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ranger_88

Braid Vs Fluorocarbon

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Best setup ive ever used on spinning gear is-

Mono backing, 15lb power pro braid main line, and a fc sniper flourocarbon leader

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They both have there time and place. I only use fluorocarbon but I know a lot of guys on here use braid with fluoro leader.

Braid pros - very castable and mangeable, no stretch, cuts through vegetation, and last a long time. Cons - hard to break off, visible, and lacks slack line sesnstivity.

Fluoro pros - pretty much invisible, slack line sensitivity, lack of stretch compared to mono, sinks, and last a pretty long time.

Cons - can be pricey and hard to manage sometimes.

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definitely braid with a fluoro leader on a spinning reel. Nothing casts better or is more manageable than braid and line twist is a non issue. Plus if you always use a mono or fluoro leader it will last practically forever. 10-20 lb power pro super slick is my personal favorite for all my reels.


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btw, the fluoro leader gives you that invisibility that helps get bites and the abrasion resistance that is key around rip rap. And if you need slack line sensitivity, chances are you're fishing vertically and can tie on a leader long enough to make it back to the reel. And finally it saves you on pricey fluoro lines, even though red label is really all I think you need for leaders since there isn't enough line for memory or stretch to have a noticeable effect.

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There is no one correct answer. I dislike braid and prefer fluorocarbon, with the exception of crankbaits and topwater baits for which I use mono. You will hear from many who will tell you braid is the only answer. It is not, buy the only way of knowing for yourself is to see what works best for you. Enjoy the process!

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As KMac said, you'll get a range of answers.  For me, its neither.  I don't think I'll ever put flouro on a spinning reel again.  I like Yo-Zuri hybrid.....jury still out on braid on spinning gear...I like it, but don't love it.

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They both have there time and place. I only use fluorocarbon but I know a lot of guys on here use braid with fluoro leader.

Braid pros - very castable and mangeable, no stretch, cuts through vegetation, and last a long time. Cons - hard to break off, visible, and lacks slack line sesnstivity.

Fluoro pros - pretty much invisible, slack line sensitivity, lack of stretch compared to mono, sinks, and last a pretty long time.

Cons - can be pricey and hard to manage sometimes.

 

 

I think this sums it up well except that fluorocarbon actually stretches more than mono...

 

You have to look at the above factors sprint61 listed and decide what works for how you fish best.  Personally, I agree with Choporoz too and wouldn't spool up a spinning reel again with fluorocarbon.  Its too often a rats nest waiting to happen... especially for a newer fisherman which I don't know if the OP is... but it can be a frustrating and expensive experiment many of us have been through at some point. 

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I slowly transitioned from FC to either braid or mono. I don't use a leader of any kind on spinning gear. You can't convince me fish care that much if they'll bite an Bama rig made of 5 wires. Plus the water is always stained here. Braid is the bomb on spinning gear. Never a twist on a quality reel.

 

I went back to 15# mono for my T rig BC combo. Just gotta retie often.

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First-I think it's most important to ask the question you're asking if you're really looking to expand how you fish. The most experienced people on here will tell you different types of lines give you better chances of catching fish because they give you the best presentation or are best in certain types of cover. If you're looking for an all around line, you'll have to admit to yourself that it's going to limit what you can do.

 

However, if you use primarily one setup, you're asking about the best all around option.

 

In my opinion, the best all around option for a spinning setup is NOT flouro. It's going to give you poor presentation for most topwater lures. It's also going to be a pain in your butt managing in windy conditions or when line twist comes into play.

 

In my opinion, braid or mono are going to be better as all around lines.. I'd recommend a good braid, but if you're fishing weightless plastics you're going to have a poor presentation, and there are sooo many times where that's the best option.

 

Mono does most things pretty well, excels at cranking and topwater, but can knick and fray and isn't the strongest, so it's poor in heavy weedy cover.

 

I feel like I'm talking in a circle because I guess I am here. Don't pick one. Save 50 bucks, get a second setup, and cover more bases by having multiple options. Otherwise, you're going to spend too much on line, waste too much time changing line to fit the situation, and still not be able to quickly adapt. Two rigs, one with braid, the other with fluoro, will tackle almost any situation. If you don't have two setups, go with mono. I believe it's the most versatile. People caught fish on mono almost exclusively for half a century.

