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Fish4bigfish

Stitching big worms

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So I've was about this stitching technique? I don't understand? I am a young big bass guy. I am always fishing for size and have no interest in "tournament" style bass fishing. I have caught 29 fish this year over 24 inches. I don't own a scale I just measure and release. I would appreciate any info on fishing 12 inch plus worms. Stitching? Line, hook etc. My spots are as deep as 30 feet and visibility is around 15 feet. I am using a dobyns 734 with a 1/2 oz tungsten and 16 lb sniper. 

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I don't have the patience to do this at all.  I think A-Jay did this for awhile last year trying to catch some big ones.  I am sure he will chime in and give some tips.

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I can't deny the effectiveness of fishing slow in the summer, but it always pains me to do so, even if I am catching some doing it. Probably my biggest weakness, it's hard for me to slow down. 

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Stitching is a very slow presentation identified as an effective technique for hooking Big Bass by Bill Murphy in his book "In pursuit of Giant Bass". I wouldn't want to deny him any sales opportunity by revealing his highly effective method, but I can say that stitching involves taking the line between your thumb and forefingers and the folding into your palm. See his book for the rest of the story...highly recommended read!  

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It's in the mail lol the seller on eBay shares his last name?

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1 hour ago, Fish4bigfish said:

It's in the mail lol the seller on eBay shares his last name?

Bill Murphy passed away back in 2004. I believe the seller may be his wife. When I purchased a copy through Amazon I was pretty sure his wife was the seller.

I use that type of technique with 10" and 12" worms here in Maryland. It is very effective on pressured bass in my opinion. I reserve it for my A spots that have that perfect combination of structure and deep water in close proximity because you need to commit to that one spot for an extended period of time.

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2 hours ago, kylek said:

I don't have the patience to do this at all.  I think A-Jay did this for awhile last year trying to catch some big ones.  I am sure he will chime in

I did. 

A couple of seasons ago I made a commitment to Learn it & did my best to apply it.  Even posted a thread on it.  However, it  never really came together for me.  I'm definitely NOT in any way, refuting the effectiveness of the technique.   Clearly Mr. Murphy's results speak for themselves & proved beyond a shadow of a doubt his skill & experience stitching was truly at an Elite level.  Just that for whatever reason (probably my lack of patience & / or these waters matted weed bottoms) I had very little in the way of success doing it. 

A-Jay

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Found A-Jay's old thread:

About a year ago I stumbled onto it and lost much of an afternoon reading through it.

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I was in the same bass club with Bill Murphy and stitching worms technique was a offshoot of fishing live crawdads nose hooked. You can't be in a hurry and must be very stationary and that requires anchoring a boat or fishing from shore. Never had the patience to sit and stitch worms hour on end. I adopted the slip shot technique, a modification of split shotting and works very good using big worms.

Tom

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What made Bill Murphy successful was not "stitching" but where he applied this technique!

To me Buck Perry & Bill Murphy's books were not just about lures & techniques but about where to find bass...structure fishing 101.

The major misconception is you "search" for bass with lures!

You "search" for bass with your electronics & catch bass with your lures.

Pro Anglers have spun that truth around in order to sell lures; the DO NOT search for bass with lures! The find structure with their electronics which hold bass & bait.

That was this mornings sermon let's move on!

I do the same thing as stitching except with my reel by turning the reel handle 1/4-1/2 a turn or slowly moving my rod tip, pausing to shake my worm in place. It may take me 5-15 minutes to work a Texas Rig all the way back to the boat.

I use this technique with big jigs as well ;)

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4 hours ago, Catt said:

I do the same thing as stitching except with my reel by turning the reel handle 1/4-1/2 a turn or slowly moving my rod tip, pausing to shake my worm in place. It may take me 5-15 minutes to work a Texas Rig all the way back to the boat.

I use this technique with big jigs as well ;)

This is one of my favorite techniques for fishing football jigs with round-rubber skirts. Just inching it along with the reel. It's especially effective in late fall when the water is in the 50's. 

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Bill Murphy's book title explains the content, In Pursuit of Giant Bass. 

To consistantly catch big bass you should know thier behavior, why they locate where thet do and Bill shared his knowledge in this book, something he never did for decades.

Stitching the San Diego technique uses a fly line retreive method where the line is retrieved using your fingers, the retrieved line dropping into a bucket of water to prevent it from getting tangled between wind a few yards back onto the reel. The pace you stitch can be very slow or fairly quick depending on basses mood, cover, structure or depth. Nothing is more sensitive then your finger tips, you feel everything. When you detect a strike you drop the line and watch it move off while you pick up slack and set the hook. The bass doesn't spit out a big worm with a light split shot, so you have a few seconds to react to the pick up. It exactly like fishing live crawdads.

The popular worm during Bill's era was a 10" Delong Otay special; a chocolate brown back with black blood line and translucent brown belly, plus local hand pours of various natural color tones.

It's a saturation presentation so you can't be in a hurry or waste time where the bass are not located. 

Tom

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3 hours ago, WRB said:

It's a saturation presentation

Tom

#1 it's a saturation presentation!

I see guys pull up on big bass structure, make 4 or 5 quick cast & they are gone!

Minimum output for maximum intake!

Big bass will put out the minimum amount of energy for the maximum amount of food!

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