigs, for cranking, soft plastics, topwater including frogs and whatever else I do. I use 15# braid which I think has a much higher breaking strength than the rating. 

 

I'm not trying to tell anyone to avoid baitcasters, just that I feel comfortable using spinning gear. I have successfully horsed in large bass (large by New York standards) that were buried in heavy, dense algae mats without problems.

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If you prefer Spinning, go with it. I use both. Spinning is not jut for finesse. I use a heavy duty spinning setup for skipping under docks and boats. You can flip and pitch and even skip baits with a baitcaster, but try getting a bait way under a pontoon boat - from the back where you only have about a 1 square foot hole to fit your bait. Easy with spinning gear and you need heavy stuff to yank the fish out of there without getting wrapped around a post or something. I'm pretty sure there are guys that will say they can do this with baitcasting gear and there may be some that can, but I've never seen it. On TV or in person. Use what you're comfortable with.

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Spinning isn't JUST for finesse, but it's an general rule of thumb. It's hard to put heavier line on a spinning reel without line twist.. When times call for 15lb fluorocarbon, or even 12lb fluorocarbon... How will you manage? Braid works, but it isn't ideal for all applications by any means. 

 

 Flipping, Punching, Frogging, Cranking, there's many techniques where 12lb+ line or 50-65lb braid is ideal and none of that is ideal for a spinning reel.

 

 Stick with it, you'll get more comfortable and you'll wonder how you ever preferred spinning setups in the first place!

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Go with whatever you are comfortable with. Yes, there are some applications where the baitcasting outfit would make your job easier, but that is not to say you can't still use spinning gear. One of the best examples that I can think of to illustrate this point is the buzzbait. Using a baitcasting reel, the bait lands without slack in the line, so it doesn't have a chance to sink before you pull it across the surface of the water. With a spinning reel, the buzzer lands with a lot more slack, so you have work harder to bring up/keep the lure at the surface at the start of your retrieve. So yeah, the baitcaster has an edge in this situation, but you can be equally productive with a spinning reel if you make adjustments to your technique (reel incredibly fast once your bait hits the water, grab hold of your line and pull back on your rod to keep the bait on the surface when it hits, or cast slightly up onto the bank and drag it into the water). I can think of a few other examples too, but won't go into detail. I guess the short answer to your question is yes, there are a number of situations where the spinning outfit doesn't measure up to your baitcaster, but that doesn't mean you can't still use the spinning combo for those applications. You just have to work a bit harder, and if you are already used to doing it, why change now? By the way, everything I said totally works in reverse too- there are plenty of times when I would choose a spinning reel over anything else.... But its all about what helps you to personally get it done in the most effective way possible and you gotta go with what works best.

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If you use heavier line on spinning reels you need to adjust your tackle. 15 lb line on a 2500 reel would probably be a mess. But on a reel with a larger diameter spool like BPS Pro Qualifier or Johnny Morris makes it a snap. Soak the line in KVD and your good. Best way to prevent line problems is to close the bail manually after casting and make sure there is not a loop forming. I flip the bail over and pull the line tight while raising the rod and very very rarely have any problems. Your going to get twist with certain lures. Before making a cast let the lure dangle. It will probably spin around a bit. If it spins like a top you might want to take steps to remove the twist. Watch Flukes tried and true method for how to do that.

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The right spinning set up can be used for just about anything.  Addressing bass or other freshwater fishing, IMO the "power" comes from the rod more than the reel.  Many 2000 or 2500 bass sized spinning reels have more than enough drag and cranking power, a 4000 series even more if needed.  It's all about being comfortable with your own gear, I can cast for distance with any type of lure (the rod has more to do with that than the reel), I can flip or pitch, I can troll,  I can jig, can use crankbaits and flukes, and I can fish with live bait, then go catch a 15# jack cravelle on the same outfit which I've done dozens of times.  I think 15# braid is the perfect line for a 2000 reel.  Finesse or power fishing are merely words, I don't do either, I just go fishing and catch all kinds of fish doing whatever I want to with spinning gear.

If there is a negative, which has never been one for me, it's overall weight of the combination.  I've fished for hours with 15 oz reel on an 8' rod without getting tired.

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Hmm...

 

Spinning gear = finesse

 

Baitcasting = power

 

X2.

 

Baitcasters for treble hook baits, stick baits, spinnerbaits, Chatterbaits, Carolina rigs, jigs, topwaters, frogs, toads and fishing in heavy cover and in structure where you need power to drag the bass to the boat or bank.

