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Root beer

Interesting Take On College

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The student loan nightmare in the US will be the next bubble to burst.

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Seems that most of the authors "points" deal more with the choices made by the students.

Most of them poorly thought out.

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I agree with a lot of what the author is saying.

http://theeconomicco...oing-to-college

Obligatory, "I hate going to school" whining post of the week?

Seems like you haven't had one positive thing to say about your education.

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Consider serving our country and be paid to receive an education.

A-Jay

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I didn't say I agreed with all of it, just " a lot". How am I whining about school in this post? This article was passed to me and I just simply read it and thought most of was pretty interesting.(I don't find the studying parts interesting, that just individual problems.) I especially like the part about high school guidance counselor. It's practically true. Least my guidance counselor never encourage me to explore trade school which could have gotten me a good job. (not that I probably would have gone, but still.) All they ever do is tell you need to go to college or you will be a failure to society. Unless that just my experience? I also know plenty of people with college education working as a server for $2.15 an hour, cashier in retail stores, and other minimum wage job while bogged down with student loan. Simply because they couldn't afford to move to another area after college to find a job. They also couldn't get jobs because there were no entry level position available and other areas wanted people with experience. I don't give a rat arse about the author's take on how much studying students do, party, etc. I just thought the job and loan parts were interesting. I'm pretty sure I've only started one thread that was "negative" about my education and that was directly to one professor who doesn't need to be teaching. (in my opinion of course.) If I really hated my education experience I would have already dropped out by now, but instead I'm 5 classes short of graduating in May. Textbook threads don't count as negative attitude towards my education.

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Here, I'm a member of Beta Alpha Psi:http://www.bap.org/ at a really, really good business program.http://business.etsu...creditation.htm. I only had two professors in the business department I had trouble with, one that I started a thread about and another I just simply couldn't understand him due to his accent. Is that positive enough?

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@Root beer.......I feel that I've read other negative threads about your education or education in general. I don't think there is any argument that school is less affordable today than it was for me in the mid 60's. IMO if you don't get your head on right, education or not, employment above minimum wage will be a dream and not a reality. Your personality may be best suited for self employment, providing you have the drive and motivation.

Interesting sidebar. My wife and I were at Costco the other day, while checking out I was observing the cashiers assistant packing us up. This man, probably in his mid 40's, moved like a short order cook, every movement was in perfect sync with no wasted motion, his comments to us and the cashier showed me he was an impressive worker. I instantly turned to my wife and said that if I were still in business, I'd offer him a job right on the spot, I know I could have taught him to do anything. No question in my mind that he was vastly over qualified for the work he was presently doing, and the economy hadn't treated him well, yet he was making the best of the situation. 30 years of hiring people, I don't need to read a resume, this man will be a winner again. This man had an aura, sad to say auras are not noticeable on a typed piece of paper.

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That was a great post Snook!

I can't even begin to say how many graduates have sent resumes to me over the last 30+ years, but I can count two or three times on the same hand how many of those people were worth what they spent on those degrees. I can't tell you how many people I have know (my own kids included) that are working completely outside of their chosen education background. There's a really good reason why the saying; "Would you like fries with that?" is directly tied to recent graduates.

With regards to the linked author, I will repeat that almost every point made was because the student made the wrong choice(s). IMHO the biggest mistake many young people make is taking every summer off during their college years. Universities operate all year long, and the vast majority of students could be taking classes during the summer, especially during the first couple of years. Just by doing this one thing, most graduates would get their diplomas in 3 to 3 1/2 years, which will reduce their cost of living during time in school. Sadly, many students fall back on the excuse of not finding the class they want instead of taking the class that fills the requirement. Perhaps worse are those students who spend the summer off without picking up part-time work.

The bottom line is that college life should mirror working life rather than high school. Unless you think you want to become a school teacher, there aren't too many decent jobs in the real world that gives them three months off each summer.

While I'm at it, I should say that A-Jay's comment about military service was spot on as well. I think many young people would be better off spending a few years away from school, and then perhaps hitting up their favorite Uncle to help pay for it later.

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"College" does share some of the blame. Yes, costs are up astronomically and there are some true diploma factories out there, but as few above have mentioned, student choices need to be part of the blame equation.

Seems to me that many folks are choosing the path of least resistance -- they pick their school, find some ridiculous major that interests them but with few job prospects, and then complain that they're a victim when they cannot find a job with decent pay.