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I think this sums it up well except that fluorocarbon actually stretches more than mono...

 

You have to look at the above factors sprint61 listed and decide what works for how you fish best.  Personally, I agree with Choporoz too and wouldn't spool up a spinning reel again with fluorocarbon.  Its too often a rats nest waiting to happen... especially for a newer fisherman which I don't know if the OP is... but it can be a frustrating and expensive experiment many of us have been through at some point. 

that all depends on the flourocarbon you use , i really don't think there is a mono line that stretches less than Sunline Sniper , much less Sunline Shooter or Toray Super Hard Strong

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It's always been braid with flouro leader for me. However, I'm slowly moving over to Gliss with Flouro leader.... so far so good. Hoping to make my final judgement on that up on Erie in the next few weeks.

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First-I think it's most important to ask the question you're asking if you're really looking to expand how you fish. The most experienced people on here will tell you different types of lines give you better chances of catching fish because they give you the best presentation or are best in certain types of cover. If you're looking for an all around line, you'll have to admit to yourself that it's going to limit what you can do.

 

However, if you use primarily one setup, you're asking about the best all around option.

 

In my opinion, the best all around option for a spinning setup is NOT flouro. It's going to give you poor presentation for most topwater lures. It's also going to be a pain in your butt managing in windy conditions or when line twist comes into play.

 

In my opinion, braid or mono are going to be better as all around lines.. I'd recommend a good braid, but if you're fishing weightless plastics you're going to have a poor presentation, and there are sooo many times where that's the best option.

 

Mono does most things pretty well, excels at cranking and topwater, but can knick and fray and isn't the strongest, so it's poor in heavy weedy cover.

 

I feel like I'm talking in a circle because I guess I am here. Don't pick one. Save 50 bucks, get a second setup, and cover more bases by having multiple options. Otherwise, you're going to spend too much on line, waste too much time changing line to fit the situation, and still not be able to quickly adapt. Two rigs, one with braid, the other with fluoro, will tackle almost any situation. If you don't have two setups, go with mono. I believe it's the most versatile. People caught fish on mono almost exclusively for half a century.

That's a pretty good answer. Really you could use more than two set ups but I get your point. As far as brands go, some of the best braids are powerpro and sufix. Fluro, Sunline, Seagur. Mono, Sufix, Berkley, or even good 'ole Stren.

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My best effort here would be a basic guideline but not knowing the how, what, why, where & when about your fishing makes it tough to go beyond that. 

 

If I fished where you fish, with the same techniques, presentations & baits you use, I would be much better equipped to offer an appropriate & effective line choice recommendation.  

 

The reason I could do that, and this is important, is because I 've tried several different types of lines in various fishing situations.  This has supplied me with a good base line of knowledge that has and will continue to serve me well when picking fishing line.  

 

Sometimes it takes a while to find "The Best One" for each situation, but it's definitely worth the time & effort.   Fortunately this method take practically NO Special Skills at all.  One simply needs to be willing to do it.   The knowledge is gained is priceless.  

 

 

A-Jay

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Did not like braid on spinning at all.. went to naofil and its a no brainer

Pretty much using mostly heavy nanofil on all but the biggest setups

Never liked the stretch mono brings and dont like the breakage of low# fluoro

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that all depends on the flourocarbon you use , i really don't think there is a mono line that stretches less than Sunline Sniper , much less Sunline Shooter or Toray Super Hard Strong

 

I posted my own independent line stretch tests earlier this Spring.  I tested 9 fluorocarbon lines and 9 mono/co-polymer lines.  In regards to Sunline Sniper, the good news is that it stretched less than any other fluorocarbon line in the test.  However, all 9 mono and co-polymer lines stretched less than Sniper.  Happy to re-post or send the test results via PM.  Don't want to go too off course for what the OP is looking for though...

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I posted my own independent line stretch tests earlier this Spring.  I tested 9 fluorocarbon lines and 9 mono/co-polymer lines.  In regards to Sunline Sniper, the good news is that it stretched less than any other fluorocarbon line in the test.  However, all 9 mono and co-polymer lines stretched less than Sniper.  Happy to re-post or send the test results via PM.  Don't want to go too off course for what the OP is looking for though...

list those 9 lines , send them in a pm

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I posted my own independent line stretch tests earlier this Spring.  I tested 9 fluorocarbon lines and 9 mono/co-polymer lines.  In regards to Sunline Sniper, the good news is that it stretched less than any other fluorocarbon line in the test.  However, all 9 mono and co-polymer lines stretched less than Sniper.  Happy to re-post or send the test results via PM.  Don't want to go too off course for what the OP is looking for though...

