Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Just retired and know nothing about bass fishing. I have been to Bass Pro and purchased a new Bait Casting Combo plus a Spinning Outfit combo. Silly question to all you bass fishermen but what bait should I start with and also what is a fluke.

 

Thanks,

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum!

 

To get started I always recommend people try a soft plastic stick bait (something like a Senko, or a Yum Dinger). Its a really nice technique to pick up early on because it is an excellent fish catcher and a relatively simple technique. There are plenty of videos on this technique on youtube. Essentially though you just select your rigging method, wacky or texas rig, the toss the bait out, let it sink on slack line, and once it has stopped falling pull it back up and let it fall on slack line again. Often with this style of fishing the bites come when the bait is falling so stay alert and watch your line!

 

A few other baits I'd recommend would be a spinnerbait and some shallow crank baits (square bills or lipless cranks) these baits can both be fished with a steady retrieve and catch fish, however you can do a variety of things with them once you feel more comfortable. 

 

A fluke is essentially a soft jerk bait, I fish them with a hard twitching motion and pause for a few seconds and feel for a bite. Most of my fluke bites have come during that pause, so be ready.

 

Hope that helps, fishing is a blast I'm glad you've decided to pick it up

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would tell you the exact same thing as Graham.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to BR.

For starters do you fish for others species?

Please add what rods, reels and line types and size your have?

Eastern Canada probably means the bass are smallmouth.

Tom

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome to the forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and Welcome to Bass Resource ~ 

Enjoy your retirement.

A-Jay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fluke1
flo͞ok/
noun
noun: fluke; plural noun: flukes
  1. unlikely chance occurrence, especially a surprising piece of luck.
    "their triumph was no fluke"
    synonyms: chance, coincidence, accident, twist of fate; More
    piece of luck, stroke of good luck/fortune, serendipity
    "what a nice fluke, finding you here"
 
 

 

.....in other words, whenever I catch a fish :hammerblows:

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Smokinal said:
fluke1
flo͞ok/
noun
noun: fluke; plural noun: flukes
  1. unlikely chance occurrence, especially a surprising piece of luck.
    "their triumph was no fluke"
    synonyms: chance, coincidence, accident, twist of fate; More
    piece of luck, stroke of good luck/fortune, serendipity
    "what a nice fluke, finding you here"
 
 

 

.....in other words, whenever I catch a fish :hammerblows:

 

 

fluke1
flo͞ok/
noun
noun: fluke; plural noun: flukes
 
2. Common name for summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus.
 
 
.....in other words, go salt water fishing. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 inch soft plastic green pumpkin worm, Texas rigged, 3/0 extra wide gap hook, on whichever combo you can cast with. Use a clinch knot to connect the line to the hook. 10# test mono line is good to start out with (anywhere from 6# to 14# should work). If it's the baitcaster, consider slipping a 1/4 oz bullet weight inline (baitcasters tend to backlash on light lures). If you're fishing in vegetation, poke the hook tip back under the plastic ("weedless" mode) so it doesn't get hung up.

 

For line and lure weight, try to stay within the rod's ratings, ideally in the middle of them.

 

Medium power rods with fast action are a good place to start for general purpose bass fishing, but there are plenty other choices that work too.

 

Cast out, let it sink but keep the line mostly tight (sounds counterintuitive but you'll get it). When it's near or at the bottom, start swimming it back with whatever method you think makes the worm look most realistic. I like to jerk the rod tip up to bring up the worm, then fall back down slowly while reeling in the worm slowly, then repeat. This way you cover both horizontal distance and vertical/water column. Work the worm the entire time; don't just let it sit there.

 

In short, just imagine what the worm is doing or what you want it to do, and use your rod and reel to make that happen.

 

Fish like structure, cover, weeds, any kind of disruption from plain/open water. Fish near those areas (not necessarily IN them, to avoid snags when starting out). Starting out, open/deep water probably won't bring you as many bass as shallower water or close to shore & structure.

 

Handle the fish as little as possible and release it as soon as possible. You can learn tons from youtube, or better yet, a fishing buddy.

 

Keep it simple and fun. 4 inch work, TX rigged (or wacky rigged, even easier) is almost universal.

 

I'm a noob, just started last fall. Did the same as you: bought a baitcaster and a spinner. Got my first fish, in 17 minutes, on the baitcaster, using aforementioned T rigged 4" green pumpkin worm with a 1/4 oz bullet weight, ~50 feet from shore in ~15 ft of water. I had no idea what I was doing. Still don't. SO MUCH FUN!

 

Welcome to the forum & fishing.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome

You didn’t mention whether you’ll be fishing from a boat or off the bank. I assume the latter as you mentioned that you’re just getting into bass fishing. 

I suggest keeping it simple to start with. A couple of moving style baits (cranks and spinnerbaits) for the baitcast combo and some plastic worms fished on a split shot rig and maybe a Ned rig for the spinning outfit. 

