Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I plan to purchase a dedicated drop shot (spinning rod) this spring.  I will be using it primarily on very clear waters for small mouth and plan on loading it with 6 lb fluorocarbon.  I notice that most drop shot rods have an extra-fast action.  
Why is that preferable over fast?  On 6 lb line, wouldn't an x-fast action be more prone to snapping line?  Any insight would be welcome; thanks.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never had a problem with snapping line while drop shot fishing I use a st croix rage spinning reel with an Abu Garcia revo sx and you just have to watch how hard you set the hook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I plan to purchase a dedicated drop shot (spinning rod) this spring.  I will be using it primarily on very clear waters for small mouth and plan on loading it with 6 lb fluorocarbon.  I notice that most drop shot rods have an extra-fast action.  

Why is that preferable over fast?  On 6 lb line, wouldn't an x-fast action be more prone to snapping line?  Any insight would be welcome; thanks.

 

Drop shot dedicated rods, have different tip sections that are softer than regular spinning rods. These tip sections are softer, you are correct in wanting a softer tip section so when you present the bait and set the hook you do not rip it from the fishes mouth. Usually, you will find that extra fast actions will have a stiffer tip, this is something that you do not want for dropshotting. Action designations are varied between companies, brands, and rod lines.

 

Generally, if you are going for a spinning rod that is not designated as a dropshot rod you are going to want something with a slower action. Not exactly sure what your budget is, but the Megabass Orochi F3-610X4S Aaron Martens Limited is a great dropshot stick with what I would consider accurate descriptions in the rods power and action. It is designated as a medium light and has a moderate fast action. That moderate fast action correlates to a tip that is going to be softer in nature and have more give, which is something you want in a dropshot stick.

 

Now, you said you are looking for a dropshot specific rod, so you will want something with a soft tip section. In my opinion I would look at the following rods.

~$100 Fenwick Elite Tech Smallmouth ML/F

~$150 Shimano Crucial Dropshot Spinning Rod (I would opt for an older model crucial with the full handles, get in the power you want ml, m, mh and get an XF action I will explain later why)

~$200 Shimano Cumara Dropshot CUSDX72M (love this rod, you can get the CUSDX68M, but I much prefer the 7'2'' version, find this one used or on closeout for a great value, very sensitive and versatile stick than can even throw some shakeyheads and flickshakes)

 

~$230 Phenix Ultra MBX S700L or S700M depending on the power you need (I haven't used this one, but have heard great reviews as far as sensitivity and drop shot capabilities, even the medium 7'6'' version)

 

~$350 St. Croix LES76MLXF...............heard great reviews on this as a dropshot stick. Long rod, but very sensitive and many use this blank to build off of which speaks to its capabilities.

 

$399 Megabass Orochi F3-610X4S Aaron Martens Limited...............if you are looking for a unique JDM rod this is a good one. It fishes just like the older DGS megabass version that was around $600 or more. Great stick that is very capable as a dropshot rod. It also is versatile enough to throw some flickshakes, but is a dropshot specific rod.

 

~$500 G. Loomis NRX 822DSR  Probably the best dropshot stick out there as far as sensitivity goes. It is an amazing stick for dropshotting. Note: with how soft the tip is, this rod really is only good for dropshot. If you get this rod you will probably only and always have a dropshot tied on. Pretty much the best as it gets for dropshot specific rods at the moment.

 

 

 

Comments.....Many of the rods I listed do have that "Extra Fast" tip designation. Speaking for the Shimano's, if they are designated as a dropshot rod it will have a very soft and almost whippy characteristic tip. They will not fish stiff at all like a traditional XF tip that is not designated as a dropshot stick. The CUSDX72M that I own has the perfect tip for dropshotting and it is my dropshot specific rod right now. I love the length of the rod and it actually is somewhat versatile which is something that dropshot specific rods usually are not because they require such a soft tip that is not good for setting hooks on anything but thin wire sweeping hookset type situations. 

 

Rods that are not designated as dropshot specific rods you must be careful in selection as of making sure that the rod has the right tip-section that is soft enough to dropshot fish extremely well. I have done much research on dropshot rods and reviews as of what ones are good and what ones are not, the ones that I recommended fit my personal guidelines as being sensitive and having the right tipsection of the rod that is good for a DROPSHOT SPECIFIC ROD. There are many rods out there that CAN dropshot fish, but are not dropshot specific rods. If you are looking for something that is going to be very versatile, a dropshot specific rod is not the way to go.

