Jump to content
Duckbutter100

Can I Use The Lead Of Off Wheel Weights?

Recommended Posts

I have a tire shop near me who will sell wheel weights buy the bucket full. Is there any issue anyone can think of using them to melt down?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I've seen people melting down.  Do a youtube search for melting down wheel weights.  I know you do have to skim off all the crud that is attached to the weights, and you have to pull out all the steel pieces that are left after the lead melts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also make sure they are 100% dry when melting them!

Jeff

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use wheel weights occasionally and they work alright. They're always really dirty tough so you have to make sure to flux the lead really well and get all the junk out. I usually just use wire cutters and cut the metal pieces out by cutting right along the edges on both sides of the mounting bracket. You miss a little bit of lead that is stuck to the bracket but for me it's too much of a hassle to deal with melting the lead off the brackets. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mix a few wheel weights in with my 100% lead when I'm making my ingots. IMO, wheel weights are too hard of am alloy to just use them alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to use them but right now I would suggest you not use them, especially if you have a bottom pour pot. I see more and more people ruining pots to the point LEE has put a warning in with the new pots saying not to use them and I'll explain why. The newer wheel weights have a large amount of zinc in them, they used to be mostly lead and antimony which all you had to do was melt them down, scrape the slag off, flux and scrape again and you could make some good ingots from them but not anymore. What happens to the lead when you have zinc contamination is the lead gets a goo like consistency and it will not pour out a bottom pour and it will clog it up real quick and they really isn't anyway to tell the difference unless you know wheel weights that you can tell which ones have a lot of zinc. What you want is linotype, sheet, or plumbers lead but if you decide to use the wheel weights be very careful because fluxing doesn't fix zinc contamination.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with Kicker...pain to melt. Got some sheet lead a number of years ago and luckly have not had to get any more. It's pure and does the job. Sometimes too soft a lead I believe will dent easier around rock on some jig heads thus causing paint to chip easier but most jig heads life span is pretty short around rock.

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about melting down bullets?

 

Lead in bullets is fine.  I know guys who used to get some from berms at the gun club firing range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  I use old wheel weights for the majority of my pouring projects with no issues. The only time I've ever had a problem with this is with very small gated molds, such as a split shot mold. Pure soft lead resolves that problem, but being that 27 of my 28 molds work fine with the scrap lead, that is what I primarily use.

  To make life simple I use an old pot to melt the scrap and skim all of the slag off. Some wheel weight shave paint on them, they're all dirty and some use inferior metal. Once I "clean up" the scrap lead, I pour it into a home made ingot mold and it is ready to go into my big pot when I need to add more lead to it.

   I've been pouring for close to 30 years for myself and friends. If you have any questions...feel free to ask. Kirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow ^^ thats the longest profile I have seen. And the wheel weights alone are too hard and can cause problems after using them solely as other allows can slowly build up and clog stuff and it can get really messy and dangerous with melted lead around. It is alright to use one or two per batch but not pure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't cast sinkers but I've been reloading and casting ammo for years. If you've got a lead thermometer keep your pot at 650degrees and zinc won't be a problem. However, I sort my wheel weights prior to casting. You can eliminate the bulk of non lead weights by looking at how the clip is on them. Most iron, and zinc look like the clip is riveted on instead of cast in. Just be safe I take a pair of cutters and squeeze every wheel weight, you will not be able to cut into iron or zinc. Lead will cut, synthetic will cut in half.

Some wheel weights are marked "fe" for iron, and "zn" for zinc, but the only confident way to make sure you don't contaminate your pot is to cut them in the sorting process.

Good luck, and flux often :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×