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The Rooster

Help me to understand differences in line please

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Ok, as I know it there's monofilament, fluorocarbon, copolymer, and braid.......4 different types of line........or are there even more??

Anyway, I've ONLY used mono line until just recently.  Mostly the Berkley Trilene XL or the Stren original.  6 to 12 pound sizes and all in between.  I'm well used to how they work.

Recently I got some fluorocarbon line and have had the opportunity to cast it for a couple of small trips.  Not caught any fish on it yet but I can tell it's more sensitive than the mono I'm used to using and it also sinks compared to mono trying to float.  I'm using the Berkley Transitions in the 12 and 14 pound sizes.  So far I like it but really don't have any experience with it enough to know exactly what to expect.

I've never used braid but I've read that braid is super strong for smaller diameters and it also cuts through weeds and slop better than most, and that it also has a tendency to float like mono does.  Any other advantages or disadvantages??

Copolymer is the one I don't understand at all.  What's the purpose of blending two kinds of materials to make it, and what materials are they??  Is it stronger than mono, smaller diameters??  Clear like fluorocarbon??  What??  

Thanks for any replies in advance.

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Copolymer lines are generally stonger for a given diameter,

stretch less, have somewhat better sensativity and are more

abrasion resistant than comparable monofilaments.

8-)

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Hybrid & Copolymer Lines: Copolymer is a product of copolymerization, which is a chemical reaction in which two or more molecules combine to form a larger molecule that contains repeating structural units, or in other words the combination of two or more monomers to create a copolymer. The outcome of this process results in a material that has many more benefits than a solo substance. The copolymer fishing line becomes more abrasion resistant, have a lower stretch factor, higher tensile strength, higher impact and greater shock resistance, and much more.

Major Categories of Fishing Line

1. Traditional monofilament lines

2. New super braided lines

3. Hybrid & Copolymer lines

4. Fluorocarbon lines

5. Leaders

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Copolymer lines are generally stonger for a given diameter,

stretch less, have somewhat better sensativity and are more

abrasion resistant than comparable monofilaments.

8-)

Do they tend to float like mono does or sink like fluorocarbon??  Are they clear in water like fluorocarbon is or do they come in different colors like monos do??

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Copolymers float, but has no impact whats-so-ever on

any technique or presentation. All of the brands tend to

blend well with water and many, especially in smaller

diameters, are virtually invisible. Perfect examples are

P-Line CXX, Gamma and Yo-Zuri Hybrid (original formula).

8-)

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Despite popular beliefs there are only two Super Braids DSM's Dyneema® & Honeywell's Spectra® & despite popular beliefs Super Braids do stretch but only as little as 5%. Different line manufactures use these fibers to produce their specific lines by either the way they braid the fibers or adding coatings.

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Mono - great all around line.  "Floats" for topwater presentations, comes in different varieties from limp to strong (XL vs. XT or Big Game).  Stretches more than most other types of line.

Flouro - same refractive index as water so it "appears" invisible underwater, sinks, abrasion resistant.  Should be more sensitive than mono.  But, not as manageable as mono.  People also say it stretches less, but Tackletour's testing showed this to be not necessarily true.

Copoly - attempts to get the best out of both mono and flouro while removing many of the disadvantages.  

Briad - strong for the same diameter, can use smaller diameters to cut through vegetation while maintaining high strength, not very abrasion resistant, some issues with "shock" strength (can snap the line on hooksets), very limp, "floats".

Just my high level observations/opinions.  Feel free to discredit them.   :)

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Mono - great all around line. "Floats" for topwater presentations, comes in different varieties from limp to strong (XL vs. XT or Big Game). Stretches more than most other types of line.

Flouro - same refractive index as water so it "appears" invisible underwater, sinks, abrasion resistant. Should be more sensitive than mono. But, not as manageable as mono. People also say it stretches less, but Tackletour's testing showed this to be not necessarily true.

Copoly - attempts to get the best out of both mono and flouro while removing many of the disadvantages.

Briad - strong for the same diameter, can use smaller diameters to cut through vegetation while maintaining high strength, not very abrasion resistant, some issues with "shock" strength (can snap the line on hooksets), very limp, "floats".

Just my high level observations/opinions. Feel free to discredit them. :)

I'll buy your observations.

