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Grizzn N Bassin

When Is The Water Temp Considered Winter?

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i was wondering what is the temp for the water thats considered "winter" time

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That depends on geography and, in my opinion, the behavior of the bass. In Florida and Southern Texas water temperatures may never get much below 50 degrees. Someone from those areas can explain how their bass react.

In areas where air temperatures actually go below freezing for extended periods of time, water temperatures follow a particular pattern. In the Summer and early Fall the warmer water is the upper layers of the water column. As Fall progresses, that water cools down to match the temperature of the water in deeper regions, turnover occurs, and the water mixes reaching an equilibrium with regard to temperature. From there the water on top becomes cooler than the water that is deeper. At some point as winter approaches, the deepest water reaches a temperature of approximately 39 degrees. The upper layer of water can freeze but that deeper layer remains at 39 degrees unless the lake is too shallow. Bass will tend to stay deep in that warmer water during the Winter. So, when you notice your bass are bunched up in the same deep spots over a period of time and you rarely find them shallow anymore you could say that they are in the winter season. In the latter months of winter and early months of spring (depending on location) the water starts to warm up. If you are finding bass along breaks and drops that lead to spawning areas (and much less in the deeper winter homes) the season has changed to pre-spawn. The calendar may say it is February, but the water temperatures and bass behavior determine if it is still the winter season or not.

Keep in mind that nothing is set in stone. You could have an early warm-up in February and then in March Winter temperatures could come roaring back forcing the bass back into deeper water. Also keep in mind that you can still find a bass here and there in shallow water at any time of year. We are talking about tendencies for the majority of bass here. There are always rebels. :-)

As for temperatures, bass start exhibiting winter behavior in my area when water temperatures reach the low 40s more or less.

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When the core water temperature, not the surface water, drops below 55 degrees. Send me a PM and I will send you my Cosmic Clock and Bass Calander showing each water temps for seasonal periods.

Tom

PS; take a look at the winter thread on this page a few posts below this thread.

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

LMAO !!!

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

hahaha!!!

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ohk thanks for the info.. ive read most of the articles that i could but i was just wondering about the water temp.. soo id figure id save alittle time and ont read all of the article just yet i like to save those for a car ride or when im bored in between classes at college..

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When water reaches 39.4 degrees a change is density occurs and as the water cools below this temperature it becomes less dense, lighter and goes towards the surface where it will freeze at 32 degrees. If this didn't occur, lakes would freeze from the bottom up and aquatic life as we know it would not exist.

Another factor is underground water is usually about 60 degrees, Look for underground spring water warms the deeper water zones. The core water temps In a lake never drop below 39.4 degrees, unless the entire water column freezes.

Tom

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

Took the words right outta my mouth! LOL!

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I haven't paid attention to water temperature in the past (a mistake, I know) so I'll be paying close attention to this Fall and Winter, while observing bass behavior.

Right now, water temp has held around 73 - 76 degrees Fahrenheit but cold fronts are coming more consistently.

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

Too funny ! :hahaha-024:

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

In other words, when everything in your tackle box becomes a topwater lure.

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If you are cold then they( the fish) are cold.

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Here in south Texas "winter" is when the water temp drops below 50. We rarely have lakes/ponds freeze over but the smaller bodies of water do get ice on them at times but it does not last long.

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when the water drops below 65. When it gets back above 65 its spring.

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When your lure bounces off the top of the water and just lays there, you can consider it winter. :grin:

Haha, that was funny. There is some good imput here. I did not know that the core water temp stays at 39.

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Around here, for largemouth, "winter" starts for me when the water temp drops below 45. You can catch them, but the window of oppertunity is short, they still eat, or they would die. You don't nessicarly have to look in deep water for them , but it's a good place to start. the fishing will be slow, with little spurts, maybe even just one or two fish every couple of hours. IMHO, the smaller bodies of water fish better, later, and colder, than the big ones. For no other reason than you have less water to cover to find them. For SMB, good days can be had till the water hits the upper 30's, I have caught them a couple days before the lake froze over in the fall, and the first day there was open water in the spring.

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