Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Other.

Rod Dilemma

Recommended Posts

When it comes to buying fishing gear it is pretty simple. I know what lures&colors produce on my lake and the ones that don't. Yet there is one thing that frustrates me every time I just think about it. FISHING RODS. Since I don't have a boat I'm forced to fish off the harsh banks. This only allows me to carry 2-3 rods. Anymore and it just starts to get difficult. The biggest problem is that there are so many choices and different styles to choose from it is enough to make you want to bang your head on your desk. They have specific rods for Crankin', drop shotting, flipping/pitching, froggin', swimbaits, plastics, etc. Feel free to add on to the list if you want...

I can't carry 5 different rods on the bank with me, I just can't. Not to mention the price of rods. You can expect yourself paying $150+ for a good quality rod. Buy the rods you need and you have enough for a jon boat.

It's really to bad they don't make an "all-in-one" Do any low-budget bank fisherman feel the same way? Or hopefully give me some pointers in what you do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a while I was carrying 5-7 rods while shore fishing, and walking around 50 acre lakes. It gets tiring, I agree, so I found a few rods to help me accomplish quite a few tasks.

Dobyns 733 - T-Rig Plastics, Senkos, Drop Shot, Shaky Head, you can even use it cranking.

Dobyns 765 - Flipping / Pitching / Smaller Swimbaits

Then depending on the time of year and what I was focusing on, sometimes I would take a 702 spinning rod to have some fun, or take a 734 for spinnerbaits, more plastics, and lighter flipping in pitching with jigs and such.

Good Medium action rod, Good Medium Heavy action rod, and a good Heavy or XHeavy rod. Lengths are up to you, I like 7'3 and 7'6.

hope that helps a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to bank fish with one rod. When I got older I took 2 and had a belt with a rod holder on it so I didn't have to lay the other one on the ground.

The key is to look at the day's conditions and bring the right rod- which is the one that covers the 2-4 techniques you expect to need. Most often I used a 6'6" or 7' MH fast. I could use it for t-rigs, c-rigs, flukes, buzz & spinnerbaits, and more.

If you don't mind retying lures, then it's easy to find rods that will fish well with many different lures.

Best advice, don't over think it.  Keep tackle simple also...  if you take more than a fanny pack or small backpack, it's probably too much.  In a boat, it's a whole different story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They make technique specific rods so anglers will buy more rods.  Even though a Carolina Rig rod may be perfect for that application it doesn't mean your worm and jig rod or flipping stick won't work for Carolina rigs if you generally do more t-rigging.  If  I was limited to 3 rods I would buy:

1)7' M, mod fast action for cranks and treble hook lures.  If your not going to fish a lot of crankbaits you won't need this rod.

2)7' Mh X-fast for jigs, t'rigs, c-rigs, frogs and heavy spinnerbaits

3) 7' M fast for weightless plastics, light texas rigs and spinners.  This rod can double in a pinch as your crankbait rod if you don't think there is need for a treble hook specific rod.

Rod number 2 needs to be rated to accommodate at least a 3/4 oz lure, preferably 1oz, and rod number 3 needs to be rated down to 1/4 and up to 5/8oz to maximize your versatility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too am shorebound as you, but I have come to learn that carrying more than 4 rods is not worth it. You will also come to learn that maybe two will be used and the others during your stint might never even be touched.

I think it was RW that recommends that 3 rods can pretty much cover the gamut for most bass fishing. I agree with his assessment, especially for those who are stuck on the bank like us.

All you need to do is figure out which 3-4 presentations are most productive for you on your waters and choose those rods that meet those needs. That is all you have to do.

For example:

Rigs

1) Spinning rig - to handle finesse and lighter things/topwater

2) Casting reel - jigs and soft plastics

3) Casting, cranks and jerkbaits

This is what I would typically carry with me and sometimes a 4th rig. As you can see, there is no flippin' stick. Why?? Because I don't ever face that scenario in my area.

This is also to say that you can't have other rods. I do, but I will usually bring only 3-4 depending on which rigs I think might give me my best chances that particular day.

