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vincedia

Is this a bad time of year?

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I just started fishing last month. I have been having some terrible luck (or lack of skill)

I can't say it is the area's I've been fishing because I've tried a bunch of different spots.

Is this a bad time of year for a new angler to start? I know that it will take time to get presentations and lures right, and I've read that bass in the summer months can get extra lazy.

Should I expect things to pick up in the fall?

Is winter fishing in Eastern PA/NJ possible?

Should I not really expect things to pick up till spring?

Am I just that "poor" a fisherman that I still have a lot to learn?

Vince

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Having a lot to learn does not equate to being "poor".  If any of us quit admitting we need to learn we would be dooming ourselves to failure.

The dog days of summer are actually my favorite time to fish.  You cant go wrong with some type of texas rigged plastic bait and some patience!  Find yourself some good weed beds, wood or rocks close to some type of change in depth and toss a texas rig with or without weight over, in and around them!!!  

Dont wait till fall!!

B

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Spend some time in the BassResource.com Library, especially the Beginners Section. Although this IS a great time of year to fish, it is not necessarily a great time of year to start. Hot, summer fishing can be challenging. There is a sticky on Senkos, at the top of the "Tackle" section, that will tell you just about everything known to fish this bait. I suggest you focus on this lure only for awhile if you would like to catch some bass right now. Later you can work with other baits.

http://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_forums/YaBB.pl?num=1121527643

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Vince, I actually started bass fishing around this time of year. All I owned was one or two spinnerbaits so I threw those around until I figured out the places bass are likely to hang out. We all have tons to learn about fishing, so don't think you're unskilled. Read as much as you can stand from the Fishing Articles section you see at the top of this page to get a sense of what to look for when you're out on the water and to learn what works best with whatever bait you choose. Learning to bass fish, like most things, is about preparing yourself by educating yourself and thenthis is most importantspending as much time on the water as you possibly can. Afterwards at home sit down and think about why you caught fish that day. Where were they? What were you doing when they bit? If you didn't catch fish that day, try to review what you were doing. What part of the lake were you working and why? Fish a lot and think about what's happening, and you'll have plenty of success at whatever time of year you choose to get out there. Never give up.

Welcome and don't ever be afraid to ask questions!

Norman

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IMO, this IS a tough time of the year to fish.  I think the most difficult part is finding them.  In some of the ponds/lakes I fish regularly, the bass have just disappeared.  I think they must be out in the middle of the pond in deeper water that I can't reach from the bank.  

I don't know where you're fishing, but try to stick to smaller water.  For a newbie, there are (at least) two major categories of things to worry about: 1. how to work various types of baits and 2. how to find the bass.  If you're on a big lake and not catching fish, you have no idea whether you're throwing the wrong bait, working it wrong, or there just aren't any bass around.  If you can fish small ponds, you can reduce the importance of #2 and focus on #1.  

Stick with it.  The fishing should pick up as the water cools.  

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Since you are "just starting out", I guessing that you are doing most of your fishing from the banks -- this makes it tougher this time of year, because the fish are holding out in deeper water.  Actually, things should start picking up again in the next few weeks as Fall starts to make it's arrival.  This will trigger the fish to start feeding more often and will pull them up to the shallows.  The only "poor" fisherman, is one who has spent all his $$'s on the bait monkey ;)

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The bad thing about fishing during the summer here is the really lousy weather we get, you go out there with the inminent threat of having cats and dogs downpouring on you every minute you spend on the water. It 's that lack of reliability on the stability of weather conditions that make your day miserable.

For example yesterday, it dawned raining, then at around 9 AM it stopped leaving the sky clouded, then it rained again at 2 PM just to stop at 3:30 PM after a good downpour, then at 4 the wind began to blow fiercely for an hour just to start raining again at 6:30 PM and it disd 't stop until 2 AM. Right now there 's hardly a breeze, partially clouded skies and with temps in the 90 's. Beautiful day to go fishing and here I am.......working !  >:(

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Hang in there Vince,

I live in central Jersey and I like summertime fishing. You are right about lazy fish when its hot. Try to fish at dawn & dusk if you can, but fish all day if you can. Take Road Warrior's advice and start learning how to gently and slowly fish a dark colored weightless senko. If your patient and don't rush, I think you will catch some fish. I haven't been skunked since March. Post a picture when you nail a good fish. We will celebrate with you.

Keep on keepin on...

Ronnie

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Thanks all!

Correct assumptions for most of you as I am a bank fisherman.

I was kinda thinking that is was a little tougher due to not being able to reach deeper waters.

I am still, and always will be, reading as much as I can about plastic presentation. Hopefully I'll find a style that fits with my style.

You all are great!

Vince

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Well, I dunno ;)? Some bodies of water have Bass in the shallows down here in the summer months. In fact, most of the Bass I've caught this summer have been in water no deeper than 5-6' :o. These are bodies of water with depths down to 13' and one lake with depths to 17". The biggest(4-6 lbs) have been caught on crankbaits and soft-plastics and in the shallows and in the middle of the day too. Water temps have ranged from 87-94 degrees.