 

Hence the rise of all these ultra stiff extra fast blanks, which hinder castability, bait placement, fish fighting ability, and durability. Much better to get your give out of your rod and not your line, especially on a long cast.

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braid use power pro

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Instead Power Pro, I now use sinking Hevicore braid... One additional reason not to have to use fluorocarbon as a main line...

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Fishing from the shore, I was just using braid today at a local pond, and it was a pain. I could never really "get in tune" with my unweighted craw, as the braid would never sink. Just floated in the breeze. Even when there was no wind, the braid just sat at the top of the water. I always had to slightly move my rod tip just to feel the lure. Such a PITA. I could never really feel those subtle bites, and would recommend Fluoro or Copoly whenever you are fishing from the shore with lures that aren't heavy.

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Hopefully my new experiences can help you out a little.

I just recently (within the last four months) got back into Bass fishing after a fifteen (+) year absence. The last reel I bought was a Cabela's Prodigy back in 2003 because at that time I didn't even own a rod/reel and felt I needed something. It went on a Berkley Lightning Rod, got spoolled up with some good ol' 12lb Stren clear/blue and proceeded straight to the corner of my garage until I finished out a 12yr tour in the military. It moved everywhere with me but never once got fished.

Fast forward a few more years after settling into civilian life again; I pulled it out (about four months ago), cleaned all the factory grease and oil out of it and started to fish a bit.

The next thing I did was get on the Internet to find out what had changed in 15yrs. A LOT!!

The old Prodigy wasn't quite cutting it for me. As a boy, teenager, and young man (pre-military) Bass fishing was my life. I was a member of BASS, fished in 12-15 local tournaments, was even gifted a small bass boat to further my favorite thing in life. In those days I was pretty easy going about gear but I got a lot of great "pass down" gear from some great club members. So I guess I was a bit snobish when comparing the gritty grind of the Prodigy to the last baitcaster I'd fished years ago.

So, again to the Internet to see where the spinning and caster tech had gone in all that time. Not really that far apparently (other than the range of gearing out there), but smoothness and precision are a couple of things I have noticed out of the box. I remember having to break reels in with a few hundred casts/retrieves to get them buttery smooth. Those days seem to be gone.

Anyway (sorry for the wind), I started with what I knew (Shimano and Abu) and picked up a Stadic spinning reel and a Revo SX geared in 7:1:1. Locked them both down to Gander Mountain Elite GSX medium heavy (6'.6"/7') rods that I managed to catch on sale for $75, and you guessed it, a couple of spools of Stren clear/blue. I fished those two setups for about two weeks daily.

At the end of those two weeks I came to a couple of conclusions.

First, worming skills are perishable. At some point in time I was "the worm king of the East" (haha not really), and could pull at least one fish out with a worm when everyone else came up empty handed. I'm nowhere near that anymore, but getting there.

Second, mono is stretchier than I remember it (haha, see my first conclusion). I've probably lost more fish in the last four months than in the first 19-20yrs of my life because of bad worm hook sets. I don't ever remember having to set a hook so hard.

Third, Right now Abu has the best line of Revo's they've ever had. In four months I've bought five Revo's (SX10, SX20, SX 7:1, SX 6:4, Revo MGX 7:1). Just to compare (the last four months) I bought 3 Lew's baitcasters, 2 daiwa spinning reels, the Stradic, a used Sustain, a new Curado, a Quantum Exo, and a Quantum Catalyst spinning and baitcaster. Again, all on the GSX Elite rods and Stren line. The Revo setups go with me every time.

Fourth, Shimano spinning reels don't feel the same. I only ever used Shimano spinning reels, I loved them. The Revo SX spinning reels now feel like the old Shimano's and the new Shimano's feel like the old hollow, light feeling Daiwa's. I used to love the way a Shimano spinner used to almost want to get away from you because they were so smooth. You could just give them a good crank and they'd spin forever. The closest any of the new Shimano reels come to the old feeling is the Spirex. That's cool because of the price point, but the trigger and lack of infinite anti-reverse is less than desirable. Not to call out Shimano, just about all of the spinning reels I've felt in the past few months have had the same light, hollow feeling. That's not all bad, just kind of miss that old Shimano feel.

