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dirtybirdnation

OK all this talk about ponds and snakes has...

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Anyone on this board been bit by a snake and or had a friend that it's happen too? Also Has anyone ever died because of it?

I'm a pond fisher mostly and I have yet to run across one. (knock on wood) 8)

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ive seen some fishing but never been to close to them and they were just little garder snakes but they still scare the s*** out of me. when i was pheasant hunting last year i came upon a 2 ft garder snake and he got 3 shots from the 12 gauge.

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Last year I was bummed out 'cause it rained all day on Labor Day and I couldn't get out to fish the local pond.  It finally stopped raining about 7:00 PM and so I headed out.  There is culvert where the water spills over from the golf course across the street (private water :'() but I knew the fish would be swarming on the water flowing in.  Fished until after the sun went down and nailed 'em, but also got snagged on a lot of bull rushes that were washed down.  Late in the evening I felt my lure snag something and pulled it up above the skyline and though I had a bull rush, but when I went to pull it off, it began to squirm and fell back in the water.  It was some kind of snake, probably a corn snake, but I decided that fishing was finished for the night :o

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Well rattle snakes sure know how to tell you "don 't step on me", nothing can turn a macho grown up into a sobing baby crying for his mommy faster than hearing that rattling sound three feet from you and it ain 't preciselly the Rat L 'Trap you have tied to the other end of your rod.

Fishing down here in Central Mexico is quite educational, for starters everything is thorny, besides, hot climate has hot bugs, those big 2 inch red wasps behave like an Apache helicopter, they are loaded and ready to fire, not to mention those same size black with yellow spots ones, add to them those fire ants that are averywhere ( so you better watch where you 're standing ), black widow spiders are also everywhere and to round up the experience don 't forget that we also have those very poisonous scorpions, man you gotta love this country !

Did I forget to mention those 10+ lbs bass ?  ;D

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A couple of weeks ago, I was fishing a small pond when I sensed something behind me. I slowly turned my head a saw a 4 foot water moccasin just sitting there about 6 feet away from me. Didn't want to make any sudden moves so I just kept really still. All of a sudden it slithered into the water and swam to the other side of the pond. I don't know how long it was behind me, didn't even hear it. Just sensed that something was there.

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I've been bitten by a copperhead.  Hurts like $^*@ later.  The doctor is even worse.  Deaths that are caused by snakebites in this country are extreamly  rare.  If you live in snake country watch your step especially when crossing logs or rocks, get a pair of blue jeans and good boots or gaitor's and never lift anything towards yourself.  If you learn where a snake might be you probably won't ever have any problems.  Most snakes are in a bigger hurry to get away from you as you are from them.  Some of the non-venomous species eat the smaller poisonous snakes.  

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I see alot of them.  Almost one everytime I go fishing.  Copperheads, watersnakes, watermocassins, black snakes mostly.  Scariest encounter ever was trout fishing with hip boots on.  Standing in water about 2" from the top of the boots a copperhead swam my direction.  I figured he would see me and turn like usual. He didnt, swam through my legs, least I can say is I was scared poopless.  I guess thats the only time I have ever looked down and saw a 3 ft snake between my legs. :o

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Iv been biten many of times but not by any Venomous snakes. The only times I have ever been biten is when I pick them up. If you want to see a mad snake corner a black snake they will get mad .I dont usually mess with snakes any more like I did when I was younger. Every once in a while one will get in the porch and Ill have to get it out. Most people think every time they see a snake that it is poisonous but 9 times of of ten it is just some kind of water snake. most people that get bit are the people that try to eather pick them up or try to kill them. It is pretty dumb also theres really no reason to kill them. They do more good than bad.Id rather have a snake in my house any day over a rat. AlsoI wouldnt be scared of snakes because they are quick to get out of your way.

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Out here in Eastern Washington rattlesnakes are a serious reality. I can remember when I was younger on our ranch fishing smalls creeks hearing gunshots every so often, adding another rattle to the collection. Growing up around this, one would think I was somewhat educated. One would think anyways....

