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Jordan Goehring

Your New Lake Tactics!?

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During the summer months after the spawn.

If you were to fish a lake that you have never been on, how would you start your day how would you end it? What would you fish with? Where would you fish? What goes through your mind when trying to figure out a pattern? What would you look for on a map? What if there was no map? Im pretty much just asking for your in depth detailed plan on what you would do?

Thanks for reading, and thank you for answering!

*Can this be moved to General Bass Fishing Forum*

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During the summer months after the spawn.

If you were to fish a lake that you have never been on, how would you start your day how would you end it? What would you fish with? Where would you fish? What goes through your mind when trying to figure out a pattern? What would you look for on a map? What if there was no map? Im pretty much just asking for your in depth detailed plan on what you would do?

Thanks for reading, and thank you for answering!

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Personally I like to try to find things that look or feel familiar to me, like the bodies of water I'm trying to fish. I'll study a map and try to read what I can about it and use that to the best of my abilities. If there isn't a lake map then I get on google or bing maps and look at them on there. I've found lots of underwater bars and humps doing that along with hidden ponds that are connected to the lake. I'd fish the same baits I'd normally fish with the conditions I find. I'd probably start trying to cover a little water to see if there is an active bite because they just finished spawning and then slow it down if I don't find active fish. I'd be looking for fish to be on secondary points or pockets in potential spawning coves or maybe still in the coves if there is good water/cover/food availiable.

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Any time I'm fishing a new lake, it isn't new to me because I've put my time in on studying the lake in advance. With paper maps, with GPS/Google Earth and other sources. I establish a plan of attack based on the time of year, years past and any sort of reports than I may find on the body of water based on the time of year I will be there. It aids in establishing a base pattern to start, using my experience and knowledge helps me eliminate or advance possible tactics when I'm on the water.

If you truly want to be successful, dedicate some time to it, and get to know the lake before you even head to the ramp and you're far more likely to score a W.

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What I do when I go to a new lake ? well, I start by trying to identify in what aspects or how much the new lake looks like the type of lakes/ponds I fish, then I use what I use and what I do as reference to attack the new lake like I attack the lakes I fish. It´s not that hard to find the fish in new surroundings when you know where to find the fish where you most commonly find them where you fish the most.

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During the summer months there is always one constant; deep water. You may catch fish in very shallow water, but they will always be near deep water. This may not be universally true, but I do not look for the exceptions. Deep is relative to the lake; on my home lake, transitional areas into at least 15-20' depths are what I'm looking for; on another 8-10' might be considered deep. Knowing this I can eliminate a lot of water before I get to the lake by studying a topo map. I recently fished a large strip pit for the first time. I could not find a map, and it was not on my Lowrance software. Strip pits are a challenge because looking at the contours of the ground above the water doesn't necessarily tell you what is below. It will take several trips to get to know the lake well, but I can give you several spots that combine grass, rock, or both, and water dropping to 20' that will likely produce some decent fish.

Once I've decided on the spots, I will plan my strategy. First thing in the morning I may move around a bit using a top water, shallow crank, and spinnerbait/chatterbait. If these don't produce well a wacky rigged Senko knock-off weighted or unweighted may be next, followed by a jig or plastic pitched tight to cover. Then I will work my way to deeper water and structure using jigs and plastics T rigged or C rigged. A shakyhead mix and a drop shot will finish my rotation. While these are my preferred methods, if my fishing partner starts hammering fish on something else, I will quickly get one in the water.

That would be my approach. There are many better fishermen who would do it differently. Finding what works for you is where you will ultimately get. Enjoy the journey.

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Below is my own proprietary approach, and not something that you'd likely read elsewhere

On every new lake, whether it's in the United States or Canada, I'll begin with a "Chart Survey",

This requres GPS cartography that's interactive with your personal computer so that the coordinates are directly acquired.

If GPS hydrography is not available for that lake, I'd select another lake because life is too short to waste on blind-fishing.

With good cartography, the Atlantic Ocean is no harder to pindown than a 10-acre farm pond.

Begin the Chart Survey by pinpointing all the best "compression points" in the waterbody.

