Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ok.  Just got my new crankbait rod (7' Abu Veritas medium action) along with my new bait caster (Lews speed spool) and was eager to try it out. Found some line laying around that I used last summer for attatching leader to my braid ( 12lb Viscious Flouro) and spooled some of that on it.  Put a 3/8 oz crawfish crankbait on and took it out side in the snow and started casting. One thing I noticed right off the bat compared to the only baitcaster that I have ever used before ( BPS Pro Qualifier with Abu Vandetta 6'6" medium fast) was that this setup was much lighter.  Backlashed the heck out of it until I got it dialed in. Had the breaking system set on 7 before it stopped backlashing.  Now I am a self admitted average caster on a good day, but I hardly ever backlash anymore but I struggled with this set up.  I also used 30lb Spiderwire braid on the PQ all of last year so throwing straight flouro reminded me why I stayed with braid. Once I got it dialed in and started casting accurataly, with out backlashes I got out the tape measure.  The furthest I could consistently cast was 65'.  Longest cast was 72'.   The temp was 35* and no wind to speak of.  So the question- is this an average, below average, or above average distance with this setup in this environment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3/8 oz isn't a real heavy bait. The first thing I'd check is the lure weight rating of the rod. I would expect the braid to cast a little better but not a ton over 12#. For the most part I would qualify 90' as a long cast. Of course more is possible under the right conditions but deep cranking is one technique where long casts really help. If the rod is not the problem I think you'll need to lighten up on the brakes and learn to thumb the spool more effectively. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to note is that the PQ has a dual braking system and the speed spool (if I remember correctly) only has the magnetic braking.  And as DVT said, lighten up the brakes and you'll be able to cast further, but you'll need to train your thumb to slow down the spool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a little heavier lure and lighten up the brakes and try 10 or 12 mono or braid instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

70 ft is only an average cast.  A long cast is around 100 ft, according to field tests with a variety of lures and fishermen.  It should get better as you gain more experience with your new rig and you can turn down the brakes and cast control to medium levels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok.  Just got my new crankbait rod (7' Abu Veritas medium action) along with my new bait caster (Lews speed spool) and was eager to try it out. Found some line laying around that I used last summer for attatching leader to my braid ( 12lb Viscious Flouro) and spooled some of that on it.  Put a 3/8 oz crawfish crankbait on and took it out side in the snow and started casting. One thing I noticed right off the bat compared to the only baitcaster that I have ever used before ( BPS Pro Qualifier with Abu Vandetta 6'6" medium fast) was that this setup was much lighter.  Backlashed the heck out of it until I got it dialed in. Had the breaking system set on 7 before it stopped backlashing.  Now I am a self admitted average caster on a good day, but I hardly ever backlash anymore but I struggled with this set up.  I also used 30lb Spiderwire braid on the PQ all of last year so throwing straight flouro reminded me why I stayed with braid. Once I got it dialed in and started casting accurataly, with out backlashes I got out the tape measure.  The furthest I could consistently cast was 65'.  Longest cast was 72'.   The temp was 35* and no wind to speak of.  So the question- is this an average, below average, or above average distance with this setup in this environment?

Try it again when the weather is good and you will see a difference again...............:Victory:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try it again when the weather is good and you will see a difference again............... :Victory:

Yeh I know I will probably gain some more distance in warmer weather.  I also plan on using braid which I hope gets the cranks and the jerkbaits out there.  This Veritas rod had great casting reviews as did the Lews Speed spool so I know it is more user issues but wanted a general idea how long a long cast should be with a 3/8 oz lure.

Thanks for the feedback!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You lost your centrifuge braking so your probably used to being able have a nice little snap in your beginning of the cast, which the centrifuge brake took care of.  Your more than likely going to have to retrain yourself on how you start your cast.  that little snap is what is causing your backlash. I watch my fishing partner do this all the time!  Start your cast smooth and follow through without trying to get anykind of snap throughout the whole cast.  you'll get back your distance eventually with proper technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO casting distance is predicated on 2 main factors, that's the rod and the type of lure being thrown.  I have set ups that I may get pretty close to 100 yds, but those are not what I'd be using bass fishing.  I highly doubt I ever cast 30 yds when I'm bass fishing, probably more like 15 on average.  I just try and move closer to my work, the longer the cast the more the fish can get unbuttoned.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's possible to get long casts from a magnetic only baitcaster. I'm using older model Bass Pro Shops Extreme reels, magnetic only braking, and they're very similar in design to the current $100 Lew's model reels. I routinely get 80' and longer casts using only 1/4 oz. baits on 6'6" M and MH rods. I also fish straight mono, fluorocarbon, or copolymer lines. The main thing is matching the lure weight and line size to the rod's recommended ranges. On my rods, my line is somewhere in the mid area of its rating, such as 12 pound line on a rod rated for an 8 - 17 pound range. The lure rating is actually bottomed out on 1/4 oz., because these rods I'm using have ranges of 1/4 - 3/4 or 1 oz..

Also dialing in the reel settings is important as well. Now, I do use a good bit of braking, sometimes having my magnetics set to the high end of the scale, never maxed out, but always above half. But I also have my spool tension knob set as loose as it will go, only just tight enough to stop side to side movement inside the reel frame. These settings, along with my current casting abilities, and rods matched to line and lure size, allows me very good casting for my uses.

I also make sure my spool bearings are properly lubed. I just have factory bearings, but I remove them during reel servicing, soak them in brake parts cleaner, and then dry them on a clean cloth, blow them out and finish air drying them, then add one single drop of light weight machine oil. Works very well for free spool. I actually recently posted a video here on this site of one of my reels freshly serviced and it shows a nice, long free spool spin with no line on it. Add line and centrifugal force would apply to add even more time, increasing either cast distance, or ease of casting to achieve the same distance.