The other thing........Visit here often,use the search feature and don’t be afraid to ask questions. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are thousands and thousands of baits made out there. However I will always suggest to start with some simple baits to cover the water from top to bottom. Many good ones have already been mentioned.  I like some simple baits you can fish on your spinning rod. These will be lighter in weight, which is what a spinning rod handles well. I include small texas rigged worms, or small worms rigged on a stand up style jighead ( we call them shakeyhead jigs).

rs.php?path=MSPROMD-BRN-1.jpg&nw=150Finesse WormZâ¢

The simple 5 inch grub like a Kalin Lunker grub is a deadly weapon because it can cover shallow, mid or deep water depending on what weight you use. Many anglers rig them with a 1/8 or so worm weight and a small worm hook.  I prefer to use a Bass Pro Shops Perfect Finesse worm jighead. I use these on many baits as they rig easily and allow my to change the style bait from a grub to a worm to a creature bait.

image.png.63b5b07a9aaf4c4ac4f0e2d07e2b548d.pngrs.php?path=KSLG-410-1.jpg

The Senco worm is a great weapon too. It is so versatile. It can be rigged texas style, "wacky" style with either a small hook or a small jighead in the middle and even as a bait on a drop shot rig.

For your baitcaster baits like a 3/8 to 1/2 ounce jig with a plastic trailer such as a grub, crayfish imitation, etc can cover the bottom well. Baits like Rapala floating diving minnow shaped baits have been used forever and still catch fish.  The last bait I will cover, since you asked about them, is what is a fluke. It has been answered as a plastic jerkbait, and that is true. The original has a forked tail.

rs.php?path=ZMF-350-1.jpgThey are great baits but I prefer a paddle tail version of a plastic jerkbait called Skinny Dipper.  It is made by a company called Reaction Innovation and they make the bait in 3 sizes. One is about 4 inches called a Little Dipper, the Skinny Dipper is about 5 inches, and then there is a Big Dipper. I fish the middle size most often.  The bait has a great swimming action when retrieved and an irresistible flutter like a dying fish when paused.  I rig them with a special belly weighted hook when I want to stay in less than 10 feet and another type jighead that looks like a fish's head when I want to fish deep.

 

rs.php?path=RISKD-HD-1.jpg

 

 rs.php?path=DJMASWH-BSH-1.jpg&nw=150image.png.54bacde02a4f29c685a7ca5e55fd3632.png

I hope that gives you some eye candy to help you understand what we are talking about when you read all this confusing information. 

I recommend you go make a small order that would include several baits and the correct tackle that will let you fish those baits in several different ways. Go fish them!  Then pick a couple more baits and their matching tackle. Fish them and so on. I would rather start with say 2 packs of "Bluegill" Lunker grubs and 2 packs of  "Smoke Salt sand Pepper" and some BPS Perfect Finesse Worm Jig heads than 20 packs, if you understand what I mean.  That and several color packs of Sencos along with some hooks and wacky jigheads might be a good start for those baits. Colors always depend on the water clarity. Clear water then go with lighter colors  dark stained water darker colors.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Omg. Thanks so much for the information, what a swell bunch. Just looked at the rods and baitcaster is med heavy and spinner is a ugly stick med fast. With my old mitchel reel. I have a 12 ft zodiac and a 55lb thrust. I purchased a fish finder. I purchased some plastic baits and spinner baits. The guy at bass pro put a 20 lb braid line on the spinner and a 20 lb mono on the baitcaster. Species in the lake I’ve been told are bass, splake,pike, trout and a few others now to try to catch a fish. Again thanks so much for all the info. Now to look at a few of the posted videos. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum.  I like the above posts.  A worm and spinnerbait are two favorite lures.  I don't use 20# mono in my area, but I don't have the huge toothy creatures you have up there.....outside of an occasional Musky, but catching one accidentally is a rare thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a word of warning, it can get overwhelming fast. I recommend focusing on one or two techniques at a time. Watch lots of YouTube videos on those techniques and take it slow. There is so much to learn it can be alot at first. It's fun and we all love it. Good luck to you and welcome to the forums. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome aboard!

 

I'd start you with, IMHO, the simplest setup, the

wacky rig. Nearly every beginner I've helped has

had great success with it.

 

Buy some Gamakatsu Finesse Wide Gap hooks in

size 1 or 1/0 (a little thicker and larger) and then

some BPS Stick-O worms (or Senkos) in 4 1/4" or

5" (I personally have more success with the shorter).

 

I'd recommend Watermelon Magic, Junebug, Green

Pumpkin black flake, and Green pumpkin/Orange

laminate (suggestions).

 

Once you have the hook tied on your line, bend the 

worm in half and slide it on to the hook perpendicular

to the hook.