Fifth, the Gander GSX rods are the best value in the market right now (they are still on sale for $79 on Gander's website). They are cutting corners somewhere to get to that price point but you get all the good guts nonetheless. You can't complain about 40ton Toray blanks, ti eyelet frames, evolve inserts and reel seat for $79. I've fished them everyday (yes everyday) for the last four months and I am not nice to my gear. I normally Velcro wrap six rods together, throw them over my shoulder, and walk about a mile through the woods to get to my favorite spot (I no longer have a boat so all my fishing is done from shore).

And finally I get to the relevant part.....Six, mono line is no longer cutting it for me for the all around perfect setup. I have read, read, read, scoured, read, scoured, then read some more about line. None of that reading helped. The Internet is filled with opinions and rants (much like this one) of other people that may or may not have actually done anything that they have an opinion about. The ou way to know for sure is to test your gear yourself. So, I went out and bought a spool of every line I could get locally to re-spool every couple days. Fireline, Spiderwire, 832, Stren/Berkly/Suffix/Seaguar Fluro, P-line...if it was hanging on the shelf at Gander or Cabela's I probably bought it.

I stopped fishing right around when Spiderwire was just coming out. I used it a little and wasn't real fond of it so I always stuck with mono.

Braid has changed a lot in the last decade. 832 and Power Pro have stayed on my spinning setups with 12lb Seaguar Fluro leaders and Fluro backer on the spool (I had a lot of line left over).

100% Fluro has stayed on all my baitcasters (except for two which have 30lb braid and 14lb Fluro leaders for ripping frogs through a pond that is 95% lily pads, 5% actual water). I haven't really felt a huge difference in the Fluro lines unless you step up from 10 to 14lb test.

Sorry for the long winded response. I figured I would give a little background and how it applies to line. Since I've dialed in MY line setup I'm back to smashing fish on worms (normally weightless Senkos), and back to fishing worms 90% of the time.

I fish super clear to almost mud and feel I'm covered no matter what with the Braid/Fluro or straight Fluro in every clarity or cover.

But that's just me!

Hope it helps out.

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Instead Power Pro, I now use sinking Hevicore braid... One additional reason not to have to use fluorocarbon as a main line...

i was checking that stuff out , a review in another thread would be appreciated !! :eyebrows: 

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Hopefully my new experiences can help you out a little.

I just recently (within the last four months) got back into Bass fishing after a fifteen (+) year absence. The last reel I bought was a Cabela's Prodigy back in 2003 because at that time I didn't even own a rod/reel and felt I needed something. It went on a Berkley Lightning Rod, got spoolled up with some good ol' 12lb Stren clear/blue and proceeded straight to the corner of my garage until I finished out a 12yr tour in the military. It moved everywhere with me but never once got fished.

Fast forward a few more years after settling into civilian life again; I pulled it out (about four months ago), cleaned all the factory grease and oil out of it and started to fish a bit.

The next thing I did was get on the Internet to find out what had changed in 15yrs. A LOT!!

The old Prodigy wasn't quite cutting it for me. As a boy, teenager, and young man (pre-military) Bass fishing was my life. I was a member of BASS, fished in 12-15 local tournaments, was even gifted a small bass boat to further my favorite thing in life. In those days I was pretty easy going about gear but I got a lot of great "pass down" gear from some great club members. So I guess I was a bit snobish when comparing the gritty grind of the Prodigy to the last baitcaster I'd fished years ago.

So, again to the Internet to see where the spinning and caster tech had gone in all that time. Not really that far apparently (other than the range of gearing out there), but smoothness and precision are a couple of things I have noticed out of the box. I remember having to break reels in with a few hundred casts/retrieves to get them buttery smooth. Those days seem to be gone.

Anyway (sorry for the wind), I started with what I knew (Shimano and Abu) and picked up a Stadic spinning reel and a Revo SX geared in 7:1:1. Locked them both down to Gander Mountain Elite GSX medium heavy (6'.6"/7') rods that I managed to catch on sale for $75, and you guessed it, a couple of spools of Stren clear/blue. I fished those two setups for about two weeks daily.

At the end of those two weeks I came to a couple of conclusions.