Also, one final trick. Treat the line with KVD Line and Lure treatment. It's the best $10 I ever spent. Makes gnarly line much more manageable, smooths out casting, and adds distance as well. I saw a good 15 feet increase when I started using it. I don't need a nearly 100' cast though. To me, this is too far since line stretch would interfere with hook setting abilities at that distance. Maybe if I wanted a crankbait to have time to dive deeper I may attempt that distance. The main thing KVD done for me was make line more manageable, and made the effort needed to achieve my normal 80' cast range easier to do, requiring less wrist snap. I believe this stuff to be so good that I also use it on a Q-tip to swab the line guides on the rods. This does two things, first it will serve to check for guide damage (if cracked it will pull the cotton fibers and show potential problems before they happen), and it also cleans the gunk off of them from pond scum build up. It may also dry on the guides and leave a slicker surface, reducing friction which would otherwise kill cast distance and add to backlash potential. I believe it does adhere to the surface because once dry, the line guides do feel slicker to the touch. Like they've been waxed.

One final thing. Some baits just catch air. Spinnerbaits for example, are about the worst. Others, like crankbaits, are more streamlined and easier to cast longer distances. My 80' casts are using Bandit 100 series 1/4 oz. crankbaits. I can get the same distance and more from a spinnerbait, but to do this requires more effort, and it helps if wind is with me. Yesterday I put a Rapala X-rap XR-08 jerkbait on, and even casting into the wind I was achieving a good long range. These baits are very streamlined. I was just out in the back yard but I previously had measured off the yard in 10' spans to know what I was hitting. That's how I measure my casts using certain baits. The record I achieved, just for the sake of telling it, was a 1/4 oz. rated spinnerbait (these actually weigh double what's posted due to skirt, hook, wire, and blades added to the 1/4 oz. lead head) casted to 125' using only a 6' medium rod, 12 pound mono line, and one of these same reels. It took a heck of a throw to get it though, and at that time the line was not treated with KVD Line and Lure. I'm telling you, get some of this stuff and saturate your line with it.

Most rods seem to have a sweet spot they perform best in when line size, lure weight, user cast abilities with the chosen reel, and other factors come into alignment. With my set ups I can get my stated 80'. Someone else may use it and do better or worse on the same rig, and may need to readjust the reel to fit their cast abilities. Wind and weather play in as well. If you make a bad cast you can always just claim the sun was in your eyes. LOL. It's more believable if it's not an overcast day. Don't use this excuse for night fishing. Just claim you can't see at all. Haha.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 things.

 

1. Flush the bearings - the bearings in Lew's reels are typically stuffed to the brim with grease. Take them out and soak them in acetone, then reoil with 1 drop of a lighter reel oil. I saw a HUGE casting difference in my Lew's reel after I flushed the bearings.

 

 

2. Braking

The Speed spool has a 5 magnet linear braking system. This is the simplest form of a magnetic braking system, and the braking force does not taper. What that means is when you set your brakes to control the beginning of the cast (which requires more braking then rest of cast), that same amount of braking force will be induced on the spool throughout the whole cast.

In Daiwa's Magforce Z/V/3d, the magnetic force tapers as the spool slows down so there is less braking at the end of the cast. This gives much more distance. The magnetic taper occurs because the spool inductor is dynamic and shifts out farther into the magnetic field when the spool spins its fastest (beginning of cast), then the inductor retracts back to give less braking force as the spool slows down (and less braking to no braking is required.

 

To simulate the mag z/v/3d of the dynamic Daiwa magnetic braking system, you can use your thumb. Set the brakes at about half of what is needed to usually control the cast, and go to cast. "Thumb" the spool more at the beginning of the cast, and taper off the amount of force you push on the spool. You will not need to use your thumb for the last 2/3 to 1/2 off the cast as the magnetic brake you set earlier can now control that part easily on it's own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it may sound obvious, but make sure spool is completely full of line. Your casts will be shorter if it's not full.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you just need time with it. Practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow ~ in typical BR fashion you've received a lot of very good information here so far. 

 

Here's a little more food for thought. 

 

Once my reel is dialed in correctly, I find that proper technique rather than extra power or force during the cast will usually equate to better distance and less over runs.

 

Additionally, a little longer rod could also help you get some added distance.

 

Good Luck

 

A-Jay

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I have never taken the bearings out of a reel and flushed them but I will do a google search and get right on that.  Probably wouldn't hurt to do the same with the PQ.  I also will try the KVD line treatment.  Can that be used on braid? I think not having the dual braking system has certainly caused more difficulties as Fish mentioned.  I have always snapped pretty hard and I will have to relearn with the Lews.  I also have a President baitcaster that I haven't tried out yet but I believe that also has a dual braking system so i may feel more confident on that one.  I like the Lews alot just feels right but I obviously have some work to do.  Great Feedback guys! I have learned so much on this Forum over the winter months.  I just can't wait much longer to to start Bassin!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also will try the KVD line treatment.  Can that be used on braid?

Absolutely! I had braid on a Curado E7 and soaked it in the stuff. I don't know how it would have performed without it because it's the only time I ever had braid (I didn't like it) and I saturated the spool as soon as it was filled. Never had the slightest problems from using the KVD stuff on it though.

The main thing I don't like about braid is how noisy it is on the cast, how rough it feels when thumbing it, and when I get a snag, I cannot break it at all unless I use a leader and hope it breaks. Also line fray was a little issue since I fished it near rocks some. I don't like to be limited to using a rod in certain places only so I went back to mono type lines and throw anything anywhere now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing forum

    fishing

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing forum

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×