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jr45

To Buy Or Not To But

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I'm debating on buying a bass boat.  I bought one 3 years ago and sold it a year ago.  I guess you can say it was a bad experience with it.  I had to put an unexpected $1000 into right after I bought it.  I never used it much because each time I went to it wouldn't start or had other issues.

 

I love to fish and usually fish out of my buddies boat, but he is not fishing hardly at.  I'm not available to fish every weekend, but I would like to have a boat, I can haul down to the lake get in and go and not have to worry about the thing not starting once I get to where I want to fish (well aware things come up). 

 

Can I get a good used boat and expect this or am I just dreaming?  I want something reliable even though it may only get taken out 2-3 times per month.

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Buy a used Aluminum Semi-V and a small HP tiller.  Easy to work on and will start without hassle for years and years.

 

An early 90s Evinrude/Johnson motor below 35HP should last ages - with minimal maintenance that anyone can perform.   An aluminum boat doesn't care if it's in the sun or gets rained on.  You can be rough with them.

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BOAT- Bust Out Another Thousand! No regrets buying either of my boats though!

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You'll have to take care of any boat, if you leave it neglected then decide to run off to the ramp and use it then it's not for you.

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motors need lots of attention now a days with ethenol in the fuel it destroys everything if not watched. my new saw says dont even let treated fuel in it longer than three months because the octane rating drops so fast.

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You'll have to take care of any boat, if you leave it neglected then decide to run off to the ramp and use it then it's not for you.

That's it!!!You gotta maintain it just

like your truck.Smaller engine doesn't take a beating like those 250hp going 80mph in canal lol

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Get a kayak if you don't want any maintenance.  You can set them up with fish finders, rod holders, anchors, etc.  And you don't have to pay taxes or maintenance fees on them.  I have both and each one has it's own place, but if you don't want to sink any more money in maintenance costs then a kayak would be the way to go. 

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It's tough for someone ELSE to answer your question.  Can you afford to buy a boat and, as importantly, can you afford the upkeep on it?  Will you get much use out of it-even if you find yourself alone on it (without your buddy)?  Do you have a supportive or nagging spouse?  What kind of storage do you have for it? 

 

Old boats are like old people.  Some have been well maintained while others have had the heck beaten out of them.  You can generally tell what kind of treatment a boat has had by looking it over thoroughly but even then, I recommend you find someone knowledgeable to go with you.  Don't buy impulsively.  Look around.  In this market there are usually some decent deals out there-especially, I would guess, in your neck of the woods.  I would always put some ear muffs on the motor and try to start it cold (feel the engine first to make sure it's cold).  If it's warm when you arrive, it's a pretty good sign that it doesn't start easy (cold start) and the owner ran it ahead of time.

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Your not dreaming at all. There are several tell tale signs of abuse of the life the boat has lived before you got it. All really comes down to how much you want to spend and how patient you are in finding the right boat. I personally am always tinkering on something on my boat, not because there is anything wrong but because I am always looking for ways to improve something.

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I can afford a boat.  My wife doesn't care.  My son is old enough now where he is getting into fishing, so I could take him.  I'm no mechanic by any means, so I don't have the knowledge to fix stuff on it.  I can check stuff out and make sure it works if I know what to look for.  The boat would have to be kept outside as we don't have a garage.  I would buy a cover for both the boat and motor.

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Generally, IMHO, you get what you pay for. There is the occasional deal or steal.......but the more you pay, generally the better  condition the boat will be in to begin with. I am into my 3 year on my first owned boat. When I bought my boat I put in close to $750 the first weekend I bought the boat.....PFD's, required saftey equipment, oar,boat cover, motor cover, ect.

 

then wanted to update my electronics and trolling motor........now my electronics alone cost 50% of what I paid for my boat. I bought a 2001 procraft 185 pro for $7200 3 years ago. knock on wood I have had no major issues.

 

replaced the starter, plugs and fuel bulb last year in addition to having someone work on the finish patching little chips in the fiberglass.

 

I keep my boat outside in the winter after winterizing it. hopefully next winter I will have a carport in place to put under.....still covered but it will help keep the direct sun off the cover and the snow too.