First, worming skills are perishable. At some point in time I was "the worm king of the East" (haha not really), and could pull at least one fish out with a worm when everyone else came up empty handed. I'm nowhere near that anymore, but getting there.

Second, mono is stretchier than I remember it (haha, see my first conclusion). I've probably lost more fish in the last four months than in the first 19-20yrs of my life because of bad worm hook sets. I don't ever remember having to set a hook so hard.

Third, Right now Abu has the best line of Revo's they've ever had. In four months I've bought five Revo's (SX10, SX20, SX 7:1, SX 6:4, Revo MGX 7:1). Just to compare (the last four months) I bought 3 Lew's baitcasters, 2 daiwa spinning reels, the Stradic, a used Sustain, a new Curado, a Quantum Exo, and a Quantum Catalyst spinning and baitcaster. Again, all on the GSX Elite rods and Stren line. The Revo setups go with me every time.

Fourth, Shimano spinning reels don't feel the same. I only ever used Shimano spinning reels, I loved them. The Revo SX spinning reels now feel like the old Shimano's and the new Shimano's feel like the old hollow, light feeling Daiwa's. I used to love the way a Shimano spinner used to almost want to get away from you because they were so smooth. You could just give them a good crank and they'd spin forever. The closest any of the new Shimano reels come to the old feeling is the Spirex. That's cool because of the price point, but the trigger and lack of infinite anti-reverse is less than desirable. Not to call out Shimano, just about all of the spinning reels I've felt in the past few months have had the same light, hollow feeling. That's not all bad, just kind of miss that old Shimano feel.

Fifth, the Gander GSX rods are the best value in the market right now (they are still on sale for $79 on Gander's website). They are cutting corners somewhere to get to that price point but you get all the good guts nonetheless. You can't complain about 40ton Toray blanks, ti eyelet frames, evolve inserts and reel seat for $79. I've fished them everyday (yes everyday) for the last four months and I am not nice to my gear. I normally Velcro wrap six rods together, throw them over my shoulder, and walk about a mile through the woods to get to my favorite spot (I no longer have a boat so all my fishing is done from shore).

And finally I get to the relevant part.....Six, mono line is no longer cutting it for me for the all around perfect setup. I have read, read, read, scoured, read, scoured, then read some more about line. None of that reading helped. The Internet is filled with opinions and rants (much like this one) of other people that may or may not have actually done anything that they have an opinion about. The ou way to know for sure is to test your gear yourself. So, I went out and bought a spool of every line I could get locally to re-spool every couple days. Fireline, Spiderwire, 832, Stren/Berkly/Suffix/Seaguar Fluro, P-line...if it was hanging on the shelf at Gander or Cabela's I probably bought it.

I stopped fishing right around when Spiderwire was just coming out. I used it a little and wasn't real fond of it so I always stuck with mono.

Braid has changed a lot in the last decade. 832 and Power Pro have stayed on my spinning setups with 12lb Seaguar Fluro leaders and Fluro backer on the spool (I had a lot of line left over).

100% Fluro has stayed on all my baitcasters (except for two which have 30lb braid and 14lb Fluro leaders for ripping frogs through a pond that is 95% lily pads, 5% actual water). I haven't really felt a huge difference in the Fluro lines unless you step up from 10 to 14lb test.

Sorry for the long winded response. I figured I would give a little background and how it applies to line. Since I've dialed in MY line setup I'm back to smashing fish on worms (normally weightless Senkos), and back to fishing worms 90% of the time.

I fish super clear to almost mud and feel I'm covered no matter what with the Braid/Fluro or straight Fluro in every clarity or cover.

But that's just me!

Hope it helps out.

Welcome back! I've only been back on the water for a few years and remember going trough the same thing. (Maybe not quite as extensive) it's crazy how much things have evolved. Look no further than comparing those $80 Gander Mt. Rods to anything you had 15 years ago.

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Thank you!

The Elite rods are pretty nice. When I fished a lot of tournaments I used St. Croix and Fenwick rods back in the day and they were nice but these newer rods pick up everything.

I bought two of the 13 *** rods (with the same blanks as the Elite's) and the only difference I feel is the tip weight. They feel the same (when a fish hits a worm anyway) sensitivity wise. So, I put the Elites on pretty much every reel I own for a third of the cost haha. It's definitely more than enough for the fishing I do now days!

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