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Daddyodo

Backlash city!

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Went out today and tried out my new Daiwa Procaster.Got a lot of backlashes because i am new to this. I did not get anywhere near the distance or accuracy that I get from my spinning reel. I kept having my lures dive bomb to the left. I got the hang of thumbing to cut down on backlash but am not very proficient at casting'yet. tried over hand and side armed with the same results. I do like it though, very smooth. Any ideas as to what i am doing wrong? I played with the spool tightener and drag but nuttin seemed to help. Am I thumbing the spool too long on my casts/ ::)

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Did you by chance turn any of the brakes on? Because drag has nothing to do with casting.

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I tried the brake setting starting from 10 being the highest to 0. At 6 and above absolutely no distance. Once I backed off it got better but still not what I would call good. I think the furthest I got was 25 30 yards at best with no accuracy.

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Your 25-30 yards is pretty good considering thats ~90 ft.

If your casting significantly short loosen your spool tension until when you press down the thumb bar your lure drops slowly. Then since you said your brakes are too high above six leave your brakes at about 5. The rest is about educating your thumb  :) And a reason your lure may be dive bombing to the right is because the release times from spinning reels to casting are totally different.

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There are three major ways to cast a baitcaster.

1.  Overhead. Not good. Will cause spool to turn very fast and cause a backlash. You may be able to master this technique by using your thumb and stopping spool when bait hits the water.

2.  Underhand Roll. Great cast. Reel bait to tip of rod and then use an underhand flip motion to cast bait.

3. Side Arm Cast. Best method. Be careful not to have bait hit anything when casting as if you do you will have a Backlash from Hell.

Skipping Under Docks & Piers - Use spinning rig to do this until you really master the baitcaster. And then you will get backlashes with this technique.

Try balancing the reel and then casting side arm and with the under hand roll. You may find the under hand roll on Google. 

Do not cast a baitcaster with a lot of power. Try using the motion of the bait and a little arm strength to cast your baits. As you become more proficient you can then use more power when casting.

Practice, practice and practice some more. :)

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What rod?

What bait?

What line?

Sam nails it, though. Do not try to cast far, try to cast smooth. Don't worry about distance, That will come when you get the mechanics of casting down.

A sage angler told me,  Less is More

words to live by  8-)

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Three tips:

1.  Do not worry about distance.

2.  Do not worry about distance.

3.  Do not worry about distance.

Seriously, don't try to cast into tomorrow...that will come with practice and experience.  Focus on accuracy instead.

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It 's been many, many years ago ( more than 25 ) when me and Mr. Baitcaster first met, a friend of mine from Guadalajara opened a tackle store ( he owned 3 more in Guadalajara ) here where I live, until then all I used to fish were spinning and spincast reels. Mr. Baitcaster imediately became an object of desire but me being a college student didn 't have a lot of spare money around, summer vacation came and I applied for a job at his store, all I asked for payment was Mr.Baitcaster, a fishing rod and some baits, he imediatley accepted my application so I worked all summer long, at the end of the summer I got what I wanted. Jorge gave a crash course on reel settings.

It was not a fancy reel from a top brand, Silstar BC reel and Silstar pistol grip 5 '6" MH rod which paired nicely, I was so happy ! yohooooo ! I have my first BC set-up. Spooled in the line, filled the reel and got ready to try it out. Went to this pond, set the reel and made my first cast ...... zzzzzzzzzzzzz ...... kapow !!!!! ------> Megabacklash, ya know the type of backlash, the one where every coil of the line is firmly attached to a monstrous knot with multiple appendages and line coming out of every opening the reel has plus some more not yet invented. Tried to untangle the line and ended up pulling out my swiss knife and cut it, by now I only had about half of the original amount of line, ok, try again ......... zzzzzzzz....... kapow !!!!!! -----> another megabacklash, by the time I finished cutting, pulling, cussing and swearing ........ uhhhh .... Houston, we got a problem ...... there ain 't much line left to tangle some more ! . Dang ! defeated by the lack of line I went home, next day went to the store and purchased a another spool of line and proceeded to tangle it .... again. Aw man, but I 'm stubborn, it didn 't matter how much line I had to purchase that danged white man 's invention from hell ain 't gonna beat me, now it 's personal, no way I gonna let it win.