 

Off the top of my head some very good versatile spinning rods that you CAN dropshot fish with are the DX702SF, DX742SF,, Avid 6'8'' MXF and there are many others. Note, that these rods are not specific to the dropshot technique, but are very versatile rods. If you are only going to have one spinning rod, you are not going to want a dropshot specific rod. It will not have the power in the tipsection to set the hook well for small jigs/t-rigs and so on.

 

I fish in very clear lakes where I feel it is in my best interest to have a dropshot specific rod. As far as price to performance goes I feel the Cumara (old version) is where it is at. I got mine for less than half of its retail value and it is plenty sensitive for a dropshot stick and it has the desired action and softness in the tipsection taht I look for in a dropshot rod. In the waters I fish dropshotting at times is very essential and really any of the rods that I have mentioned are more than capable of handling your dropshot needs. It all depends on your budget and preference in length and action.

 

You may get recommendations that people use for dropshotting as well as many other techniques, these are versatile spinning rods, not necessarily dropshot specific rods. You are going to have to decide for yourself as of what you want. You can get rods that are stiffer in the tipsection that are able to dropshot, just won't be as good as the ones that are dropshot specific rods. I also encourage you to check out the following video. He is fishing the DGS megabass rod that fishes the same as the Orochi model that I have noted above. Notice how much the tip gives during his presentation and how he catches a very small fish, but it looks like he has a 5lb bass on there. That should give you a good idea about the technique itself and how the midsection of the rod is where you are going to end up fighting the fish. Not the tip of the rod, which is why a soft tip is desireable for the dropshot technique and presentation. Good luck and if you need anymore help in selection let me know.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dobyns DX702SF is one of the best dropshot rods I have ever used, hand down.  

 

Thats funny, I was just going to post the DX701SF in the same light. Great minds think alike! I like a little less rod to keep from overpowering the rig and inadvertently moving the weight and overworking the plastic above it. Thats just me. For years I used a 6'6" light St Croix Avid and did well, the Champion Extreme is a much better rod though.

 

Just be careful to not go too heavy or you lose the feel of that ball of lead sitting on the bottom and in turn lose all thats great about the drop shot. The light/Medium light options are just about right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cant speak for the the other rods mentioned but I really like my loomis 822 Bass rod. Its no NRX but I would compare it to IMX in there line up and it can be had for Around 255.00.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a rod labled as a "drop shot" specific rod, but I do have a rod I almost always use exclusivly for drop shotting.........if that makes any sense. My rod is a St Croix Avid 7' ML/F spinning rod, and with all the fish I have caught drop shotting on this rod, it would be hard to convince me that a I need a "drop shot" labled rod.  IMHO while all the rods made and called drop shot rods no doubt excell at that technique, but might be poor choices for anything else, you will find plenty of rods that will be just fine for dropshotting and as a bonus have a little versitility for a few other techniques............like the rod I use. Technique specific tackle is great, and it's nice to have a set up dialed in to every thing under the sun, but it's deffinatly not needed for alot of stuff.....drop shotting IMHO is one of them where it's NOT needed, almost any ML, or M powered spinning rod with a F or XF action will fish it,and fish it well. In fact the only two techniques that I personally think you need matched specific gear for are deep cranking, and heavy cover flipping/punching.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't have a rod labled as a "drop shot" specific rod, but I do have a rod I almost always use exclusivly for drop shotting.........if that makes any sense. My rod is a St Croix Avid 7' ML/F spinning rod, and with all the fish I have caught drop shotting on this rod, it would be hard to convince me that a I need a "drop shot" labled rod.  IMHO while all the rods made and called drop shot rods no doubt excell at that technique, but might be poor choices for anything else, you will find plenty of rods that will be just fine for dropshotting and as a bonus have a little versitility for a few other techniques............like the rod I use. Technique specific tackle is great, and it's nice to have a set up dialed in to every thing under the sun, but it's deffinatly not needed for alot of stuff.....drop shotting IMHO is one of them where it's NOT needed, almost any ML, or M powered spinning rod with a F or XF action will fish it,and fish it well. In fact the only two techniques that I personally think you need matched specific gear for are deep cranking, and heavy cover flipping/punching.

 

Only thing is the OP designated he wanted a dedicated DS specific rod. I, personally, have found a use for such a rod and know many others have as well. A ML/F rod, by characteristics will end up having a softer tip and lighter power that will work good as a dropshot rod. Note earlier the fenwick elite tech smallmouth ml/f. Medium power XF rods that are not dropshot specific rods I feel have too stout of a tip for dropshotting specifically. Usually, a medium light rod will have a softer tip since it is a lighter powered rod all together.