Aren't Bass cold-blooded animals? Wouldn't warmer water 'activate/energize' them? Sure, you could reach a temp where it would kill the Bass but I don't think we're at that point.

From the bank, I agree you should throw an unweighted Senko(or its copies) and/or a T-rigged worm as others have said. I move mine from stopped to briskly.  Of course, you may not be where the Bass are but keep on trying :).

Dan

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if you fish there in the evening also keep your ears open for splashes. that will tell you alot. the other night just on a wim i through out a worm and nothing for about a half hour.when i heard my first roll i move in for the kill and nabbed a 4#er.so if you can walk the banks there  follow your ears.

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i live in MD. even with the weather in the upper 90's and reaching the 100's lately i have still caught many bass in skinny water. less than 4 ft. just yesterday it was 90 and i landed a 4 1/2 lber. in 3-4 feet of water. i've been having great success casting a fat ika parallel to the shore and steadily reeling it in. not fast just steady. let it bump the rocks, weeds, sticks, twigs whatever. every other turn of the handle i'll twitch the rod to get the skirt fluttering. it's been like magic for me this year.

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I didn't mean to imply that aren't fish in the skinny water, I was just making the observation that they do tend to pull out deeper when the water heats up.  A lot of time this is due to disolved oxygen and if the weeds are dying out on the banks the water gets stale.  Nights and early morning are the best times for bank fishing during the "dog days", but I will always be out looking for the brush piles on the channel breaks if I am fishing in the middle of the day.

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I know that in E. PA right now, most message boards are reporting limited catches of bass (40 anglers, 4 keepers in a tourney last week). Most of our recent catches have been outside weedlines closer to the deep water. Landing them from the bank can be a real test. I caught a 3Lber that way earlier in the year, by the time I got her to the bank I couldn't even see the fish it was so wrapped in weeds and muck. I figured my 10Lb leader was going to snap, but I somehow got her up on shore.

Water is cooling down now, so I figure things will pick up. Or NOT!!

Winter has been weird lately. Last year we had early ice, but it was melted by end of December and never re froze. I don't go ice fishing and was out a few times over the winter, but no bass till March.

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I've had a rough time with a few spots here lately, but one thing I like to do is as soon as it starts raining I'll rush to the lake and have pretty good luck with a white buzzbait.. Seems to work at the ponds that I have bad luck at during the hottest part of the day... just a thought..

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With respect to the summer period, which of the following statements are true?

1. As water temperatures exceed 80 degrees, bass become uncomfortable.

2. During the hot summer months, bass move and feed more slowly

3. During the dog days of summer, bass lose their appetite.

4. During the summer period, bass are deeper than any other time-of-year.

All the above statements are "FALSE".

1. Bass are cold-blooded animals and they do not feel "hot" and "cold" as people do.

On the other hand, their body functions are dictated by water temperatures.

2. During the summertime, the fast-twitch muscles of bass react quicker than any other time-of-year.

3. Bass feed more heavily during the summer than any other season (highest metabolism).

4. Bass are in the deepest water during the winter months, rather than during the summer months.

Given ample dissolved oxygen, a bass will freely enter 3 ft of water during the dog days of summer

In spite of the heavy feeding that takes place during the summertime, bass are typically

more difficult to catch. The reason is actually quite basal: summer is a "Time of Plenty"

when the fry-of-the-year are large and abundant and forage is readily available.

Roger

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Never give up my friend...EVER. Every time you go out and get skunked or have the best fishing day of your life, there is something to be learned from that day. Those feesh were talking to ya...whispering information in yer ear. It is true that summertime can be a difficult time of year to fish, as a fellow bank fisherman, I can attest to that. However, I have been able to catch plenty of fish in the shallows during the time I have been able to fish this summer. And not just during the morning and evenings hours. Some right arounf mid-day in some of the most un-Godly heat you can imagine. They haven't been absolute pigs, as I believe most of them are deeper than I can reach, but they have been fish ranging from 1-3 lbs. I have been targeting shade, any type of vegetation (be it on the bank or submerged), and the shady sides of laydowns and chunk rocks. A pretty wide array of plastics has been working for me. Anything from t-rigged lizards to weightless senko knockoffs to hula grubs and so on and so forth. I have just had to find the right speed and presentation for the baits. Once I have figured that out, it gets easier. Just don't give up! ;)

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Roger,

Where ya been?

Just another Classic Post from one of most knowledgeable members.

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This is some great info.

Hey, If I can get good during less than optimal time, then it will make me better next spring...right? (ok, mebby not)

I can dream can't I?

Thanks again all,

Vince

P.S. I can't give up fishing now. The bait monkey is going strong, and I'm more relaxed than ever. I can't wait to start catching something other than catfish!

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