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I plan to go on s fishing trip in Northern Missouri on Friday it is suppose to be a high 61, but it is suppose to be 31 the night before so you think the bass will be active enough to bite 

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they may be a little slow to bite early on but should start to come around later in the day. that’s my 2 cents. welcome to BR man 

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Water temperature doesn't change over night unless cold rain and high winds mix it.

What you are asking is will a cold front affect my chances of catching bass, yes it will.

Tom

 

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If that has been the norm for a few days prior, I would expect the fishing to be decent. If, however, thr days prior to Fri. have been 'normal' and this is a downturn in night time temps, you'll be working for the scattered bites you may get. The entire mid-west has been experiencing a much colder than normal April (had snow here the last few mornings).

Water temps aren't where they would be and the bass have been reluctant to move up, let alone search out bedding sites.  Stick to a pre-spawn approach with that cold front in mind, but don't forget to check out the shallows in the late afternoon. :confused4:

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Yes the fish are biting in northern Missouri right now. Actually getting into their prespawn patterns and some of the biggest fish of the year will be caught in the next few weeks in that area. 

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Temperature swings day to night of 30 degrees is the norm in most of California year around, it's how our climate works.

This year has been a severe weather cycle across most of the country with storms rolling though weekly. You need to remember it's water temperature that affects bass not air temperature. Air temperature will in time affect water temperatures but not normally over night, severe storms are the exception.

Pre spawn is my favorite seasonal period because the biggest bass in the lake are catchable and locations predictable. The big bass are hunting prey and low light, low pressure with light rain is the ideal combination of factors to catch these active bass.

Severe storms is the one thing that can shut them off. Fish go deeper and/or tighter to cover/structure, slow down and be focused.

Use good good judgement and be safe.

Tom

 

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23 hours ago, BenNorr said:

I plan to go on s fishing trip in Northern Missouri on Friday it is suppose to be a high 61, but it is suppose to be 31 the night before so you think the bass will be active enough to bite 

Where ?

 

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