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Bluebasser86

Powder Painting

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What do you guys use to heat your jighead when you're powder painting them? I usually just light a candle and use that but there has to be a better way that doesn't turn the jighead black before you dip it. Also, does anyone have any trick to keeping from clogging the hook eye with paint when you dip them or do you just have to deal with cleaning them out? Not that it's difficult, it's just kind of a hassle to clean every individual hook eye.

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The guy that is teaching me how to tie jigs uses one of those small "easy bake type" ovens. He also uses a fluid bed to dip the jig head in. The pliers he uses hook through the line tie and Im pretty sure that is how he keeps the paint out of there!

Jeff

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I just use a small butane torch wave and dip if you find out how to keep it out of the hook eye let me know been dipping jigs for bout 6 years and haven't. Found a good way to keep it out consistently

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There are lots of ways to heat the heads for individuals without going to much expense.

Some guys do it with a propane torch while others use a heat gun. I use a toaster oven so I can heat up a dozen at a time instead of just one.

I keep the paint out of the eye of the hook with the pliers that I use to dip the jig. Just take a cheap pair of needle nose and hold the jig by the eye instead of the hook. Also only heat the jig head to the point that paint goes on and is dull and still powdery. That is a real thin coat and won't run into the eye when you hang it to bake on the finish.

My heat gun came from Harbor freight for $10. My toaster oven cost $5 at a garage sale.

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There are lots of ways to heat the heads for individuals without going to much expense.

Some guys do it with a propane torch while others use a heat gun. I use a toaster oven so I can heat up a dozen at a time instead of just one.

I keep the paint out of the eye of the hook with the pliers that I use to dip the jig. Just take a cheap pair of needle nose and hold the jig by the eye instead of the hook. Also only heat the jig head to the point that paint goes on and is dull and still powdery. That is a real thin coat and won't run into the eye when you hang it to bake on the finish.

My heat gun came from Harbor freight for $10. My toaster oven cost $5 at a garage sale.

I've seen a lot of people using those angled forceps when dipping. It grabs and covers the eye and the hook when they dip.

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There are many ways to do this. I definitley would not use a candle. Reason being is the black soot from the candle coats the jig and keeps you from getting a good clean surface for the paint to stick. I use a heat gun to heat the jig, a toaster oven to cure the jigs, a fluid bed for one color and base applications and the rest all multicolor. If you want more info, PM me your e-mail and I will send you some tutorials.

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I use a toaster oven (that I picked up at a yard sale for a couple of bucks) to both heat the jigheads and to cure the paint. I set it at 375 degrees and put the jigheads in for around 15 - 20 min., dip them in the paint and hang them on a wire. After I've painted about 20 or so, I hang them on the wire rack in the oven and cure them for another 15 min.

Keeping the paint out of the hook eyes is a problem, though. I just remove the paint from the eyes before curing using a hot needle.

Maybe I'll put together a fluid bed this winter and see if that solves the problem.

Tom

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I use a toaster oven (that I picked up at a yard sale for a couple of bucks) to both heat the jigheads and to cure the paint. I set it at 375 degrees and put the jigheads in for around 15 - 20 min., dip them in the paint and hang them on a wire. After I've painted about 20 or so, I hang them on the wire rack in the oven and cure them for another 15 min.

Keeping the paint out of the hook eyes is a problem, though. I just remove the paint from the eyes before curing using a hot needle.

Maybe I'll put together a fluid bed this winter and see if that solves the problem.

Tom

Same as I do. I do use a fluid bed though.

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Okay. I paint jigheads from 1/100 to 5/8 ounce. The oven is best choice for me. Working on another idea for production. Get a toothpick and stir your paint up real good and when you put your jig in swish it around in a circle quickly and remove. This motion will help keep paint somewhat fluffy (stir as needed). Also toothpick fits inside the jar with the lid. Some colors are a pain. Watermelon is the worst for me. But get a dremel and a small drill bit and drill out the ones that covered up. Watch your hand and fingers. Pratice makes perfect. and as said earlier paint needs to have a powder look to it, but covering the head.

TT

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I use a toaster oven (that I picked up at a yard sale for a couple of bucks) to both heat the jigheads and to cure the paint. I set it at 375 degrees and put the jigheads in for around 15 - 20 min., dip them in the paint and hang them on a wire. After I've painted about 20 or so, I hang them on the wire rack in the oven and cure them for another 15 min.

Keeping the paint out of the hook eyes is a problem, though. I just remove the paint from the eyes before curing using a hot needle.

Maybe I'll put together a fluid bed this winter and see if that solves the problem.

Tom

Tom a fluid bed will help but won't solve that problem. Try heating them a lot less before you dip to get a thinner coat of paint and holding your pliers over the jig eye.

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Okay. I paint jigheads from 1/100 to 5/8 ounce. The oven is best choice for me. Working on another idea for production. Get a toothpick and stir your paint up real good and when you put your jig in swish it around in a circle quickly and remove. This motion will help keep paint somewhat fluffy (stir as needed). Also toothpick fits inside the jar with the lid. Some colors are a pain. Watermelon is the worst for me. But get a dremel and a small drill bit and drill out the ones that covered up. Watch your hand and fingers. Pratice makes perfect. and as said earlier paint needs to have a powder look to it, but covering the head.

TT

TT make a fluid bed and it keeps the paint fluffy. I have seen pics of ones guys have made and keep 4 or 5 cups going at a time. I only need one color at a time so that is all mine does but once I get a color floating I don't have to do anything but dip.

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Jig Man. Well, I have a fluid bed and use it on most jigheads but the watermelon is still tough for me and I beleive that it is paint or the hook eye diameter on the Mustads that I use on the bass jig I make. On some jigs that I make I don't use the bed at all and stir paint every few hundred jigs with a plastic spoon. Thank you for your info.

TT

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