You are so right about it being a pain carrying 3 let alone 4 rods. I finally did something about that awhile ago. I created what I call a Rod Quiver. With it, I can easily hold 3 rods in hand and with no trouble to boot.

STA72494Large.jpg

Depending on the shape, you can configure one to hold even more rods. I chose a triangle to hold 3 rods. Other shapes like a hexagon or octagon can be used to hold more.

Prop it up on your fishing bag, and your other rods will never touch the ground to ever get dirty or scratched.

STA74074Large.jpg

Here it is in application. I get to hold the 4th rod in the other hand. As I mentioned, depending on the configuration you choose, you can hold more rods. We shorebound folk don't always have to be limited to all in one fo sho'. :D ;D

100_0549Medium.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

islandbass, that is a sweet contraption you've got there. I might have to copy that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
islandbass, that is a sweet contraption you've got there. I might have to copy that.

I agree, that is a nice set-up.

As for your trouble of carrying several rods fishing from shoremy advice would be to only carry 1.  When I can only take one rod, it is my G Loomis MBR783C.  This rod can handle almost every lure there is quite well.  Is it the ideal rod for every application...no, but it can be used comfortably with whatever I am throwing.  In my opinion, it would be a major hassle to take more than 1 rod shore fishing (unless you have a bad @$$ set-up like islandbass).  Simplify your fishing trips and find that one good rod you really enjoy to use that can cover comfortably most of the applications you like to fish.  The is just my humble opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all of the wonderful replies gus :D

I think I might just have to build what islandbass has. Seriously dude, that thing is frigging sweet!  You could make money off that!

I kind of like what Matmm is saying. Pick 3 rods that will be able to handle just about everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm Kayak-bound so I face similar considerations as you.  You've got to have the broadest application from each rod, as well as, line weight and type...  Check out the website for Powell Fishing Rods.  I will probably end up with 3-4 of their rods in the next month or two.  I like the extra length of their rods combined with the Extra-Fast Actions that they use.  They lowered the prices on a lot of their rods (about $30.00) in the last few months.  Look at the 702CEF, 703CEF and 704CEF models or their spinning rod equivalents.

Islandbass, you're a genius!!  Rod transport just got a lot easier. THANKS

Happy Hunting,

Davo  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For bank fisherman, I think the environment at times may dictate the appropriate rods rather than the baits.

For instance, I can park close to my favorite spot, so I may have as many as 5 rods with me, but at most I will bring three close to the bank.  At this spot, most access is around reeds, bushes, trees, tall grass etc.  For that reason I favor spinning setups to prevent nasty backlashes when I catch brush during the cast.  This year I plan to favor my 6'0" & 6'3" rods so that it is easier to cast around the brush.  my 6'6" and 7'0" rods just seem too awkward in tight confines.

On the other hand, in open space the longer rods are helpful to get extra casting distance.  I have one rod/reel setup that allows me to reach a piece of cover that is unavailable to any other combo I have.

I believe that bank fisherman do need less technique specific rods and therefore need to be flexible in how they use them.  When crawling through brush (which I'm often too lazy to do :) ) I will take only one rod.  It is good to know that the rod will handle a wide range of lure weights, such as 1/8 to 1/2 or 1/4 to 3/4 oz.  Thus, you can use most of your tactics.

This year, much of my quarry fishing will be done with 6'3" MXF and 6'0" MHF spinning rods.  However, I also look forward to using my baitcasting setups for jigs - it's just that I won't be able to get to all of the same pieces of cover.

It should be noted that my opinions often change with the direction of the prevailing wind  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I want to say thanks for the compliments and second, the advice given in this thread is spot on.

T-bone, I built mine before I saw them. It would have saved me some time, but at least it was fun to build.  8-)

One neat thing about it I found is that during transport in the car, the quiver also prevents the rods from banging against each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For bank fisherman, I think the environment at times may dictate the appropriate rods rather than the baits.