My older brother and I had pinned a rattler down (just a little guy). I decided to show off and pick it up. Nothing new for me, but usually the bigger ones were easier to handle because their heads were bigger. This little guy proceeded to turn around and bite me on the hand. Two fun days in the hospital later I learned my lesson. My hand and arm swelled considerably, as my pride shrunk.

I've since enountered many, and surprisingly I've never been more comfortable around them since. The only problem I've ever had with them was when we tried to catch 'em and pick 'em up. Don't do it.. :-[. You'll usually hear the rattler before you see him, so sneaking up on him isn't all that often, but like others said above, if you can, avoid their cover. Rock cribs, rock slides, ledges, heavy weeds, and probably the most frequented spot are the rocks on river banks.

And one more piece of advice to all you snake charmers out there, don't put ice on a snake bite. Some moron that was present at the time told me to put ice on it, and I've never seen an emergency room doctor move quicker than when he found out that I had ice on a snake bite. It can potentially make the injury much worse. Many people say put a cold pack on, but it can have the effect of something similar to frostbite.

If bit, find the snake, making a positive identification for anti-venom treatment. If you can't positively identify it, kill it and bring it to the hospital with you. (BTW, younger snakes are much more dangerous than adult snakes because they haven't figured out how to control the amount of venom they inject when biting, often resulting in a larger dose.)

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Don't drink alcohol either, they can't or couldn't adminster anti-venom if you have been drinking. Also if you should ever get bit, make sure that you are able to idenitfy the snake, if not by name then by its markings, shape,features, colors might be helpful but it can vary from snake to snake.  (like Dip o snuff said)

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When I used to fish the Hatchie Bottoms in Hardeman County, TN back in the day with my dad, Cottonmouths were bad to fall out of low-lying tree limbs and into the boat.  Nothing quite like having a 4 1/2 foot Cottonmouth land less than 3 feet from you.  We carried a shortened baseball bat and a Ruger .22 for "disposal" of the intruders  ;D

If given the chance, most snakes would rather run from you than attack you.  During mating season, and during the molting period, snakes are likely to be more aggressive towards intruders.

The bottom line is watch your step.  However, a small snakebite kit isn't expensive, and wouldn't take up too much room in your tacklebox.

Another word of advice is: take the time to learn to identify the indigenous species in your area.  Especially the difference between venomous and non-venomous species.  For instance, if you find Kingsnakes around your local honey hole... leave them be.  A Kingsnake will kill and eat other, nastier specimens (such as Copperheads, Cottonmouths, and Rattlesnakes).

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And I forgot to add, down here when you 're not in rattlesnake country you are in Fer De Lance country.

Did I mention those 10+ lb bass that make the trip worth all the trouble ?

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Monday I was fishing a local reservoir from the bank. I saw a fantastic spot and climbed down the bank to it. Getting ready to cast and all of a sudden my legs start burning. I was stranding on top of an underground bees nest. Got stung about 20 times in the legs and then my arm from swatting them. Climbed the 50' bank in record time without dropping any of my gear. Luckily I just had some minor swelling.

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(BTW, younger snakes are much more dangerous than adult snakes because they haven't figured out how to control the amount of venom they inject when biting, often resulting in a larger dose.)

There sure are a lot of people that don't know about that. It's an important fact to remember. The big ones know that if they use all their poison in one bite, they'll be defenseless for a while. Big snakes will give warning bites some times with no venom injected. The smaller ones just let it flow.

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i went out yesterday to the river, about noon, low and behold a 6 foot snake of some kind! golden.. scared the pee out of me i was working the reeds and i saw one near me just start to shake... i froze and then i saw the snake just cruze by, paid me no attention, but i was trying to be still as possible. then it hit the water, and i backed up and left my "nice" spot. yeah, ill go back, just tread lightly and find out what the hell kind of snake that was.

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Fishing in Louisiana's Lc Des Allemands with my uncle when I was a teenager living in New Orleans was always a super experience.  

I remember when a big storm had passed through Southern Louisiana a few days before our trip and we saw a lot of water mocassins on the lake's shore and in the water that you would have thought they were having a convention.

We heard them hit the side of our skiff as we went through the water, too.  Lucky for us none decided to get into our boat.