 

Cast it out and be patient, let it fall. It will shimmy 

and shake and bass, if they're there, will normally

hit it on the fall. If nothing, lift your rod, reel in a bit

and let it fall again...rinse and repeat.

 

Simple, effective, and a start. As others have shown,

there are *MANY* ways to fish for bass. Start simple.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, new2BC4bass said:

Welcome to the forum.  I like the above posts.  A worm and spinnerbait are two favorite lures.  I don't use 20# mono in my area, but I don't have the huge toothy creatures you have up there.....outside of an occasional Musky, but catching one accidentally is a rare thing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. Been back to Bass Pro and purchased some Fluorocarbon 8 lb line I will use for some leader line on my 20 lb braid. I have looked at a lot of knot tieing. With my vision as a senior, the only knot I can close to tieing is the surgeon. Perhaps I will get some thicker leader line. 👀

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Senior, go on every bass fishing site you can find and read, read, read.  Concurrently,  study the countless UTube bass fishing videos before you even venture onto the water.  There are many videos by bass pros which will set you straight.  What you will find is numerous versions of how to fish every technique, but after doing the foregoing you will be able to sort out what is the best way for you.  Every bass site will have a ton of bad information by alleged experts who like to run up their number of posts on the site.  The videos by bass pros will help you discount the bad advice. Sorry to sound cynical, but I went through this 20 years ago when I retired and I read an article by a bass pro who offered this advice.  It will really cut down on the learning curve and frustration.  My dear wife also bought me a bass fishing book series on various techniques, which is no longer in print unfortunately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that great advice. My wife has already advised me that I have gone over my budget for my new found sport. 🙄

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you have a bait casting MH fast rod and reel, unknown brands with 20 lb mono and a spinning outfit Ugly stick medium fast with vintage Mitchell (300?) spinning reel and 20 lb braid. You plan to use lb FC leader.

Do you have any fishing experience? 

Learning to cast a baitcasting reel with 20 lb mono may be a challenge, let us know how that goes.

Using FC leaders on spinning reels with braid is popular, but questionable considering FC  is difficult to tie reliable knots with and you must tie 2 knots; leader and lure. You could use a mono leader, easier to tie knots, or no leader.

Spinnerbaits are flashy attract the toothy fish like pike and musky, be aware.

If you try to do too many things at once it leads to confusion and so far everyone is being helpful offering a wide variety of suggestions, pick a few to get started.

My guess is the bass are Smallnouth bass not largemouth based on where you are located and the other species being mostly colder water fish. Therefore I would study smallmouth bass lures and presentations, there is a smallmouth bass forum for example. Smallmouth tend to roam around in small groups and prefer smaller crawdads and smaller baitfish then largemouth. Most bass anglers and articles tend to focus suggestions for largemouth like fishing heavy cover that smallmouth avoid.

Just a note, your older Mitchell spinning reels turns the opposite direction of today's spinning reels and spooling line can cause line twist.

Good luck,

Tom

PS, Zodiac inflatable boat you are fishing from a sitting position, similar to the kayak anglers, you may want to read their post regarding techniques. Do you plan to troll lures?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/14/2018 at 7:40 AM, papajoe222 said:

Welcome

You didn’t mention whether you’ll be fishing from a boat or off the bank. I assume the latter as you mentioned that you’re just getting into bass fishing. 

I suggest keeping it simple to start with. A couple of moving style baits (cranks and spinnerbaits) for the baitcast combo and some plastic worms fished on a split shot rig and maybe a Ned rig for the spinning outfit. 

The other thing........Visit here often,use the search feature and don’t be afraid to ask questions. 

 

^^^ Couldn't say it better myself.

 

I would recommend watching the videos on this site for more specific technique instructions. Then of course, get on the water. After a few months, you should be able to begin establishing patterns and locating bass to some extent (I quantify this because even the best of us don't always manage on some days).

 

I can also recommend the tacticalbassin youtube channels as well as they also offer a lot of great information. The guys at tacticalbassin really get into amazing detail, so knowing that, that should tell you which channel to start with.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply. It’s a mitchell avocet iv. It’s a little cheap $25.00  the bait casting was a Bass Pro Mega Cast. Like to find out who makes those. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple things worth mentioning:

 

1) you've probably noticed already that getting started can be information overload, but keep in mind: one rod and one reel with a proven lure will catch bass. 

 

2) "keep it simple when starting out" may sound like dumbing it down for a newbie but it's not. The simple techniques are just as effective for experienced anglers as they are for newbies. If I had to fish only one rod, one reel and one lure for the rest of my life, I'd go right back to the simple setup I started with.

 

3) There's nothing more rewarding than figuring it out for yourself. Except that moment when you feel a tug on the line.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, my brother in Michigan is still fishing for walleyes with a 25 yr old Mitchell spinning reel on a rod he paid $20 for back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×