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Bassin' Brad

Will braid mess up my pole?

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So I spooled one of my heavier rods the other day with 50# power pro braid for frogs, jigs and bigger Texas rigged worms. (A lot of you guys have been saying you like braid for a variety of things.) I haven't fished with it yet but I think I'm going to like it. I've been pitching it in the yard quite a bit. But I've heard some guys say that braid can eat through the eyes of your pole, is that a real problem I should worry about?? Also I didn't put a different type of line for a backing or put tape on the reel before I spooled it, is it very likely that it will slip?? If it is will putting tape the reel before spooling keep that from happening or should I put a different type of line for a backing?? 

 

Brad

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Put mono on first so you dont have to fill the entire spool with braid. And your rod guides will be fine with braided lined. 

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When Superline (kitestring) first appeared on the fishing scene, some braided lines contained Kevlar,

which is an abrasive material that erodes guide inserts. For several years, Kevlar gave all superlines

a bad name, but that wives-tale has finally been laid to rest. Today we know that

even aluminum-oxide guides are not grooved by gelspun polyethylene braid.

 

To save a couple bucks, you can back-up your braided line with mono backing,

which also provides the welcome cushion. However, if you'd prefer to have a knot-free mainline

(who wouldn't?) simply wrap some electrical tape around the spool arbor first,

then fill your spool entirely with your braid of choice, which will serve you for years ~ ~

In my unprejudiced experience (I used monofilament line from the early 1950s to year 2005),

braided line doesn't cause problems, braided line solves problems.

 

Roger

 

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I have never seen a ceramic guide ring grooved, but I've seen a significant number of tiptops grooved.  Which is why I always use SIC tiptops.  Exc for possibly the Torzite, SIC is the hardest ring material.

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I agree with what others here have said - I've never had an issue with braided line and ceramic guides.  I also use mono for backing on all of my braided line. It's less expensive and you don't have to worry about it slipping.  But, if I do have all braid on a reel, I always tape it. That's just the way I was taught years ago, so that's what I do.  So, I have no experience with the line slipping, but I am sure it could be an issue if it happens.  You could always peel the line off and put tape on it and put it all back on, if you find out it's a problem.

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To answer the second part of OP's question, YES you should do something to prevent the load of braid on your reel spool from slipping.  I tie a few yards of mono to mine before spooling the braid.  That always works.  I haven't tried just taping the braid to the spool.  If it dries out and releases, you're back to square one.

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Here's the proper way to spool braid onto your reel. It should alleviate any issues of slippage.

 

 

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If the spool has holes in it you could just tie off to the holes in the spool, if you'd prefer to have a knot-free mainline (who wouldn't?). The only slippage that can happen is if you don't spool the braid with any tension, which isn't slippage its just pulling the slack out. Otherwise the only way it can slip is if your knot comes apart or if it rips the spool apart. Of course you would have to have a fish strong enough to completely spool the reel of line and then rip out the tied portion of the spool. I highly doubt any LG or SM bass is going to do that. 

 

There are the other options like a mono backing that work as well but do ad at least one more knot to the line. Or use tape that I have never tried but seems like others have success with. 

 

As for the guides I wouldn't be concerned most rods made in the past 10 years or so generally can handle lines made today. Also as said braid is not even near as abrasive as it was many years ago so even a old rod with cheap guides could probably live with today's modern braid for quite some time. 

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