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FishingMN

Does water become clearer deeper?

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In a northern lake with green water and visibility lost for lures 2-3 feet below the surface, is that same level of visibility present at 10' or 20'?   Is maybe the algae in the water concentrated to the top 5 feet? 

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No.

The deeper you go the less light you have penetrating into the depths.

 

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I don't know... ask the next bass you pull up from 20' ....

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Unless there's a spring feeding clear water, then no.

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Actually yes.  Below the thermocline it can get super clear despite there being less light.  Unless your water has high suspended sediment levels or is just super muddy it will be much clearer below about 20'. 

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Thats a good question , I dont know . Muddy water caused by wave action can have  clear water underneath 

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what about stained water??? some ponds near me are not muddy but have a dark tint to em! the shoreline to about 4 or 5 feet is clear

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Its generally going to get darker the deeper you go.  The reason for that is because of sunlight.  Where are the brightest rays from the sun?  Right at the surface.  However, that's where a lot of algae, vegetation, and other "stuff" that may be in the water often gathers too.  Ever see any of those shark week episodes where they're looking for new species of sharks?  They're all in deep water and its almost pitch black down there.

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Darkness and clarity are two entirely different things.   It could be bright but foggy so visibility is poor/short.   It could be dark, but clear so visibility is great/long.  I would seem to me algae would be nearest where there is light at the surface.   And would thin out with increased visibility as you go down deeper.  But i don't know.   I've never dived in green water to see how it is at 10, 15, or 20'.  

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11 minutes ago, FishingMN said:

Darkness and clarity are two entirely different things.   It could be bright but foggy so visibility is poor/short.   It could be dark, but clear so visibility is great/long.  I would seem to me algae would be nearest where there is light at the surface.   And would thin out with increased visibility as you go down deeper.  But i don't know.   I've never dived in green water to see how it is at 10, 15, or 20'.  

I've marked algae on my depthfinder 20+ feet down on river systems

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3 minutes ago, slonezp said:

I've marked algae on my depthfinder 20+ feet down on river systems

That's helpful, but rivers with current will mix water far more and deeper than a lake.

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Murky water is heavier - the top 10 - 20' of our reservoir can be clear but if they are drawing from the bottom gates the outflow can be dingy to muddy - this lake is about 125' deep.

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If the water has surface suspended particulates like algae or pollen bloom, wind generated soil erosion mud line, the water cold be very clear deeper.

Tom

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 Yes.  In the situation you described, northern lake with green water and visibility as such, the water is clearer under the suspended plankton and algae. The downside is those suspended particles reduce light penetration and change the the color of the light.  This is why firetiger is such a good choice under those conditions.

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20 hours ago, papajoe222 said:

 Yes.  In the situation you described, northern lake with green water and visibility as such, the water is clearer under the suspended plankton and algae. The downside is those suspended particles reduce light penetration and change the the color of the light.  This is why firetiger is such a good choice under those conditions.

Awesome. Good to know.  I was dropshotting with natural color roboworms and sorta though maybe I should switch to very dark, very light, or very colorful. So I understand that it is clearer water deeper, but it still makes sense to use a vivid/ highly visible appearance bait.

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2 hours ago, FishingMN said:

Awesome. Good to know.  I was dropshotting with natural color roboworms and sorta though maybe I should switch to very dark, very light, or very colorful. So I understand that it is clearer water deeper, but it still makes sense to use a vivid/ highly visible appearance bait.

When the water gets chunky I run a Bold Bluegill Robo and it gets bit quite a bit more. Clear water is M3 time. 

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16 hours ago, Mosster47 said:

When the water gets chunky I run a Bold Bluegill Robo and it gets bit quite a bit more. Clear water is M3 time. 

Cool! I will try that..

STA7K3__86498.1325798118.1280.1280.jpg?c

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I don't know if this answers the question, but it may add some insight to the question.

By J Floor Anthoni (2000-2005) www.seafriends.org.nz/phgraph/water.htm

Water is a substance which is 800 times denser than air. As soon as light enters the water, it interacts with the water molecules and suspended particles to cause loss of light, colour changes, diffusion, loss of contrast and other effects. A photo taken under water at one metre distance is not unlike a telephoto above water at 800 metres distance, both looking bluish while lacking contrast.
The way light changes under water is responsible for the typical under water 'atmosphere' and it offers creative possibilities not found on land. This chapter shows how light changes as it enters the water. It also discusses techniques to reduce unwanted scatter in photographs and how to restore colour.

 

http://www.seafriends.org.nz/phgraph/water.htm

 

 

 

 

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