Most students start thinking about college early during their high school careers, but all they think about is where they want to go, and what majors interest them. Very few, if any, look at the career prospects and average salaries for those that graduate with a certain degree from a certain school. Then they graduate and say "what do you mean there are no jobs for me and my leisure studies degree"? If they had taken the time to put together a plan to help them understand how long it would take to pay off student loans at X/Y/Z salary levels after graduation, different choices may have been made.

I have a family member like this. Has undergraduate and graduate degrees in musical performance from some prestigious (read "expensive") schools, accumulated a mountain of debt, and is now working multiple hourly jobs to chip away at that amount. Following your dream is great, but be prepared with Plan B in the event your dream doesn't pan out.

College is just like any other large investment. Do your own research and analysis to determine what makes sense for you. Don't go into it blind, expect to be hand-fed all the needed info and complain when it doesn't work out as you planned.

End rant.

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Beyond what is mentioned above, from what I have seen the references you can get from your professors and internships are necessary to get a job a in your chosen field, unless your dad has a job waiting for you. IMO your summer months are far better spent working than studying if grad school isn't in your future.

And ignore the naysayers, everyones got an opinion. I've seen guys get fired from every job they've had go on to have successful careers working for others, and I've seen valued and respected employees lose their jobs through no fault of their own never to recover. What you and your education are worth will vary from individual to individual.

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For a majority of college students out there ... College is one the biggest scams out there.

2008 College Grad

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I'm just glad I don't go to UT. The newly elected governor of Tennessee cut spending on education and it generally only impacted UT which sent tuition up 12% from the previous semester. That a hefty increase from one semester to the next. Well, it wouldn't affect me anyway since my tuition paid for by a third party.

I just feel a huge chunk of students don't get the right information to make their decision to go to college. I don't feel I was prepare for college. I also feel I didn't receive the reality of what was going to happened once I arrive on campus. It was nothing like I was expecting. My first year was horrible, but after that I started making As and Bs on a regular basis. At 18, I knew what to expect in the real world more than college. I do have a job interview lined up in late March or early April. It with a company I've already worked for as a merchandiser. Except I'll be hoping get on with them in the controller training program and prove my worthiness and hopefully take over all of the financial operation of a particular bakery within 1-2 years.

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I just feel a huge chunk of students don't get the right information to make their decision to go to college. I don't feel I was prepare for college. I also feel I didn't receive the reality of what was going to happened once I arrive on campus.

Who do you think should have provided you with this info?

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Consider serving our country and be paid to receive an education.

A-Jay

X2!

I've completed an Associates degree, and I'm close to finishing my Bachelor's, and I've never paid a cent for tuition.

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Putting expense aside, the plain fact is that these times are unusual. For many students that are preparing to enter adult life, the jobs of yesteryear are just plain gone, no longer available, it isn't your fault. The job you may be applying for has a waiting list of experienced workers, gives a fresh kid little chance, as experience will generally get the employment nod. Exceptions do happen, like companies cutting costs by terminating expensive help in lieu of entry level workers.

Back in the 90's when the economy was robust the competetion for graduates was fierce, resulting in very high starting salaries and signing bonuses as well. Many tradesmen were getting great offers along with signing bonuses as too.

The younger generation is a victim of the times, it isn't your fault, even dr's lawyers and other professionals are not walking into great positions now as they once did. The days of getting a job at the local plant and providing for an entire family are over, simply because that local plant is in a third world country now.

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Work while you're in college. A college degree doesn't give you the right to or prepare you for a job, it gives you knowledge to use in a job. The life experience of working and trying to go to school was easily as important as the actual classwork. Interships or volunteer work, both during the year and during the summer, are crucial for you while you are in college. If you can't find an intership, work at something as close to your field as you can. If you can earn money while being in college, you can keep your expenses down and your loans minimal. It's time to grow up and start wiping your own nose, paying your own bills, and finding your own way. What happens to you now is on you and noone else. Work hard, do the right thing and let the chips fall where they may.

As far the article, aside from college being more expensive, I thought it was a bunch of self-serving hooey. He quoted himself for pete's sake! Latin, Greek, and Greek literature were taught back then, that's why it was on the entrance exam! I could still handle the math and most of the geography/history today, 15 years after college (and I was publicly educated in TN!)

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And about 80% of all college students get degrees with no job field, or simply easy degrees that are overloaded already.

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