Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
roadwarrior

"Use a Ruler to Weigh Your Fish"

Recommended Posts

Download these tables for future reference.

The numbers are not perfect for every fish

you might catch, but close!

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9222.html

The two numbers of special note are 20.5"

for largemouth and 22" for smallmouth.

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey RW, just a question here what if you had a scale but not a ruler , could you punch the weight into the formula  and get the lentgh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above quoted charts use a logarithm which is standard amongst fisheries biologists:

Log (weight in grams)= -4.83 + 1.923 x Log (total length in millimeters) + 1.157 x Log (girth in millimeters).

It will be approximately the same as:

     Optional weight estimate based on TL*TL*G/1200:                        

Hal Schramm's:

Optional weight estimated based on TL*G*G/800:                        

For gravid appearing bass from Texas and California:

Optional weight estimate based on TL*TL*G/1000:                        

Most of the countries biologists use the Logarithm based on the typical torpedo shaped bass.

Texas and California have to adjust the formula as most of the fish there appear gravid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's actually a very valid question and yes, if you use the chart from NY's DEC you could, because the chart assumes a certain girth to length based on torpedo shaped bass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chart is off with some fish.

You have to weigh a fish on a scale to know exactly what that

particular fish weighs. As George Welcome pointed out, bass

from different regions vary significantly in shape and density.

This chart estimates "averages" based on sampling done by

the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation measured

across New York State.

** Individual results will vary **

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For bass; the formula L X L X G / 1200 = weight in lbs., works for me over the past 35+ years, accurate within 5%. L = length tip of closed mouth to end of tail, G = girth around widest area, dorsal fin down.

Any chart that doesn't consider the fishes length and girth isn't going to be accurate. You can use a factor like; 80% of the basses length can represent the average girth of a nortern strain LMB and 90% of the length for girth of the average FLMB caught in California or Texas for a ball park weight, if you don't have an accurate scale.

WRB

PS; the referenced chart appears to use a factor of 75% of length to equal girth and that is closer for smallmouth bass or thin bodied LMB, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chart is off with some fish.

You have to weigh a fish on a scale to know exactly what that

particular fish weighs. As George Welcome pointed out, bass

from different regions vary significantly in shape and density.

This chart estimates "averages" based on sampling done by

the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation measured

across New York State.

** Individual results will vary **

8-)

Average size on 35 inch walleyes. I've never heard of anyone catching a walleye that long and they have enough there get an accurate average length.  ::)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer this classic formula

[(length + girth) x my best guess on the weight] / number of witnesses who might discredit my guess = a lunker everytime

;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I prefer this classic formula

[(length + girth) x my best guess on the weight] / number of witnesses who might discredit my guess = a lunker everytime

;D

And any fish that gets away automatically doubles in size!

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Makes no sense.

I have seen a largemouth 1/4" under 24" that was 13.10

I have seen a largemouth that a tad under an 1/8" over 24" that weighed 5.82.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I prefer this classic formula

[(length + girth) x my best guess on the weight] / number of witnesses who might discredit my guess = a lunker everytime

;D

And any fish that gets away automatically doubles in size!

8-)

True that!

;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WHY DOES EVERYONE COMPLICATE THINGS AROUND HERE? Look at Brauss's signature KISS Keep It Simple Stupid

Here is the easy way

Dink

Avg Fish

Big Fish

Or the classic accounting of a days catch:

I LOST THE BIGGEST FISH OF MY LIFE< POSSIBLY THE RECORD

Case Closed Mooks ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WHY DOES EVERYONE COMPLICATE THINGS AROUND HERE?

I LOST THE BIGGEST FISH OF MY LIFE< POSSIBLY THE RECORD

Case Closed Mooks ;D

;D ;D  ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like wagn's formula the best, it's probably the most accurate.LOL

Falcon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of taking the 5 minutes you use reading this thread and downloading RW's site to get a scale the next time your in Wal-Mart. :o;)

Then you know for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my formula:

1. Got to Wal-Mart, pay twenty dollars for a digital scale.

2. Weigh sack of sugar on scale to make sure its accurate.

3. Go catch a fish.

4. Carefully hang fish on scale and obtain ACTUAL weight! Isn't that

   amazing!  :D

Now I know this is a wild concept, but I prefer using a scale. Weighing fish by measurements can be pretty close, but they can also be completely bogus. Hanging a fish on an accurate scale is the only way.

Only twenty bucks, people! Only twenty bucks! Just get one! Put down those lures your probably not going to use, walk over to the gadgets aisle, and pick up a scale!

I feel like I've taken crazy pills! ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't weigh most of my fish. I used to, with a calibrated scale, and still carry one. but it is something of a hassle,and I only do it for extraordinary fish now. After I'd done this enough I can pretty much tell. I do measure a lot of fish, against marks on my fishing rod. Knowing length, and judging body condition, you can be pretty close.

I think this is really good info. Many people really don't know what ballpark an 18" bass weighs. They catch a nice bass and later wonder, "How big was that one?" Good charts can get you in the ballpark.

Thanks, RW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Makes no sense.

I have seen a largemouth 1/4" under 24" that was 13.10

I have seen a largemouth that a tad under an 1/8" over 24" that weighed 5.82.

It's not absolute but sure looks close to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't weigh most of my fish. I used to, with a calibrated scale, and still carry one. but it is something of a hassle,and I only do it for extraordinary fish now.

I do the same thing. For most bass I catch, it's good enough for me to know that it's 17", 18", or whatever. But I always carry a scale which is tested a couple of times per year by weighing stuff that's already been weighed on certified scales at the supermarket.

Whether you weigh a lot of fish or just a few, I highly recommend testing it a few times a year. Scales that have been very accurate for a few years can and do go bad. I know that all too well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×