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You will get used to it. It took me a little while when I first started

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Spinning isn't JUST for finesse, but it's an general rule of thumb. It's hard to put heavier line on a spinning reel without line twist.. When times call for 15lb fluorocarbon, or even 12lb fluorocarbon... How will you manage? Braid works, but it isn't ideal for all applications by any means. 

 

 Flipping, Punching, Frogging, Cranking, there's many techniques where 12lb+ line or 50-65lb braid is ideal and none of that is ideal for a spinning reel.

 

 Stick with it, you'll get more comfortable and you'll wonder how you ever preferred spinning setups in the first place!

 

Yep. As SirSnook said you can do it all with spinning if you want to. You can't do it all with the same combo without making serious compromises though. Punching heavy mats, bouncing a med/deep crankbait, or working a light shakyhead/finesse worm require very different equipment. While line and rod choice are the primary differences, most of us are far more comfortable using either spinning or baitcast gear depending on the technique.

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I have a friend who swears by spinning gear only.  He does everything with it so there is no reason to switch if you don't want to.

 

I enjoy using both and IMO it makes power fishing much more efficient.

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I was just like you years ago. Spinner was my outfit of choice. I was introduced to b/c and I slowly started to get the hang of it. I am no Bassmaster elite angler with them but I can hold my own. Right now I use b/c 85% vs 15% spinner. You have to give the b/c time if you really want to learn how to use it. If you truly don't, stick with the spinner.

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X2.

 

Baitcasters for treble hook baits, stick baits, spinnerbaits, Chatterbaits, Carolina rigs, jigs, topwaters, frogs, toads and fishing in heavy cover and in structure where you need power to drag the bass to the boat or bank.

Sam, I'm a bit confused to what is meant by power.  Not only do my 2000 reels have similar or stronger drags than just about every low profile reel in the Shimano line up, but with a longer handle on spinning I think I may have more leverage when cranking.  I think some people could make a very good argument spinning may have the edge in power, at least as far as the reel goes.  A mh spinning rod for example, as I understand it is the same blank as the casting model.  Not being a b/c user myself, I've been led to believe people using b/c gear use heavier rods, IMO creating the illusion b/c has more power.  I could take a spinning mh rod and just as easy land a 20# + fish as any b/c user.

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Hmm...

 

Spinning gear = finesse

 

Baitcasting = power

 

 

This is pretty much my mantra.  I have one REALLY NICE spinning setup and one "ok for now" baitcast setup.  The spinner sees all my plastics and finesse/smaller tackle and my baitcaster sees all the frogs, cranks, big swimbaits etc.

 

I prefer the feel or spinning but recognize the need for a setup with significantly more beef for bigger baits and deep actions.   

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Sam, I'm a bit confused to what is meant by power.  Not only do my 2000 reels have similar or stronger drags than just about every low profile reel in the Shimano line up, but with a longer handle on spinning I think I may have more leverage when cranking.  I think some people could make a very good argument spinning may have the edge in power, at least as far as the reel goes.  A mh spinning rod for example, as I understand it is the same blank as the casting model.  Not being a b/c user myself, I've been led to believe people using b/c gear use heavier rods, IMO creating the illusion b/c has more power.  I could take a spinning mh rod and just as easy land a 20# + fish as any b/c user.

 

Most people will find retrieving moving baits, deep divers and heavier lures much more comfortable with baitcasting equipment.

Although I use both types of equipment, my recent bout with "fishing elbow" currently restricts me to spinning tackle. For me at

least, I don't like spinning tackle for anything but weightless soft plastics and live bait.

 

 

 

:fishing-026:

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Sam, I'm a bit confused to what is meant by power.  Not only do my 2000 reels have similar or stronger drags than just about every low profile reel in the Shimano line up, but with a longer handle on spinning I think I may have more leverage when cranking.  I think some people could make a very good argument spinning may have the edge in power, at least as far as the reel goes.  A mh spinning rod for example, as I understand it is the same blank as the casting model.  Not being a b/c user myself, I've been led to believe people using b/c gear use heavier rods, IMO creating the illusion b/c has more power.  I could take a spinning mh rod and just as easy land a 20# + fish as any b/c user.

It's certainly not the "drag" that is the issue... Spinning reels have good drags, and you're right about the handles, leverage isn't an issue... 

 

 Spinning reels do feel flimsier though, there's more play in the parts, and they don't "feel" as solid... This is all just my opinion and how it ties into my confidence in the rod and reel I'm holding.