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Awsome stuff guy's. This is making for a great thread. I'm in Georgia so really I have to worry about copperheads and rattle-snakes. The whole thing about snakes jumping from trees into boats, I've heard of that aswell. :o

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I think that the real deal is that when you live in places where poisonous critters prowl you have to learn to live with them and don 't do stupid things like trying to lift them up and watch where you step, where you sit or what are you wearing, you have to be more aware and keep in mind all the time that you are in their home and not the way around, they were there first.

Just to put an example, three days ago I got thirsty after eating a bag of chips while watching TV so I went downstairs to get a drink from the fridge, it was 11:00 PM, I turned on the light, headed for the fridge and when I was about to open it down there right at the door on the floor there it was......a scorpion about 4 inches in length, scorpions here are very poisonous, what I did was to step on it, picked it up and threw it into the garbage.

The advice is:

1.- Before you put your foot inside a shoe inspect it, scorpions and black widows love closed spaces like shoes.

2.- Never walk barefoot, never use sandals, wear shoes, you may step on a scorpion or a black widow.

3.- Turn on the lights and never move around in a dark place specially at night.

4.- If you use gloves for your chores inspect them before you put your hands in them.

5.- Watch where you 're putting your hands, black widows build their nests where things don 't get moved oftenly, scorpions like to hide under objects like flowerpots.

6.- When you are in the outdoors watch your step, look before stepping, look before placing your hands on rocks or trees, not only there are snakes, fire ants and wasps can give you a bad day. If you encounter a snake leave it alone !

7.- "Accidents" can happen but being bit by a snake just because you want to grab it is not an accident, it 's stupidity. Small rattle snakes don 't rattle.

On I trip I made to Chiapas I met a gentleman that was bit by a fer de lance ( we call them "nauyaca" here ), he lost a leg, two fingers, a collapsed lung and one ear, and he got medical attention ! :o

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The Fe Da Lance is one bad joker. Raul did make a good point, I worry more about spiders anymore than snakes. We have Widows and Brown Recluses and I know a few people that have been bitten by those and some got pretty bad. And they were't trapesing around in the bottoms to do it. They were bitten at home. I have gotten where I fog the campers at camp before I stay in them. I have been bitten by one spider (unknown kind) and it was a week before I could put on a shoe. I still move pretty slow getting out of a sleeping bag on cool mornings when sleeping on the ground in case of snakes, but always, even at home make sure notheing is in my shoes and such. Luckily our scorpions aren't very poisonous, but we have a bunch of them.

 As far as snakebites they will probably get you eventurally if you jack with them.  Even with the copperhead my arm and hand swelled to like 3x the normal size and they had to make insisions and split the skin to keep it from ripping.  Pain doesn't discribe the feeling.   Since I didn't want to remain in the hospital I had to sign enough realese forms that I,m not sure they even have to pay taxes anymore.  So they do take the bites very seriously.

 I have been told by some of the old timer's that it was a common practice at one time to keep snakes like a bull snake in secludeded places of homes like cuboards and under sinks  ( this was a long time ago, way before the Orkan Man) to control mice, rats and other snakes.  Many are often welcome in barns and places feed and grains are kept.  So they do have there place.  I have yet to hear a good story about snakes and chicken houses however.  ;)

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you guys make me glad to live in the great NW Oregon. where I live all snakes are for playing with and dangerous spiders are rare.

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ive seen some fishing but never been to close to them and they were just little garder snakes but they still scare the s*** out of me. when i was pheasant hunting last year i came upon a 2 ft garder snake and he got 3 shots from the 12 gauge.

It's stupid behavior like yours that results in the death of thousands of beneficial snakes (and other animals as well) each year.

Then again, you probably puffed out your thin little chest as you held your "trophy" aloft for all to see.

You may have violated a law as well, depending on your state.

I'll bet you shoot mockingbirds and larks when the Dove hunting is slow.

FlyRod

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I see mostly Cottenmouths and copperheads.I see the occaisional rattler.Thankfully,I also see lots of Kingsnakes that help keep the poisonous snakes thinned out.Stepped on a small Kingsnake one time .He just had a look at me and went off on his merry way.

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I stepped on a snake yesterday while fishing and i was wearing sandals luckly i wasnt bite it was only a garter snake though

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