A couple of weeks later Jorge came to León to check the store, golden opportunity to ask him what was wrong....... he asked me what I did and how I did it , I explained and even took the set-up to the store to show him what and how I did, then Jorge asked me to show him how I cast, how I set the reel and all the things I did, after a while he came up with a list of flaws I had and those flaws are going to apply to you:

1.- My casting technique was wrong, casting with a baitcaster is not like casting with a spinning or a spincast reel, there 's no wrist snap, ( you can wrist snap when you have dominated the casting technique ), from your elbow to your hand the forearm should move like the arm of a catapult.

2.- The best position of the reel in relation to the ground is with the handle facing up ( righty ).

3.- To begin the learning process of how to control the baitcaster ----> TIGHTEN YOUR SETTINGS and reduce them little by little as you progress in the fine art of not backlashing, you have to practice !

4.- DO NOT TRY TO CAST A MILE AWAY, you are in the process of learning how to control the beast.

5.- Do not lift the thumb completely from the spool, lift it just enough to avoid the line from flowing above.

So, yes, it was not the greatest reel but it served the purpose, and yes, the braking system was not as accurate and as user friendly as the systemsyou find in more modern reels but the principles are the same. So, you are not going to find a BC reel "easy to cast", they are easy to cast, all of them, however, 90% of the "easy to cast" is within you.

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Do not cast a baitcaster with a lot of power. Try using the motion of the bait and a little arm strength to cast your baits. As you become more proficient you can then use more power when casting.

Practice, practice and practice some more. :)

x2

You don't need to sling it lure out there with as much power as you can.  It's more about technique.  As you get more and more proficient with it, you'll find that you'll loosen the reel up more and more.  You can hurl a lure out plenty far enough without having to horse it out there.

Practice is key.

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1.- My casting technique was wrong, casting with a baitcaster is not like casting with a spinning or a spincast reel, there 's no wrist snap, ( you can wrist snap when you have dominated the casting technique ), from your elbow to your hand the forearm should move like the arm of a catapult.

2.- The best position of the reel in relation to the ground is with the handle facing up ( righty ).

Raul, I'm in no position to disagree with you - I bought my Citica a scant month ago - but I found that once I incorporated the wrist snap in the latter part of the cast so that the reel ends facing upwards, I don't have any overruns at all, and much better accuracy. And this is with one of the six brakes on, and a pretty loose spool setting.

Daddyodo, from one baitcasting newbiew to another, this is how it went for me. For the records, I have a Citica 201E (it's a lefty reel, although I'm right-handed) on a 7' MH/F Shimano Compre.

I don't do any overhead casts, ever, not even on spinning gear, and very few underhand rolls. One fine day after I got my BC set-up, I went to my local lake to practise. I tied on a 0.5 oz spinnerbait (yes, start with a heavier lure/casting plug), set three out of six brakes on, and set the spool tension, and tried a sidearm cast. Everything went fine, except that I got no distance, and the lure went about 30 degrees to the left of where I wanted to go. Figured the second part out pretty fast. With a BC reel you want to let go of the thumb a little earlier than with a spinning rig.

I loosened the spool tension a bit, started getting better distances and some overruns in the middle of the cast. So I taught myself to thumb the spool lightly in the middle of the cast, and not let go of the spool all at once when I cast, but gradually.

Day by day, I started reducing the number of brakes, first to two, and finally to one. And then I incorporated the wrist snap. I don't know why or how, but that helps me with the overruns I was having in the middle of a cast. In fact, I cast my BC almost like my spinning setups, with the exception of releasing the thumb on the spool a bit earlier.

Honestly, in this one whole month, and I practise upto 4 days a week, I have had but one backlash, and a monstrous one at that. The lure I was throwing got caught with another rod on my backcast (I was in my kayak).

