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Is it really that important in pitching and flipping?  7 out of ten times it's hit on the fall. Just wondering trying to get differing opinions. Let's keep it clean fellas

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Yeah, I like a sensitive rod for pitching and flipping, but I also want one that I'm not afraid to rear back on and really yank. I find that detecting bites isn't really a problem with most rods for me, YMMV.

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My flipping stick is a Dobyns savvy 766. Most refer to it as a dead stick, but it just got me curious about this topic

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13 minutes ago, kingmotorboat said:

My flipping stick is a Dobyns savvy 766. Most refer to it as a dead stick, but it just got me curious about this topic

I think a lot of guys have this irrational fear of not detecting bites. To each his own. 

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Just now, reason said:

I think a lot of guys have this irrational fear of not detecting bites. To each his own. 

I can agree with that. It's always a worry

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27 minutes ago, kingmotorboat said:

Is it really that important in pitching and flipping?  7 out of ten times it's hit on the fall. Just wondering trying to get differing opinions. Let's keep it clean fellas

 

It's for the 3 times they don't hit it on the fall 😉

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19 minutes ago, Catt said:

 

It's for the 3 times they don't hit it on the fall 😉

This is true. But on that note I'm a line watcher for the most part

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Then why worry?

 

Funny how guys were catching bass before all the tech and high dollar rods. 

 

If you like the Savvy then keep it. Or step up to the a higher end rod. My jig rod is a Genesis 2. I really like it. Use to use a Steez 7'1"H. Hated it, but others love it. To each his own. 

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41 minutes ago, reason said:

Yeah, I like a sensitive rod for pitching and flipping, but I also want one that I'm not afraid to rear back on and really yank. I find that detecting bites isn't really a problem with most rods for me, YMMV.

Just playing devil's advocate, how would you know what you're unable to detect?

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34 minutes ago, reason said:

I think a lot of guys have this irrational fear of not detecting bites. To each his own. 

Guilty as charged:)  But, I get so few bites anyway, I really like to feel the ones that get away.:D

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2 minutes ago, Bent said:

Just playing devil's advocate, how would you know what you're unable to detect?

I don't know with certainty of course, anything could be happening under the surface, but holding a rod in my hand for over 40 years, and filling coolers with fish that I know are much lighter biters than LMBs under conditions that most recreational anglers would consider unfishable just gives me a degree of confidence that it might be the case.

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1 hour ago, Finnz922 said:

Then why worry?

 

Funny how guys were catching bass before all the tech and high dollar rods. 

 

If you like the Savvy then keep it. Or step up to the a higher end rod. My jig rod is a Genesis 2. I really like it. Use to use a Steez 7'1"H. Hated it, but others love it. To each his own. 

Not so much a worry good sir, just trying to pick others brains on everything

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2 hours ago, kingmotorboat said:

This is true. But on that note I'm a line watcher for the most part

 

Night time will cure that 😉

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2 hours ago, reason said:

I don't know with certainty of course, anything could be happening under the surface, but holding a rod in my hand for over 40 years, and filling coolers with fish that I know are much lighter biters than LMBs under conditions that most recreational anglers would consider unfishable just gives me a degree of confidence that it might be the case.

Good answer!  I haven't been fishing long enough to have that sort of confidence, someday I'll get there hopefully.

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While I really like state of the art light weight rods available today and they are pleasure to use no rod is sensitive as your finger tips.

My old 25-30 year old graphite rods are just as sensitive as today’s rods, they are a little heavier.

Tom

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@kingmotorboat being a line watcher is great but in my opinion ya should have felt the bite before the line moved!

 

I'm quite sure @WRB will agree the bites where the line moves or ya got taps/bumps are easy it's the one where it's almost a sixth sense.

 

Sensitivity in your line & rod is important but ultimately it's in your hands & brain. 

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I opted for a dobyns champion 765 for my flipping/pitching rod. I wanted the extra sensitivity it adds. I dont think it ever hurts to have more sensitivity.  I also use it to swim lures and work on bottom in places, as well as a carolina rod. 

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3 hours ago, Catt said:

@kingmotorboat being a line watcher is great but in my opinion ya should have felt the bite before the line moved!

 

I'm quite sure @WRB will agree the bites where the line moves or ya got taps/bumps are easy it's the one where it's almost a sixth sense.

 

Sensitivity in your line & rod is important but ultimately it's in your hands & brain. 

^^^this^^^

Tom

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I have always thought that detecting bites is probably 85% in your hands and brain, and 15% in the gear you use. Sure some gear may send feedback on bites in more obvious or noticeable ways than others, but from my experience if you are used to how to read your less sensitive rod, you're probably going to retrain yourself moving to a more sensitive rod, and the benefit may or may not actually be worth it at the end of the day.

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14 hours ago, WRB said:

While I really like state of the art light weight rods available today and they are pleasure to use no rod is sensitive as your finger tips.

My old 25-30 year old graphite rods are just as sensitive as today’s rods, they are a little heavier.

Tom

 

Given I'm seldom rewarded with great catches,  I make up for a lack of skill by enjoying the craftsmanship and design of fine equipment.:P

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