 

Dropshotting can be a very effective technique if you are fishing the right waters and conditions and the OP seems to think so since he clearly stated wanting a DS specific rod.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 and the OP seems to think so since he clearly stated wanting a DS specific rod.

 

Actually, he said he wanted a dedicated dropshot rod.  My dedicated dropshot rod for many years was a 6'6" ML Fast St. Croix Premier even though it wasn't labeled as such.   I have five of those rods and used them for everything I used a spinning rod for with success, and believe it or not that included skipping docks and hauling fish out of laydowns and brush.  But what that rod excelled for was clear water smallmouth fishing.   A couple years ago I got the Legend Tournament ML XF "dropshot rod" and to tell you the truth, I don't see a whole heck of a lot of difference in feel or action to justify the cost difference.  It's a nice rod, don't get me wrong, but it doesn't do any more than my Premiers did.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone is thinking about Loomis rods they are going up 20% soon! The new GLX look and feel good, about $450, the NRX's will $600 after the price increase!

A recreational angler can get by with a good 2 power or med/light "trout" rod or standard action, you don't want a fast action rod with clear water drop shot that uses 6 lb line small octopus style hooks. If you tournament fish A specific drop shot action 2 power rod 6'10" to 7'3" from a rod maker that has good customer service and style you prefer within your budget. The Shimano CUSDX72M, Dobyn's DX702SF are both popular out west.

Tom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, he said he wanted a dedicated dropshot rod.  My dedicated dropshot rod for many years was a 6'6" ML Fast St. Croix Premier even though it wasn't labeled as such.   I have five of those rods and used them for everything I used a spinning rod for with success, and believe it or not that included skipping docks and hauling fish out of laydowns and brush.  But what that rod excelled for was clear water smallmouth fishing.   A couple years ago I got the Legend Tournament ML XF "dropshot rod" and to tell you the truth, I don't see a whole heck of a lot of difference in feel or action to justify the cost difference.  It's a nice rod, don't get me wrong, but it doesn't do any more than my Premiers did.

 

You are pulling hairs here. A "dedicated drop shot rod" = a rod that will be dedicated for dropshotting only. If you are going to use a rod that you will dedicate for dropshotting only then you will want a "dropshot specific rod". 

 

The OP never designated that he wanted an all around spinning rod that could meet all of his spinning rod needs as you mentioned with your 6'6'' premier that you bought 5 of. Frankly, I feel that 6'6'' is too short of a rod to dropshot with, it does not have the length to control the fish when dropping the bait straight down.. One could dropshot with a G. Loomis BSR 852s GLX (a great spinning rod), but that does not make it a rod that is great for dropshotting, its tip section is too stout and it is better for jigs and weightless plastics. Point being, as I mentioned above, many rods can dropshot, but there are rods that are better than others at it. If you are wanting to get a dedicated dropshot rod then you are going to want a rod that is made for dropshotting since it is dedicated for that technique. I gave the characteristics that one should look for in a dropshot rod and recommended many different ones trying to help the OP find a rod that he could dedicate for dropshotting.

 

I can not speak on behalf of the 6'10'' MLXF rod you mentioned, but St. Croix when they announce their lineups gives each rod a designated usage. The St. Croix Legend that I owned was labeled "Finesse Jig", but I found it to be much better at different things. Furthermore, take the Shimano Crucial and Shimano Cumara dropshot spinning rods that I recommended. That is a whole lineup that are all dropshot specific rods. That is much different than a lineup of rods that one so happens to be labeled "dropshot". Members I spoke with about the 6'10'' MLXF St. Croix found it a very nice and sensitive rod that they could use for many things, maybe not the best dedicated dropshot rod. I dont know, that is why I did not recommend it.

 

Furthermore, I would be far more confident in using a 6'9'' Fenwick Elite Tech Smallmouth ML/F for dropshotting than a 6'6'' St. Croix Premier. The rod is exceptional at its price range of $100 shipped (or less at some local places), it is extremely light and sensitive, has a nice soft tip, and fishes above its price point. 