A compression point is a localized spot where the contour lines strongly converge.

In the fish's world, it's immaterial whether compressoin is due to a Drop-off (declivity) or a Ridge (aclivity)

because the value of the holding site is determined by the gradient of the slope (steepness).

Slopes that span over a broad depth range provide a year-round habitat,

but the current depth of fish will vary with seasonal periods and pool levels. A compression point

is greatly enhanced by a "Corner" or turn in the depth lines, which is a powerful structural asset.

Here again, it's immaterial whether the corner is a Point (male corner) or Pocket (female corner).

When you're physically on the lake for the first time, the "Field Survey" can be performed.

While the Chart Survey deals with "contour", the Field Survey deals with "cover".

If suitable 'cover' exists, then the Depth Sounder is used to confirm the accuracy of the Chart Survey.

Last but not least, an "onsite save" will finally provide the real-world coordinates for the holding site.

Roger

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First, do what Roger said. He taught me how to do that a few years ago and it absolutely works, on any lake, every time. I find the more map studying I do, the less time I spend on the water searching for fish.

Second, when you get on these spots, I would use a search bait. I like a spro little john or kvd 2.5. Early or late you could use topwater like a spook. If no takers then I would try a big C-rig worm. If no luck then go to your next spot.

I would try these spots several times before I ruled them out. There will most likely be fish on these spots at some point of the day.

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I don't have a boat so I mainly fish from the bank, or in my tube. That being said, I look for cover. If I can see it above the water, it's under the water too. I keep a search bait tied on so that I can fan cast areas looking for random fish or submerged cover to dissect later. When all is said and done, I catch fish where ever I go. I feel it's mainly because I try not to over analyse it. Personally I think you can put anyone on any body of water and they can fish the way that they fish somewhere else and still manage to catch fish. Keeping it simple is my main key.

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I would identify the transition spots that were used by the fish to get to the spawning areas. Not all fish spawn at once so I will start shallow and work my way out to the up and down locations. Creek channels, drains, bars and points are common route locations. The crankbait will be the deal to cover water and depth changes. If I can get bit at a specific depth range, I might focus on that depth, at least for a while. Fish lie. If I can find vegetation with edges in 6 to 10 feet of water, I will always work that. It's a confidence thing. Grass equals oxygen, shade, cover and forage so it's a good bet. Stay hydrated. B)

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Below is my own proprietary approach, and not something that you'd likely read elsewhere

On every new lake, whether it's in the United States or Canada, I'll begin with a "Chart Survey",

This requres GPS cartography that's interactive with your personal computer so that the coordinates are directly acquired.

If GPS hydrography is not available for that lake, I'd select another lake because life is too short to waste on blind-fishing.

With good cartography, the Atlantic Ocean is no harder to pindown than a 10-acre farm pond.

Begin the Chart Survey by pinpointing all the best "compression points" in the waterbody.

A compression point is a localized spot where the contour lines strongly converge.

In the fish's world, it's immaterial whether compressoin is due to a Drop-off (declivity) or a Ridge (aclivity)

because the value of the holding site is determined by the gradient of the slope (steepness).

Slopes that span over a broad depth range provide a year-round habitat,

but the current depth of fish will vary with seasonal periods and pool levels. A compression point

is greatly enhanced by a "Corner" or turn in the depth lines, which is a powerful structural asset.

Here again, it's immaterial whether the corner is a Point (male corner) or Pocket (female corner).

When you're physically on the lake for the first time, the "Field Survey" can be performed.

While the Chart Survey deals with "contour", the Field Survey deals with "cover".

If suitable 'cover' exists, then the Depth Sounder is used to confirm the accuracy of the Chart Survey.

Last but not least, an "onsite save" will finally provide the real-world coordinates for the holding site.

Roger

what chart survey do you use??? what company or where can I get this

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I use Navionics. I have the hot maps version on my laptop and the Lakes US app for my phone. It is not compatible with my old garmin GPS but I just write down the coordinates and transfer them into my GPS. This gets me close enough to start searching with my depth finder to find the "spot on the spot"

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