 

 What is not opinion and is fact however.. Is the fact that there are FAR less spinning rod models to choose from, and there's many techniques and baits that cannot be effectively fished... Swimbaits, Frogs, Umbrella Rigs, Punching... There's tons of baits in which you want a stout, yet still sensitive rod.. There's not many offered in a spinning setup.

 

   12-20lb Fluorocarbon doesn't sit well on spinning setups... Casting distance and control isn't quite the same either. 

 

 

 

 There's a reason no one in the Elite Series or FLW uses a spinning rod for flipping... 

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     I have a friend that has been guiding for bass for over twenty years.  Every client rod on his boat is spinning.  When I joined him,  I have over a dozen rods on my boat for clients,  all spinning.  We fish the pads and grass of the Potomac River for bass and snakeheads with buzz toads and hollow bodies.  7' MH with 3000 series spinning reels.  30-40# braid.  I had a cancelation one night and decided to fish by myself,  with the same tackle that I ask my customers to use.  I had a blast.  Spinning tackle can be less of a hassle than baitcasting,  especially with any decent wind.  

 

     The vast majority if not 99% of anglers fishing the Chesapeake Bay for stripers via light tackle jigging,  are using 2500-3000 series reels and 6' 6" spinning rods and 15-20# braid.

 

 Personally,  I love my baitcasters but,  I won't hesitate and have complete confidence picking up THE RIGHT spinning tackle for the job.

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Hmm...

 

Spinning gear = finesse

 

Baitcasting = power

Agreed, but all the finesse fishing I do is with a baitcaster, besides DS. I use super shallow spooled baitcasters for everything else finesse.

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Like everything its just a confidence issue as of now. The first time i took my baitcaster out i quit using it after 15 minutes and went back to my spinning setup.  Once you get the first fish with it youll like it a lot more. In the beginning i recommend only throwing heavier lures.  cast around in your backyard to get comfortable.  Then once you are confident you can catch fish with it, start working on lighter stuff and what settings work best.

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     I have a friend that has been guiding for bass for over twenty years.  Every client rod on his boat is spinning.  When I joined him,  I have over a dozen rods on my boat for clients,  all spinning.  We fish the pads and grass of the Potomac River for bass and snakeheads with buzz toads and hollow bodies.  7' MH with 3000 series spinning reels.  30-40# braid.  I had a cancelation one night and decided to fish by myself,  with the same tackle that I ask my customers to use.  I had a blast.  Spinning tackle can be less of a hassle than baitcasting,  especially with any decent wind.  

 

     The vast majority if not 99% of anglers fishing the Chesapeake Bay for stripers via light tackle jigging,  are using 2500-3000 series reels and 6' 6" spinning rods and 15-20# braid.

 

 Personally,  I love my baitcasters but,  I won't hesitate and have complete confidence picking up THE RIGHT spinning tackle for the job.

I couldn't agree more !

As far as spinning rods not being available in heavy enough sizes is beacuse people are not looking in the saltwtwater section.  I have spinning rods that can handle almost any weight lure, no difference in the blanks and many of these rods have cork grips too.  I find spinning to be much more comfortable when throwing lures of any size, I like the weight of the reel on the bottom of the rod, no rod twist that way with 30# fish, and plenty of backbone and cranking power for about any species.

I may get sore elbows once in a while from offshore fishing, aj's, kingifsh, tuna, shark, never from bass fishing, put a band on my arms and fish anyway.  I don't let anything get in the way of something I want to do.  I was in PV, Mexico catching a 100# amberjack, lots of 20# dolphin and large snappers, sore so I couldn't raise my arm to comb my hair, played golf the next day and did more deep sea fishing on that trip..........sometimes ya just gotta man up.

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Yes, I do. I use 6'6" rods with M or MH power and fast action and use these rigs, for cranking, soft plastics, topwater including frogs and whatever else I do. I use 15# braid which I think has a much higher breaking strength than the rating. 

 

I'm not trying to tell anyone to avoid baitcasters, just that I feel comfortable using spinning gear. I have successfully horsed in large bass (large by New York standards) that were buried in heavy, dense algae mats without problems.

This fits my thinking exactly! I have never had a problem with the power of spinning gear, but as Marty stated, big bass for New York standards are like average fish for the south.  (I've even caught snapping turtles out of lily pads and a huge catfish through dense weeds with my dad's 35 year old light action spinning rod without a problem. haha)

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