 

Some people like having rods that they use solely for one purpose. There is nothing wrong with that and if you have enough outfits to do so then I say why not. A dedicated dropshot rod can be very useful if the technique is very effective in the waters you fish and I know of many members who choose to have a rod that they use solely for dropshotting and will not tie anything else on but a dropshot. In such a case, you want a rod that is a dropshot specific rod designed to have all the characteristics that one would want in a dropshot rod.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

personally, im not a believer in high dollar rods. i use Shakespeare rods because they have served me well for all my fishing over the years. i have a 7ft Medium Ugly Stik and a 7ft Medium Shakespeare Tiger rod(both spinning) that have worked great for me as drop shot rods. Plus they also work well for many other techniques i fish.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If anyone is thinking about Loomis rods they are going up 20% soon! The new GLX look and feel good, about $450, the NRX's will $600 after the price increase!

A recreational angler can get by with a good 2 power or med/light "trout" rod or standard action, you don't want a fast action rod with clear water drop shot that uses 6 lb line small octopus style hooks. If you tournament fish A specific drop shot action 2 power rod 6'10" to 7'3" from a rod maker that has good customer service and style you prefer within your budget. The Shimano CUSDX72M, Dobyn's DX702SF are both popular out west.

Tom

 

X2!! I own the CUSDX72M and it is an exceptional dropshot rod, very sensitive with the perfect length and tip IMHO. I also have heard good things about the DX702SF and also heard it is very versatile as well. If you are deciding between the DX702SF and the DX742SF know that the 742 is slighly more powerful. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright question for you guys relating to the topic.

I was given a new 7'2" shimano crucial drop shot rod for xmas. M XF. Rated for 4-8lb test. I paired it with a shimano ci4 2500 spinning reel spooled with some 6lb invisix I had laying around. I rarely drop shot and was planning to use this rod with light t-rigs, shakeyheads, weightless plastics, and wacky rigs. I have not had any time on the water with it because everything is ice.

"Finesse" fishing isbone area I would like to improve and experiment with after the thaw this year. Do you all think this rod will be sufficient?

Im a little skeptical about hook sets but as I said I havnt been able to fish it yet.

Thanks

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are pulling hairs here. A "dedicated drop shot rod" = a rod that will be dedicated for dropshotting only. If you are going to use a rod that you will dedicate for dropshotting only then you will want a "dropshot specific rod". 

 

The OP never designated that he wanted an all around spinning rod that could meet all of his spinning rod needs as you mentioned with your 6'6'' premier that you bought 5 of. Frankly, I feel that 6'6'' is too short of a rod to dropshot with, it does not have the length to control the fish when dropping the bait straight down.. One could dropshot with a G. Loomis BSR 852s GLX (a great spinning rod), but that does not make it a rod that is great for dropshotting, its tip section is too stout and it is better for jigs and weightless plastics. Point being, as I mentioned above, many rods can dropshot, but there are rods that are better than others at it. If you are wanting to get a dedicated dropshot rod then you are going to want a rod that is made for dropshotting since it is dedicated for that technique. I gave the characteristics that one should look for in a dropshot rod and recommended many different ones trying to help the OP find a rod that he could dedicate for dropshotting.

 

I can not speak on behalf of the 6'10'' MLXF rod you mentioned, but St. Croix when they announce their lineups gives each rod a designated usage. The St. Croix Legend that I owned was labeled "Finesse Jig", but I found it to be much better at different things. Furthermore, take the Shimano Crucial and Shimano Cumara dropshot spinning rods that I recommended. That is a whole lineup that are all dropshot specific rods. That is much different than a lineup of rods that one so happens to be labeled "dropshot". Members I spoke with about the 6'10'' MLXF St. Croix found it a very nice and sensitive rod that they could use for many things, maybe not the best dedicated dropshot rod. I dont know, that is why I did not recommend it.

 

Furthermore, I would be far more confident in using a 6'9'' Fenwick Elite Tech Smallmouth ML/F for dropshotting than a 6'6'' St. Croix Premier. The rod is exceptional at its price range of $100 shipped (or less at some local places), it is extremely light and sensitive, has a nice soft tip, and fishes above its price point. 

 

Some people like having rods that they use solely for one purpose. There is nothing wrong with that and if you have enough outfits to do so then I say why not. A dedicated dropshot rod can be very useful if the technique is very effective in the waters you fish and I know of many members who choose to have a rod that they use solely for dropshotting and will not tie anything else on but a dropshot. In such a case, you want a rod that is a dropshot specific rod designed to have all the characteristics that one would want in a dropshot rod.

