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Soft Jerkbaits- Different Brands For Various Techniques?

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So who uses different brands for things like: Rate of Fall; Ripping; Slow Twitch etc.?

 

I like the Havoc Jerk for a slow retrieve.

 

Slug-go for topwater.

 

Fluke gets the nod for ripping in warm water.

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I use Flukes and Bass Assassins for fishing fast on top and Caffeine Shad for fishing deep and dead sticking.

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Yamamoto D Shad deeper w/slower retrive & Caffeine Shad up top w/ faster retrive.

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who uses different brands for things like: Rate of Fall; Ripping; Slow Twitch etc.?

 

Surprising how different companies making almost the same design of soft plastic can be as different as night and day. Take the Beaver and Ugly Otter. Both the same in body but different because of the Otter's paddle tail. The drop is totally different. The Otter also uses less salt.

 

The Houdini Shad with it's paddle tail is much different that the Zoom Fluke, but similar when the tail is shaped with a knife to look like a rear fin. Most fluke designs act the same regardless of company as long as body and tail shape are the same. Old Bay Side flukes are no different in action than Zoom's.

 

Grubs are different acting due to tail shape and especially tail thickness.

 

Senkos and Yum Dingers are obvious in their differences - each exhibiting their own advantages via plastic and salt differences.

 

Curl tails added to any plastic worm versus a thin paddle tail, does something to the fall rate, body motion and tail action, but all in all, all curl tail plastic worms are pretty much the same as long as the body shape is similar to the original Mr. Twister.

 

I love soft plastics, including making my own designs or modifying existing ones. Unlike hard baits, you never know when something even slightly different will make a soft plasticdesign more provocative.

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Skinny Dippers for slow steady retreives.  Flukes as jerkbaits, and with underspins.

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I've used different ones because to me they are all very different, the slug-o is not a fluke and vice versa. I have now settled on 2 baits from a small manufacturer that are killer, the River Rock Baits Jointed Jerkbait and the River Rock Baits Twitchy Minnow. The twitchy has more of a side to side glide while the jointed jerkbait has a darting, more erratic type action and so the twitchy is used when the fish are a little slower to chase while the jointed works best when fish are active. I also found the Jointed jerkbait to be a killer on the back of a chatterbait but as I said, I use both because they are completely different even though they are all soft jerkbaits. I do like the bigger mass produced baits like the Fluke and Slug-o, in fact the 4.5" slug-o was my absolute favorite and my second with the Super Fluke Jr. as both had different actions but I found that the small manufacturer offered me more with softer plastic and that is a big deal to me when T-rigging because I can use lighter line and not have to worry about the hook not going through the plastic.

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Good responses Guys.  I have to try those underspins. They're subtle with just a little flash and vib.

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I use most of the time Zoom Super Flukes, I do have other brands (Bruiser and Caffeine Shad)..but in general I use them all the same way.  I did buy some BPS version and find that it works best dead sticking and drop shot, not used at all as a jerkbait.

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The Strike King Caffeine Shad is the most versatile in my opinion. Great fast on the surface or slow at any depth. Big plus is horizontal fall and tail shimmy action like a senko. Only thing is they are very soft and usually a one or two fish bait. But one or two are better than none.

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The Strike King Caffeine Shad is the most versatile in my opinion. Great fast on the surface or slow at any depth. Big plus is horizontal fall and tail shimmy action like a senko. Only thing is they are very soft and usually a one or two fish bait. But one or two are better than none.

My favorite as well. Still fish plenty of super flukes, slug-o, d-shads, and a few other miscellaneous soft jerkbaits. D-shad is good for deeper water weedlines, the fluke has the best erratic action for shallow cover, and the caffeine shad has the best dying baitfish resemblance plus it casts very well.

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Quick question - Which bait would you use when fishing in moderate current? How would you rig it? How would you work it? I have been experimenting with this and can't seem to get it right. Sorry to get off topic!

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Quick question - Which bait would you use when fishing in moderate current? How would you rig it? How would you work it? I have been experimenting with this and can't seem to get it right. Sorry to get off topic!

I don't often find myself fishing waters with much to any current really. If I had guess which one would best it could be any really. I would start experimenting with adding some kind of weight to offset the force of the current. I would see if there would be any way to insert a nail weight into the bait. Second choice might be a keel weighted hook that is fairly light weight ... maybe a 1/8 ounce weight. Last option may be something like a scrounger head or a light swimbait or jig head.

Overcoming the force of the current will be challenging. By adding weight you will obviously lose some action effectiveness of the bait vs the bait in its weightless form.

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I don't often find myself fishing waters with much to any current really. If I had guess which one would best it could be any really. I would start experimenting with adding some kind of weight to offset the force of the current. I would see if there would be any way to insert a nail weight into the bait. Second choice might be a keel weighted hook that is fairly light weight ... maybe a 1/8 ounce weight. Last option may be something like a scrounger head or a light swimbait or jig head.

Overcoming the force of the current will be challenging. By adding weight you will obviously lose some action effectiveness of the bait vs the bait in its weightless form.

Excellent response Kickerfish1.

I use both the nail insert, as well as a keel weighted worm hook. My preference on hooks is again, dependent on the brand of jerkbait.

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My favorite off-set hook for rigging soft plastic jerkbaits is the Texposer, by Lunker City. Lunker City is the company that produces the Slug-go. The reason I prefer is hook is because of the long point, which is ideal for holding a bait in place that's texposed, of course.

 

Here is a picture:

 

 

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Thanks hookseton3. The hook photo you posted looks excellent as well for that style of bait!

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Fish a zoom fluke t rigged on or subsurface for fresh, salt is a DOA 5.5" jerk shad on a jig head.

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Zoom fluke is my favorite.  Watermelon red, watermelon glitter, black, or shad.  Can be fished a bunch of different ways.  I try to let the fish tell me how they want it.

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Hook up with a custom plastic maker who makes a fluke knockoff and have them make it with their Senko formula plastic so they sink slowly.

 

Now THAT is the best idea i have heard in a while.....off to find a plastics maker.

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I really like the Fluke for shallow fishing, and the D-Shad for getting deeper a little quicker. If I'm fishing in more current I like to take a Storm Suspen-Strip and wrap that around the hook shank to keep the lure down. 

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Super Fluke for any depth I just adjust rate of fall with nail weights and heavier gauge hooks.  I agree that Lunker City's Texposer Hook is great for flukes.  For bigger fish I throw Castaic Jerky J's.

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Thanks hookseton3. The hook photo you posted looks excellent as well for that style of bait!

 

Oh your welcome. I tried them all and I will tell you, that Texposer was designed from it's ***, to hold a soft stick bait perfectly.

 

I have them in every size. They really stick the fish, too.

 

Good fishing.

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Add the YUM Houdini to the mix.

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Skinny Dipper, or Big EZ for casting with varying retrieves,

 

Super Fluke [only on spinning gear] or Sluggo for twitching

 

 

 

Mike

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