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And I also have to say that I read fluorocarbon doesn't stretch as much but as far as I could tell it stretches nearly the same as my Trilene XL in the same pound test line.

Thanks to all for the information on copolymers. That's probably the next line I'll try since it has more abrasion resistance and lower stretch, and also somewhat more sensitivity but will still be similar to mono in action. Micro suggested some Yo-zuri Hybrid in another thread so that's probably the one I'll go for.

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would this be a step in the right direction over my Trilene XT, XL & Maxx?

I don't really know because we have a lot of great sticks on

this forum that fish Trilene XL, XT and Big Game. What I like

about the copolymers is better line mangement and lower visibility.

8-)

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And I also have to say that I read fluorocarbon doesn't stretch as much but as far as I could tell it stretches nearly the same as my Trilene XL in the same pound test line.

As I mentioned earlier, tackletour did a wide variety of tests on various flouros. Read their results here:

http://www.tackletour.com/reviewfluorocarbontest.html

and

http://www.tackletour.com/reviewfluorocarbon2.html

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 If you're going with copoly, try the Yo-Zuri ultrasoft. I used original Stren for more than 25 years before changing (actually still like it). Ultrasoft is a little more manageable than the hybrid,IMHO. The only drawback to it is the only place I've found to buy it is Cabela's. Another IMPO, which ever one you try get yourself a bottle KVD line conditioner. It really works :)...

skillet

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Been meaning to get some KVD too.  Man this site is great to keep you informed on the stuff to have.  Wish I'd found it years ago.  

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would this be a step in the right direction over my Trilene XT, XL & Maxx?

No, lines are tools, you choose what does a better job for the conditions and what you find to like best or suits your needs best, most of my fishing is done with nylon, but that doesn 't mean that I limit my universe of lines to just nylon, from the nylons my personal favorite is Trilene Big Game, I like it 's properties ( stretch, abrassion resistance, handling, memory ), then comes XL ( like the way it handles but I know that it may not be the best for high abrassion environments ), at the bottom of my favorite ylon lines comes XT ( very good for high abrassion environments but handles like crap ).

I do fish with fluorocarbon, it stretches as much as highly abrassion resistant nylon, handles pretty much like it, better vibration transmitting properties than nylon, not the material I like the most for main line but it does have a place, the only drawback it has for me is that I can 't see the line against the background.

Copoly, oh boy talk about strong, gotta understand that copoly is not like pure nylon or pure fluoro, you don 't "need" to go heavy in the lb test to do what heavy fluoro or heavy nylon do, some copoly are so strong that in the lower lb test ( 6-8 lb ) they do the job of thicker lines. Ging thin on copoly eliminates most of the undesirable handling properties heavier line has.

Braided, oh yeah I do have some reels spooled with braided, there are times I need it even though it 's not my everyday line. Bradided doesn 't do well everywhere specially if you are fishing chunk rock.

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Rooster: Copolymer is the one I don't understand at all.  What's the purpose of blending two kinds of materials to make it, and what materials are they??  Is it stronger than mono, smaller diameters??  Clear like fluorocarbon??  What??  

I was wondering what the difference is too, thanks for asking this!  :)

PS.

You and I probably have the most ????. don't you think?   :)

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get yourself a bottle KVD line conditioner. It really works :)...

skillet

How do you apply it???

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Copolymer lines tend to be stronger for any given diameter because

he two nylon fomulas bond into a stronger line than either would be

seperately. Epoxy glue might be easier to visualize: the components

must be mixed together to form the adhesive.

8-)

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 I use the KVD line conditioner when I respool with new line. Wind some line on and spray a little on line already reeled on. Reel some more and spray a little more. Do this maybe 3 times until reel is full. Night before fishing, I'll spray line pretty good. That way it dries really well before using  :)...

skillet

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I try and keep things SIMPLE, I seem to catch more fish that way.  I use braid 99% of the time and powerpro works fine for me.  I prefer the hookset and lure action with braid.  The only time I use mono or copolymer is on a drift boat because tangles with other fisherman are nightmares and the crew will be giving you the evil eye all day.

Soak your copolymer or mono in hot tap water for a bit before spooling and your line will spool up without any coils and lay better especially in the heavier test lines.

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