This post says it all folks. You will not let anyone else talk on this thread with out getting the last word in. I must have missed the memo in myPM box declaring you the all knowing drop shot rod expert, and all questions about drop shot rods should be answerd by you and you alone. And none of the rest of us know anything.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
personally, im not a believer in high dollar rods. i use Shakespeare rods because they have served me well for all my fishing over the years. i have a 7ft Medium Ugly Stik and a 7ft Medium Shakespeare Tiger rod(both spinning) that have worked great for me as drop shot rods. Plus they also work well for many other techniques i fish.

 

 

May have started a S*** storm with the rod snobs with this comment. lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm using a Powell Diesel 6'10 M/XF rod for my drop shot. I bought 2 so one will be for the drop shot and the other for shaky/wacky apps. Powell makes a drop shot specific rod but I called and spoke with the owner Keith and he said this would work great for it. This just tells me I don't need something marked 'drop shot' on the rod for it to work well. Just like others have already mentioned. I mean why would he not try to push the more expensive rod on me? He was just being honest. It's not needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alright question for you guys relating to the topic.

I was given a new 7'2" shimano crucial drop shot rod for xmas. M XF. Rated for 4-8lb test. I paired it with a shimano ci4 2500 spinning reel spooled with some 6lb invisix I had laying around. I rarely drop shot and was planning to use this rod with light t-rigs, shakeyheads, weightless plastics, and wacky rigs. I have not had any time on the water with it because everything is ice.

"Finesse" fishing isbone area I would like to improve and experiment with after the thaw this year. Do you all think this rod will be sufficient?

Im a little skeptical about hook sets but as I said I havnt been able to fish it yet.

Thanks

Should be a good, just set your drag at 2 lbs and trust it. This should prevent over zealous hooks sets breaking your line or bass breaking off near the boat. You can learn to back reel on stronger fish, it takes a lot of practice.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm using a Powell Diesel 6'10 M/XF rod for my drop shot. I bought 2 so one will be for the drop shot and the other for shaky/wacky apps. Powell makes a drop shot specific rod but I called and spoke with the owner Keith and he said this would work great for it. This just tells me I don't need something marked 'drop shot' on the rod for it to work well. Just like others have already mentioned. I mean why would he not try to push the more expensive rod on me? He was just being honest. It's not needed.
That is what I call a general use "trout" rod, good all around spinning rod for price. I started split shotting and drop shotting with a similar Finwick rod several years ago and gave the rod to my son and did well with it. The higher end rods are lighter weight and you do get better feed back with them, but they cost a lot more.

Enjoy your new rods, they should be good.

Tom

PS ; don't take "trout" as being a negative, it's not met to be!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I don't drop shot often but will be using it more this season since I bought a boat. That may have been why he suggested the diesel over a more technique specific rod but I don't know. I'm a firm believer in the fisherman and technique. You can buy the most expensive golf clubs made but if you suck at golf they won't help. You still suck at golf.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I valued the first page of posts.  Got a bit petty at the end.  Better to not say anything than talk trash.

 

I appreciated skeletor6's detailed responses; it was the type of information I was hoping to receive.  I was really hoping to hear about the fast vs x-fast actions and what the benefits/risk might be when using lighter line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This post says it all folks. You will not let anyone else talk on this thread with out getting the last word in. I must have missed the memo in myPM box declaring you the all knowing drop shot rod expert, and all questions about drop shot rods should be answerd by you and you alone. And none of the rest of us know anything.

Great idea. Let's direct all the hate towards the only person in this thread that has given a very good detailed and more than helpful explanation towards the OP's exact question....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great idea. Let's direct all the hate towards the only person in this thread that has given a very good detailed and more than helpful explanation towards the OP's exact question....

No hate............but when two different people give there opinions on what they use for drop shotting rods, just to let the OP see another point of view, said "person" has to go on long winded semi rants on why we are all wrong, and that anything other than what he suggests is just a waste of time.  I don't care if people like or even read what I post, put me on your ignore list if you don't want to see or hear from me. I am not the most tactfull wordsmith around...........so more times than not I just let it fly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well not all rods are the same so fast and extra fast are just labels really. There is no standard for this set in the fishing world. All manufactures can be different. Ones extra fast may be another's fast. Here is something that may help you out.

X-Fast: Upper 20% flexes

Fast: Upper 30% flexes

Med-Fast: Upper 35% flexes

Mod-Fast: Upper 40% flexes

Moderate: Middle flex point

Slow: Flex progressive from tip to butt

image_zps89c5e5fa.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×