I have tried 0 brakes on, and usually get minor overruns once in a few casts. In any case, even with one brake on, I cast farther than I can set the hook; so I reverted to one brake. Take note of the wind direction. When I can't cast with the wind, I use two brakes.

And oh, listen to the folks here. There's thousands of hours worth combined experience these guys got.

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Not sure what weight lure you are using but the symptoms sound like what i had when i first started using one. Try using a heavier lure to get the feel of the baitcaster, then down size from there.

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If you are experiencing lots of backlashes and don't know why it helps to perform a lot of casts out in your yard and watch your reel, not your lure, to see when your backlash is developing. Watching your reel while you practice is interesting because you can see the dynamics of the backlash as it develops.

A backlash can start developing at the beginning of a cast, or in the middle/end of a cast. At any rate, it happens because the spool is spinning and line isn't coming off fast enough.

A backlash that starts at the beginning, right after your thumb comes off the spool, happens because your spool accelerated faster your lure. If you are casting a reel with centrifugal brakes, which work well at keeping acceleration under control, you can try applying more brakes. Or adjusting your spool tension. I have found that a reel with magnetic brakes, that don't apply much force at the beginning of the cast, require more spool tension than more brake. Sometimes these types of backlashes will work themselves out if you watch your reel. You can see the line immediately puff up but settles down because the lure has more momentum than the spool and slows down slower than the spool. So you want to take the steps necessary to control the acceleration of your spool.

A backlash that develops in the middle/end of your cast is caused because your lure is decelerating faster than your spool, so line isn't coming out fast enough throughout the flight of your lure. Like when you cast a spinnerbait into the wind, or if your lure hits the dock when you intended to cast past it (not much you can do about the latter). If you watch the spool when this happens the line will begin to puff up around the spool as it spins well after the lure as left the rod tip. Reels with magnetic brakes are good at controlling this since they seem to have the most effect after the spool as already achieved its maximum speed. More brake will probably help. On reel with centrifugal brakes more brake may help, but that can affect the front end of your cast. More spool tension can help.

My advice is to practice casting and try to determine when you backlash is developing. The differences are subtle but the steps at correcting them are different enough that I think knowing this makes sense. On most of my reels I've gotten to the point where I have them tuned that I can cast my most basic cast without using my thumb at all after the initial release while still achieving good control and distance. Any variations just require a little thumb input.

As previously stated - practice.

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1. Did you set the brakes on the reel? Either centrifugal, magnetic or both. I'm unfamaliar with your reem.

2. Did you set the spool tension knob? This is a small knob on the handle side usually that puts tension on the spool shaft. If set correctly, for you right now, your lure should fall to the ground slowly and when it hits, no more line should come out. You need to set this with every lure.

3. Cast to your side with your lure a little above your head. When the pole is infront of you, turn the reel sideways, point the rod where you want the lure to go and release your thumb on the spool almost at the same time. Or do thumb, turn, point, whichever is easiest for you right now.

4. Thumb the spool softly and when it hits the water or just about, apply enough tension to stop the line from coming out. The reason you get a backlash is because the spool is still moving at the lure stops flying through the air. Its like having a coil of rope next to you and throwing a weight on the end of it out. If you dont stop the rope when it hits the ground, the momentum keeps it goin for a little while.

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Thanks a lot guy's I appreciate the advice. To answer a few questions:

yes I did adjust the tension knob

Yes I did play with the brake. Got better as the day wore on.It is a knob with 0-10 on it. Started at 10 and worked my way from there.

Yes I am practicing every chance I get

I am using an Ugly stik (spinning) only because I haven't bought a baitcast rod yet. (just started a new job)

I have been using too much wrist action, will back off of that for now.

When I started out last nite the water color was slightly stained but when I got done it was very murkey. ALL THOSE DIVE BOMBS MUST HAVE SCARED THE S_ _ T OUT OF THOSE LITTLE FISHIES ;D ;D

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Your 25-30 yards is pretty good considering thats ~90 ft.

