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jhoffman

Red Lures

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Id like to know your thoughts on the color red. I was thinking about this last night. I own some red, they do work but for what reason I am not sure.

 

#1 - Its well known that the color red is lost at a depth of about one foot deep

 

#2 - Although I have cooked a crawfish and they turn red I have never seen one turn red in the wild. I have also never seen a red species of prey fish.

 

Why does this color work?

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Id like to know your thoughts on the color red. I was thinking about this last night. I own some red, they do work but for what reason I am not sure.

 

#1 - Its well known that the color red is lost at a depth of about one foot deep

 

#2 - Although I have cooked a crawfish and they turn red I have never seen one turn red in the wild. I have also never seen a red species of prey fish.

 

Why does this color work?

I don't get it either. Isn't there a red fishing line that is supposedly "invisible" in the water? So if red turns "invisible", then yeah...I don't know why it works.

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Here is a pretty good article on it: http://www.midwestoutdoors.com/magazine/article.cfm/44/Does-Color-Make-A-Difference-To-Fish/

 

“Bass are functionally most sensitive to colors in the ranges of red-orange and yellow-green. However, that is not to say that “colors” like black and white, or colors like blue that are perceived as grey are ineffective, since sometimes these colors contrast better against the prevailing background than do colors to which the bass is more sensitive. For instance, in a reddish muddy river, although the dominant available color is red and bass are most sensitive to red-orange, a lure with a brownish red crawdad pattern would be difficult for the bass to see. Black lures, on the other hand, would contrast much better and be more easily detected.”

 

(a more in depth reading would be beneficial to get a better understanding)

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I don't get it either. Isn't there a red fishing line that is supposedly "invisible" in the water? So if red turns "invisible", then yeah...I don't know why it works.

 

Cajun Red fishing line

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Here is a pretty good article on it: http://www.midwestoutdoors.com/magazine/article.cfm/44/Does-Color-Make-A-Difference-To-Fish/

 

 

 

 

(a more in depth reading would be beneficial to get a better understanding)

 

 

I understand it doesnt vanish it bascially becomes a shade of gray. If its about contrast and we know it turns gray why not just make them gray to start with?

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Crawfish are deep red as they emerge from their wintering holes.  It is a crucial spring time color pattern on many lakes up here.

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I understand it doesnt vanish it bascially becomes a shade of gray. If its about contrast and we know it turns gray why not just make them gray to start with?

 

That depends on water clarity. It's not a black and white issue (pun somewhat intended lol). As the article indicates:

 

“In clear water, the color red is the first to totally disappear, normally in the range depth of 35-feet. Blue light, in contrast, can penetrate down well below 100 feet. However, all that changes if the water contains floating algae particles or sediment. Algae strongly absorbs blue, violet, and red lights, leaving the water with mostly a green cast. Sediment tends to strongly absorb all but red light, leaving the water with a pronounced reddish color. Under these conditions, while there is less light available at any depth in general, the available light spectrums in these two scenarios are dominated by green and red light, respectively. Obviously, if a fish is to see well in these conditions, it must be sensitive to these colors, even if its highest color sensitivity lies somewhere else in the spectral range.”

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Most of the year a Blue Chrome Red Eye Shad outperforms any other color for me.

However, in the spring Red rules!

 

 

 

:fishing-026:

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Crawfish are deep red as they emerge from their wintering holes.  It is a crucial spring time color pattern on many lakes up here.

Yes, I have seen dark red crawfish too. 

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Ive never dug them out in early spring to see them. Im used to the color on most of my craws being between a very light olive to almost black.

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This is my #1 spring bait -I have caught so many fish on this red shad color that I just cant put it down  I started as soon as water temps were in the high 30's and now in the lower 50's -They just attack it-so Im staying with this color

post-10213-0-12636500-1366903710_thumb.j

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Ive never dug them out in early spring to see them. Im used to the color on most of my craws being between a very light olive to almost black.

 

This isn't anecdotal observation - it's sort of a fact deal.  They emerge red.  It has to do with diet.  Their color returns to normal as we head into summer.

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What are they eating, things like scuds or is it dying vegitation?

 

I know scuds due to the kerotine in them will turn trout flesh orange.

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This is my #1 spring bait -I have caught so many fish on this red shad color that I just cant put it down  I started as soon as water temps were in the high 30's and now in the lower 50's -They just attack it-so Im staying with this color

 

You can send me a few to test

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I can't remember if it's iron in the clay they burrow into or the bugs they eat.  All I know is they're red when they emerge.  I'm not the only one that has noticed this, and several people agree that red is a great early color. 

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Posted · Hidden by J Francho, April 26, 2013 - No reason given
Hidden by J Francho, April 26, 2013 - No reason given

You'd have to google it, I can't remember if it's iron in the clay they burrow into or the bugs they eat.  All I know is they're red when they emerge.  I'm not the only one that has noticed this, and several people agree that red is a great early color.  Sometimes we gotta do our own research. You can't expect to be spoonfed all the time.

The first half of this was helpful. The second half was total D-BAG, why do you feel the need to do this all the time?

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I know how to use google, at least I hope so but I thought we were having a conversation. Guess not, share information on forum... odd idea.

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Isn't this a bit like asking why black bears are black, or why Cardinals are red or Blue Jays are blue? It's genetics more than diet, but diet and location played a role in the past. Go to an area with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procambarus_alleni'>Blue Crayfish and blue hues will be hot in the spring instead of red.

 

An article for sauce: http://www.bigindianabass.com/big_indiana_bass/2013/03/more-fun-facts-on-blue-crayfish.html

 

 

 

According to this older paper (1970), crayfish coloring is likely the result of part genetics and part diet. The pigment responsible for coloration in crustaceans is a carotenoid called astaxanthin, commonly found in salmon, shrimp, crustaceans, crayfish, microalgae, yeast, krill and trout. It usually expresses itself as the color red if unbound to a protein, or a variety of other colors if joined to a protein. There is even some interesting research that shows some birds that eat crayfish actually develop red coloring of various body parts due to the ingestion and translocation of astaxanthin.

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Its nothing at all like asking why a black bear is black. I asked why red lures work based on the fact I have never seen a red one that wasnt cooked and the theory of color under the surface of water.

 

Yes I have seen diet affect those things eating them, hence the reference to trout eating scuds and turning orange. The scud doesnt turn orange until he is dead,

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Im sorry for asking a question that requires some actual thought or input on the subject. Ill stick to asking whether or not you can tell me what crankbait I should buy, thats always interesting.

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This guy looks pretty red to me. And uncooked.

 

 


stock-photo-the-red-crawfish-in-aquarium

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Im sorry for asking a question that requires some actual thought or input on the subject. Ill stick to asking whether or not you can tell me what crankbait I should buy, thats always interesting.

 

And I am now sorry I actually did that research since it goes unnoticed.

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I agree, but I have never enconterd this on the waters I fish.

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And I am now sorry I actually did that research since it goes unnoticed.

 

it wasnt directed at you. I read what you quoted

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I would search Youtube.  I've also read about it in the In-Fisherman books on smallmouth and largemouth.  I've observed it myself, as well as blue crayfish, especially after molting. These are things I've learned myself over the years.  Yes, it's about sharing info and having discussions, but at some point you have to become a contributor, and not a taker.  You can't just get all your answers spoon fed.  Several quickly answered with the why, or that they've noticed it too.  Now you have the basis to check it out and learn more.  It's beyond the scope of a forum to go into researching the biology and physiology of local crayfish species and boil it down into one post especially for you.  Especially when you seem bent on debating whether it's even true.

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