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B_Gilbert

Bullet Sinkers And Weighted Hooks...

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I was just wondering why you see a lot of pros using bullet sinkers on their worms(pegged and unpegged) and hardly ever see them using weighted worm hooks with the bullet sinker already attached to the hook...  Is there a reason for this?  Are the unattached bullet sinkers that much better?  When I say weighted hooks I'm referring to something like this:  http://www.basspro.com/LuckEStrike-Perfect-Finesse-Worm-Rig/product/90003/    

 

Thanks! 

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probably because of the cost, limited hook and weight size combos and you can peg a weight and get the same result if needed.  Also even with a pegged weight the bait has the ability to move around a little but creating more action.  on this rig that is not the case.

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probably because of the cost, limited hook and weight size combos and you can peg a weight and get the same result if needed.  Also even with a pegged weight the bait has the ability to move around a little but creating more action.  on this rig that is not the case.

Exactly.............could you imagine the ammount of the  pre-mfg'd. hook/sinker combos you would have to carry around to cover different situations.  It would be semi-rediculous, yet a couple backs of bullet weights, worm hooks, and bober stops, you can cover all your bases with 2/3'rds less "stuff"

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First off Welcome to BR ~

 

As mentioned, customization is key.

 

Also what happens when that hook point is done or rolled over ?

 

 Are you discarding your weights ?

 

A-Jay

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Well...  I don't fish a lot of plastic worms, well I guess thats not true..  I dont fish a lot of Texas rigged or Carolina rigged worms, usually if I'm fishing a worm I'm dropshotting it...  But basically when the hook started to roll or the point went bad I just tossed that out and put on a new one, wasn't that expensive for me because I didn't do it much...  Not a lot of shakey head fishing and stuff in the inland lakes in Michigan where I'm from, not a lot of hard bottoms... 

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Well...  I don't fish a lot of plastic worms, well I guess thats not true..  I dont fish a lot of Texas rigged or Carolina rigged worms, usually if I'm fishing a worm I'm dropshotting it...  But basically when the hook started to roll or the point went bad I just tossed that out and put on a new one, wasn't that expensive for me because I didn't do it much...  Not a lot of shakey head fishing and stuff in the inland lakes in Michigan where I'm from, not a lot of hard bottoms... 

 

I hear that - I'm up in Otsego County and one in ten lakes might have A rock on the bottom, otherwise it's all decaying plant life . . . .

 

A-Jay

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What do you normally fish when the bottom is like that?

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I hear that - I'm up in Otsego County and one in ten lakes might have A rock on the bottom, otherwise it's all decaying plant life . . . .

 

A-Jay

That's too bad, I love hard bottoms.. 

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First off Welcome to BR ~

 

As mentioned, customization is key.

 

Also what happens when that hook point is done or rolled over ?

 

 Are you discarding your weights ?

 

A-Jay

 

First off Welcome to BR ~

 

As mentioned, customization is key.

 

Also what happens when that hook point is done or rolled over ?

 

 Are you discarding your weights ?

 

A-Jay

 

Thanks A-Jay!

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I like to use a springlock hook with plastics, it gives me confidence that the bait will stay. Then I can peg/not peg a bullet weight and not have to check my plastic every cast.

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I was just wondering why you see a lot of pros using bullet sinkers on their worms(pegged and unpegged) and hardly ever see them using weighted worm hooks with the bullet sinker already attached to the hook...  Is there a reason for this?  Are the unattached bullet sinkers that much better?  When I say weighted hooks I'm referring to something like this:  http://www.basspro.com/LuckEStrike-Perfect-Finesse-Worm-Rig/product/90003/    

 

Thanks! 

 

I actually use those jigheads a lot in 1/4oz for creature baits.

 

Allen

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The possible combinations of hook size and style and sinker weight are enormous, no manufacturer offers that.

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There are a few on the market like Owner Ultra sled head and bullet head Jigs.

Tom

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Those Lucky Strike finesse rigs, they make them in lots of different sizes.  Anyway, in the 3/8 and 1/4 oz sizes they are a great option for pitching 10" worms in timber, where for the most part you want to peg the weight anyway.  Also, with the pointed head and in-line pull point, they work good in grass & weeds.  I throw the 1/4 and 3/8 oz ones with 17 lb fluorocarbon, or if I pick a different jig rod I might throw 15 lb.

 

I just noticed that the Lucky Strike Finesse rigs only go to 1/4.   Lucky Strike also makes, or used to make a very similar rig in heavier sizes, which I referenced above.  Both of these rigs are kind of bubba versions of the Brewer Slider rig.  Go to the Brewer web site and you'll see a bunch of different weight/hook options.  You can also go to *** and they will have dozens of similar designs.  The Owner sled head referenced in the post #13 by WRB is one of those.  Like lots of other fishing tools, I think that the tx rig jig has its time & place.

 

Me, I own lots of different variations, but I probably use the Brewer slider head more than all the rest of them put together.

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Bullet sinkers will pull a bait down nose first, while a weighted hook gives a more horizontal, gliding fall. Bullet sinkers will make the back end of a bait stand up more. I don't use weighted hooks for worms, but occasionally for lizards and flukes and craws, when I want a slower falling, horizontal, gliding action, weighted hooks are better. With something like flukes, it allows you to fish it faster horizontally, keeping it at a more stable depth...but a combination of the two...never tried it. Sweet, now I have something to test in my bathtub during cabin fever season!!!

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I've had issues getting hook sets with those types of hooks for some reason.

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