If your casting significantly short loosen your spool tension until when you press down the thumb bar your lure drops slowly. Then since you said your brakes are too high above six leave your brakes at about 5. The rest is about educating your thumb :)And a reason your lure may be dive bombing to the right is because the release times from spinning reels to casting are totally different.

This is probably the most overlooked aspect of learning the baitcasting technique. Baitcasting requires an earlier release than spinning. If you release your baitcaster at the same point that you do your spinning rig, the result is "divebombing".

Tom

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Your 25-30 yards is pretty good considering thats ~90 ft.

If your casting significantly short loosen your spool tension until when you press down the thumb bar your lure drops slowly. Then since you said your brakes are too high above six leave your brakes at about 5. The rest is about educating your thumb :)And a reason your lure may be dive bombing to the right is because the release times from spinning reels to casting are totally different.

This is probably the most overlooked aspect of learning the baitcasting technique. Baitcasting requires an earlier release than spinning. If you release your baitcaster at the same point that you do your spinning rig, the result is "divebombing".

Tom

That can also happen when you have the rod pointed in the air. You want it to be straight out infront of you, not pointed up at the sky.

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Do not cast a baitcaster with a lot of power. Try using the motion of the bait and a little arm strength to cast your baits. As you become more proficient you can then use more power when casting.

Practice, practice and practice some more. :)

x2

You don't need to sling it lure out there with as much power as you can. It's more about technique. As you get more and more proficient with it, you'll find that you'll loosen the reel up more and more. You can hurl a lure out plenty far enough without having to horse it out there.

Practice is key.

If you're a visual learner, the clearer way to say this (which I agree with 100%) is to allow the weight of the lure or whatever you're tossing to load the rod on during the motion of casting.  Once you feel the lure's weight load the rod get ready to release your thumb from the spool as the rod begins to spring forward.

You can get away with making sloppy casts (casts in which the lure's weight doesn't properly load the rod) with a spinning because there is no consequence but not with a casting reel.

Couple other things:

1) Don't bother using anything less than 1/2 oz to practice or something that isn't that aerodynamic for now. Anything less is probably going to contribute to lengthening your time learning.

2) The result of the lure flying to the left as you described is a clear indicator that your thumb is coming off of the spool later than it should. If you performed and overhead cast, it would make the lure slam right in front of you.

Generally, the time that your thumb comes off of the spool on casting set upto let the line out is ever so slightly earlier than your forefinger coming off of the rod on a spinning rig.

Picture a clock with 12 oclock above you and 9 oclock in front of you and 3 directly behind you.  The approximate release time for your thumb for an overhead cast is going to be somewhere between 1 and 12 oclock.  Any sooner and your cast is going to rainbow like an underhand softball pitch.  Any later and the lure is going to slam right in front of you. For the latter case get your thumb on the spool to stop it from spinning asap!  ;D  I can assure you that it will feel awkward for what you perceive is too early a time to release but you will overcome that quickly.

Stick with it and use something heavy for practice. You'll have this mastered in no time.  :)

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I can only add one bit of information that helped me. I started with baitcasters this year. All but one of my reels are Daiwas. I had to ignore the advice to let the lure drop slowly with the spool coming to a stop when the lure hit the ground. This was too loose for me. I don't know if it was because I was throwing too hard or what. I tried not to because I knew that was the wrong way for learning.

I set the spool tension knob so the lure will drop a couple inches when the rod is shook. This is with the magnetic control off. Then I set 6 or 7 on the magnetic control. 10 when I first started.

Set correctly you can make a cast without touching the spool and not have a backlash. You won't have the longest distance, but like everyone has said...don't try for distance at first. However this does require a smooth cast. (If being made without using the thumb.)  Accelerate the rod after it gets started in motion.

Stick with it. You will learn. I really enjoy my baitcasters now. Still not that good with them. Still possible to get a backlash. Fun nonetheless! ; :)

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