For instance, I can park close to my favorite spot, so I may have as many as 5 rods with me, but at most I will bring three close to the bank. At this spot, most access is around reeds, bushes, trees, tall grass etc. For that reason I favor spinning setups to prevent nasty backlashes when I catch brush during the cast. This year I plan to favor my 6'0" & 6'3" rods so that it is easier to cast around the brush. my 6'6" and 7'0" rods just seem too awkward in tight confines.

On the other hand, in open space the longer rods are helpful to get extra casting distance. I have one rod/reel setup that allows me to reach a piece of cover that is unavailable to any other combo I have.

I believe that bank fisherman do need less technique specific rods and therefore need to be flexible in how they use them. When crawling through brush (which I'm often too lazy to do :) ) I will take only one rod. It is good to know that the rod will handle a wide range of lure weights, such as 1/8 to 1/2 or 1/4 to 3/4 oz. Thus, you can use most of your tactics.

This year, much of my quarry fishing will be done with 6'3" MXF and 6'0" MHF spinning rods. However, I also look forward to using my baitcasting setups for jigs - it's just that I won't be able to get to all of the same pieces of cover.

It should be noted that my opinions often change with the direction of the prevailing wind :D

Yep.

It's all about the kind enviroment along the banks of your lakes that will dictate your equipment selection.

Buying some 7' long rods is great unless you're dealing with a lot of brush and overhanging trees along the shore.  Then that rod becomes cumbersome and nearly worthless for proper lure presentation.  

Honestly,  I've found that having shorter rods, 6' to 6'6" are your best bet, not only when facing all the conditions you'll experience when fishing along the bank but also moving around the lake which may involve moving through woods to get from one spot the the other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh.....I just stick with one rod and a backpack for my lures when shore fishin.  Lots easier and I can choose among my setups depending upon what I'll be mostly throwing.  Most of the time, I use a Medium rated rod as it handles a wide variety of baits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some ponds, where I'll only bring my heavy cover rod, a 7'6" XH/F flipping stick.  Other places, just my drop shot rod, which I use for most small finesse plastics.  

I think one of my favorite rod to bring on shore trips is my 6' topwater/jerkbait rod.  Its a M/F, kind of short, a little too light, but easy enough to get used to throwing most of what's in my backpack, including spinnerbaits, t-rig, wacky Senkos, in addition to its primary duties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think about the lake I'm going to hit and pick two baits to concentrate on. Those will pick the rods. For example, I often hit a lake that has a lot of lily pads. I'll take one rod for baits to use in the water at the edge of the pads and one to throw frogs right into the middle of it. There's another spot I fish that's a deep channel by a drain pipe. I'll sometimes just take one rod to throw chatterbaits or shallow cranks into. I'll concentrate on specific areas, specific cover, rather than trying to cover the whole lake. It's worked out well for me because I get a lot of time with a specific rod and specific bait. I've learned how to use fewer baits better, instead of being overwhelmed by all the crap in my tackle bag that I "could" be throwing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My freshwater fishing is exclusively from the bank.  I use only 2 spinning rods and carry only one at a time as I'm in constant motion,  I walk and cast.  For pond or lake fishing I use a  ml rod and for high banked canals I use medium rod (need a bit more spine to drag them up a side of a canal).

I would consider my rods all purpose rods and I employ most techniques. I have not bought into the marketing ploys of the rod manufacturers.  I carry about 4 lures in my pocket and sometimes a bag of senkos and I'm good to go and I catch my fair share of fish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You certainly don't "need" technique specific rods, but lots of guys

are "collectors". Having exactly the right set-up to fish a lure

class makes the "fishing" more fun even if it has little impact on

the "catching". Three rods can cover it all, but I only carry one rod

and fish one lure class when I fish a pond.  

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely agree with RW, as he knows my "love affair" lies elsewhere and in that area I do step it up a notch. As the post is aimed at largemouth fishing I was hoping only to simplify things from a basic standpoint with emphasis on not needing to spend a fortune to catch fish.  The original post did say low budget

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing rods

    fishing rods


    fishing rods

    fishing reels
    fishing gear

    Truck Caps

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×