 

Also, don't forget the trailer......maintain your bearings, tires and lights too!

Remember insurance is a cost too as is registration fees.

 

I just finished recarpeting my boat....$400+ and we did all of the work. Also.....I think it is time to replace the water pump.

 

I have come to learn that if it is related to boats then it will be costly.

 

B.O.A.T. Bust out another thousand.....................is not far from wrong. 

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There are plenty of good used boats out there. That being said you can't go out and buy a clunker and expect it to be perfect. If it looks like junk don't buy it because it show's how much that boat was cared for over it's lifetime. Stay away from anything with a Force motor on it. If you're looking for something cheap look for a smaller aluminum boat like a little v-hull. They are simple boats without too much that can go wrong with the boat itself.

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I wader fished for a few years before I decided that what I really needed was a boat. I looked around and finally chose a new 94 Bass Tracker TV 17 with a 60hp Merc and trailer. As it turned out, it was a great entry level boat. At $13,000. it was affordable and had all the basics, is easy to haul and maintain. I still have it and it's still in great shape. Best of luck to you!

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My mom always tells me the story about how my grandpa bought a boat that only went backwards. :laugh5:

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I say get a Kayak if you're unsure. No motor to worry about. I bought a wavewalk kayak (wavewalk.com) a couple years ago and I love it. I also have a Crestliner VT17 I bought new because I didn't want the hassle of dealing with someone else's problems. I'll tell you if I could only keep one, the boat would go and I'd keep the Kayak. Less hassle, and I can get into some places that are loaded with bass! Sure, it's a bit of work getting to the fishing spots but I need the exercise. The wavewalk is easy to fish out of in a standing position as well.

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BOAT- Bust Out Another Thousand! No regrets buying either of my boats though!

You beat me to my favorite quote about boats...well played!

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I grew up fishing out of a 14' Aluminum jon boat.  Motor went down and didnt fish the big lakes for a few years until I bought my 98 Procraft.  You get what you pay for.  The aluminum got the job done, but I can get from point A to point B in no time now and fish much more comfortably with the extra room.  I too need the excercise of a kayak, but would rather spend my time on the water fishing rather than rowing.  Just my .02 worth.

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Kayaks aren't really that enjoyable for me to fish out of. Sure they are fun for Kayaking and paddling around, but I like to be able to walk around a bit and carry more stuff with me. An aluminum Jon boat with a decent motor does the job in most cases. The wider you can afford, the better. Adds some stability and gives you some room to carry gear and friends along. Plus you can customize them as you please.

 

If you can afford it, get an all welded one with .100 or better hull.

 

I do not personally own one, but for the money, Weld-Craft makes appears to make a pretty decent boat.

 

You can check out some prices here:

http://directboats.com/weldcraft.html

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A boat is a hole in the water that you throw money into.

I have an 18' hole in the water. I spend what is needed to maintain it properly and so far I have had no issues.

Here's the thing, truly affording a boat isn't just having enough money for the purchase price. If you are uncomfortable throwing some money in the hole now and then, then you cannot afford it. Don't buy a headache.

If you ARE ok with the money for the upkeep, then take your time and educate yourself about the boats you are interested in. I spent about a year reading everything I could about bass boats.If you spend enough time reading, you will see patterns on which boats/motors have little or no issues, and you'll also see which boats/motors to stay away from....especially which motors to stay away from. If you get a motor that is known to have issues it can completely ruin your boating experience.

Take your time! Do it right! Then you will be rewarded with many flawless hours on the water with your son!

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Buy a used Aluminum Semi-V and a small HP tiller.  Easy to work on and will start without hassle for years and years.

 

An early 90s Evinrude/Johnson motor below 35HP should last ages - with minimal maintenance that anyone can perform.   An aluminum boat doesn't care if it's in the sun or gets rained on.  You can be rough with them.

There is something to be said for this. I have a 14 ft aluminum Semi V with a tiller motor.  Low maintenance  easy to handle.  I have to cover it though. The previous owner pulled out the seats and added a plywood carpeted floor. I like not having to climb over seats, but I have to keep it dry. Still, I don't even think I'd want a big bass boat if I could afford one. Just too many things to worry about.  I like keeping it simple.

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